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http://www.eutimes.net/2010/05/toxic-oil-spill-rains-warned-could-destroy-north-america/


I'm not saying the sky is falling, and you gotta weigh the source.... but this is something to think about, particularly regarding the dispersant being used.. I know in our area, whenever a gas station tank has a leak the "additives" make the groundwater unsafe for many miles around. Think about that on a scale of the Eastern US..(not to mention the other effects) Might be time to stock up on more Berkey filters or move out West.... BeSwift


Toxic Oil Spill Rains Warned Could Destroy North America

Posted by Europe on May 24th, 2010 // 247 Comments
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A dire report prepared for President Medvedev by Russia’s Ministry of Natural Resources is warning today that the British Petroleum (BP) oil and gas leak in the Gulf of Mexico is about to become the worst environmental catastrophe in all of human history threatening the entire eastern half of the North American continent with “total destruction”.

Russian scientists are basing their apocalyptic destruction assessment due to BP’s use of millions of gallons of the chemical dispersal agent known as Corexit 9500 which is being pumped directly into the leak of this wellhead over a mile under the Gulf of Mexico waters and designed, this report says, to keep hidden from the American public the full, and tragic, extent of this leak that is now estimated to be over 2.9 million gallons a day.

The dispersal agent Corexit 9500 is a solvent originally developed by Exxon and now manufactured by the Nalco Holding Company of Naperville, Illinois that is four times more toxic than oil (oil is toxic at 11 ppm (parts per million), Corexit 9500 at only 2.61ppm). In a report written by Anita George-Ares and James R. Clark for Exxon Biomedical Sciences, Inc. titled “Acute Aquatic Toxicity of Three Corexit Products: An Overview” Corexit 9500 was found to be one of the most toxic dispersal agents ever developed. Even worse, according to this report, with higher water temperatures, like those now occurring in the Gulf of Mexico, its toxicity grows.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in discovering BP’s use of this dangerous dispersal agent ordered BP to stop using it, but BP refused stating that their only alternative to Corexit 9500 was an even more dangerous dispersal agent known as Sea Brat 4.

The main differences between Corexit 9500 and Sea Brat 4 lie in how long these dangerous chemicals take to degrade into their constituent organic compounds, which for Corexit 9500 is 28 days. Sea Brat 4, on the other hand, degrades into an organic chemical called Nonylphenol that is toxic to aquatic life and can persist in the environment for years.

A greater danger involving Corexit 9500, and as outlined by Russian scientists in this report, is that with its 2.61ppm toxicity level, and when combined with the heating Gulf of Mexico waters, its molecules will be able to “phase transition” from their present liquid to a gaseous state allowing them to be absorbed into clouds and allowing their release as “toxic rain” upon all of Eastern North America.

Even worse, should a Katrina like tropical hurricane form in the Gulf of Mexico while tens of millions of gallons of Corexit 9500 are sitting on, or near, its surface the resulting “toxic rain” falling upon the North American continent could “theoretically” destroy all microbial life to any depth it reaches resulting in an “unimaginable environmental catastrophe” destroying all life forms from the “bottom of the evolutionary chart to the top”.

Note: For molecules of a liquid to evaporate, they must be located near the surface, be moving in the proper direction, and have sufficient kinetic energy to overcome liquid-phase intermolecular forces. Only a small proportion of the molecules meet these criteria, so the rate of evaporation is limited. Since the kinetic energy of a molecule is proportional to its temperature, evaporation proceeds more quickly at higher temperatures.

As over 50 miles of the US State of Louisiana’s coastline has already been destroyed by this spill, American scientists are warning that the damage may be impossible to repair, and as we can read as reported by the Associated Press News Service:

“The gooey oil washing into the maze of marshes along the Gulf Coast could prove impossible to remove, leaving a toxic stew lethal to fish and wildlife, government officials and independent scientists said. Officials are considering some drastic and risky solutions: They could set the wetlands on fire or flood areas in hopes of floating out the oil. They warn an aggressive cleanup could ruin the marshes and do more harm than good.”

And to understand the full import of this catastrophe it must be remembered that this disaster is occurring in what is described as the “biologically richest waters in America” with the greatest amount of oil and toxic Corexit 9500 set to come ashore in the coming days and weeks to destroy it completely for decades to come.

Reports are also coming from the United States that their government is secretly preparing to evacuate tens-of-millions of their citizens from their Gulf of Mexico States should the most dire of these scientific warnings start to come true.

To the greatest lesson to be learned by these Americans is that their government-oil industry cabal has been just as destructive to them as their government-banking one, both of which have done more to destroy the United States these past couple of years than any foreign enemy could dare dream was possible.

But to their greatest enemy the Americans need look no further than their nearest mirror as they are the ones who allowed these monsters to rule over them in the first place.
 

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Yeh , but Tony said ...

"The Gulf of Mexico is a very big ocean. The amount of volume of oil and dispersant we are putting into it is tiny in relation to the total water volume," Hayward said.
:rolleyes:
 

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That is interesting in that it contradicts something else I heard. A couple of weeks ago there was a squawk on the AM radio saying that the Louisiana authorities had asked BP not to use ANY dispersant at the well site as experience had shown that it makes mop up at the coastline more difficult. If the oil remains thick it is easier to boom and recover if it comes ashore. Toxicity was not mentioned. Then the EPA overruled the LA authorities claiming that dispersal at the well head was better. Believe what you will on this one, because I doubt ANY of the parties involved are telling the whole truth.
 

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The dispersant is causing the oil to seperate and not being allowed to be collected off of the surface. Where it would be easier to fight. It is also thought the oil is staying under the surface, because of the dispersants. Plumes of oil have been found between 3600 to 4200ft down and spreading as far as six miles away from the blown well head.
The amount of actual oil leaking into the Gulf is still unknown and latest figures put it at between 60,000 to 100,000 barrels a day. And this was with the old containment cap in place. The cap was removed Saturday allowing the well to gush full force. Early Monday evening and new containment cap was set in place. They could not even try to close the well before they felt the cap was completly in place. Once they feel it is secure, they will slowly begin closing vents and valves to make sure it will stand the pressure. If it does they will again attach lines to siphon off the oil to containment vessels on the surface. They had two prior and are hoping they can have three with this new cap. They are hoping this new cap will seal the leak. It is doubtful. They are hopeful they can at least siphon off more oil than before. It is just hopeful.
With this well leaking as much as say 75,000 barrels a day into the Gulf, (just giving a safe estimate), now being in day 85 since the blowout, it would seem around 6,375,000 barrels of oil has been spewed into the Gulf waters. at 55 gallons a barrel this comes out to, oh sorry, my calculator does not read in that many digits.
Hundreds of birds have died as have hundreds of sea turtles. As have a number of porpoise, but no one is clear as the the actual number. Oysters are dying as are shrimp, fish and crab.
One oyster fisherman was dredging up a few oyster, along with Anderson Cooper from CNN on board his boat. All he brought aboard were dead. He showed Anderson the difference between some of them, saying, this one is about three months old. This one is about three years old. So to make his point, even if all of the oil was cleaned out of the Gulf today. It would take more than three years for the oyster beds to recover. Five years? Ten years? Who knows? No one knows or can fully understand the results of this disaster. And the people along the Gulf Coast, in one way or another, will suffer because of it for years. Problem is, once it progresses, it will not just be confined to the Gulf Coast.
Once a large tropical storm or hurricane hits us, the oil will be driven even deeper into our marshlands. Contaminating even more fishing grounds. And yes. The storms, in all probability, will pick up the oil and disperse it deeply over the coastal regions with the rain.
No oil or tarballs showed up in Texas waters until Alex passed.
Even more oil is out there now because they removed the cap to replace it. More oil is still gushing out until they can test the new one. And this still may not work.
It ain't pretty, and I left out a lot of other details. Personal loss. Lost lifestyles, jobs, culture and business. People are going to lose their homes. Men can't get the money to pay their bills or put food on their tables, provide for their families.
But that should give you some idea.:angry:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the 1st hand reply from someone directly impacted by this disaster. I can only imagine the hard times ahead for the LA coast for many years to come. BeSwift
 

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I had heard somewhere that doom and gloomers and environmentalists were saying that the oil or the dispersants could cause toxic rain and kill crops all over North America. Those are all the stories you can find if you use Google. However, I also saw an interview with a NOAA weather scientist who said that it would be impossible because the oil and chemical dispersants were heavier than water, and thus did not evaporate and become airborne vapor which forms the droplets which then become heavy enough to fall as rain. She said it was more like puting a glass of salt water in the sun, eventually the water evaporates and the salt is left behind. On the ocean in the Gulf, all of the oil and dispersants are (will be) left behind. Even in a hurricane, there may be surface oil picked up into the wind and blown anywhere, but there will not be toxic rain. That made me feel better and I hope it does you all as well.
 

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Uh... Alan... if oil floats on top of water.... then......

Same for benzene and methyl chloride basically dry cleaning solvent and evaporates very easily. And hydrogen sulfide is a gas that when combined with water is the main constituant of acid rain .. ask anybody in the Northeast what that can do.

Alan I wouldn't trust the scientific word from anybody that thinks oil is heavier than water ....

Sorry

Now , as with everything real and factual, the actual truth is a bit more complicated... "Oil" is made up of a variety of chemical compounds.. some lighter than water , some just about the same "Weight" as water and some a little heavier than water..

The lighter stuff evaporates, the same weight stuff comes in on the waves, and the heavier stuff will sink and posion sea life for generations.

http://blog.al.com/live/2010/05/experts_on_gulf_oil_spill_just.html

The posionious vapors of benzene and methyl chloride will combine with water to various degrees and fall with rain
http://www.freedrinkingwater.com/water-contamination/benzene-removal-water.htm

Methyl Chloride

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/Mhmi/mmg14.html

The problem with the current leak in the Gulf is that these contamiments are at abnormally high levels

I'm having a little problem finding articles defining exactly how high above normal some of these toxic hydrocarbon concentratios are that don't come with hysterical political comentary so y'all can google for that if ya want.

The upside is , unlike coal and oil fired powerplants and car emmisions The BP Gulf oil leak may turn out to be an acute event rather than an apparent permenant feature of our civilization.
 

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Doh! You caught me, ha ha! I don't know why I typed heavier than water. I think I need more sleep than I've been getting. The NOAA scientist did say the oil and dispersants couldn't become rain though. I got at least that much of what she said correct. If I'd paid better attention to that particular interview I could direct you all to the source, but I can't for the life of me remember where I saw it.
 

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After reading this post I put my trusty ph meter in the rain gauge. We had 1.1 inches of rain today brought in from the gulf by the sea breeze. PH was 6.2 So far so good.
 

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Yeah... I think Alan might need to reread my post including the links...oh well...
 

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Yeah... I think Alan might need to reread my post including the links...oh well...
Of course oil is lighter than water. Even if the oil is not in a concentration of say, a slick of heavy raw crude, there is a sheen on the surface that will be picked up by any storm entering the Gulf waters with very high turbulence to the waters. Alex was a good ways off. It caused high seas and shut down the vessels that were skimming the oil but, was not a storm with enough strength, in the local area, to draw the oil, or even the oil sheen, up to disperse elsewhere. Maybe some. A storm that hits more directly at us will. It will not only draw up the sheen, which is just a light layer, it will also draw up some of the heavy crude. How far inland it will disperse, is anyones guess. I know one thing. It will kill the Louisiana wetlands and marshes. Possibly Mississippi also. Depending on where the storm comes ashore, it will have a dire effect on Texas, Alabama and Florida also. Of course that all depends on the location of the hit.
We have had a lot of westerly winds lately in the Gulf. This is moving the oil futher along our coast towards Texas, and at the same time giving a bigger threat to all of our southern coast. It was mostly confined to the Southeastern part of Louisiana. But now it is moving further west.
One third of the local fishing areas of the Southeastern Louisiana coast, the Gulf, is now closed to fishing. With the oil moving further west, this area will grow. Areas off Mississippi, Alabama and Florida are closed to fishing and swimming. Not all though. So, if you are planning a vacation down here, do some research before you come down.
There is a current called the loop current that flows through the Gulf from south to north and then back southeast. It then gets caught up in the Gulf Stream, that goes around Florida and along the eastern seaboard. So far this year, the loop has not gone far enough north to really have an effect on the spill. But it will. Once the loop current moves futher north it will pull the oil down and east through the Gulf. It will get caught up in the Gulf Stream and bring the oil into the Florida Keys. It won't stop there. It will go around Florida and up the eastern seaboard. Models than show it can also get caught up in some of the Atlantic ocean currents and bring the oil to the shores of England and Europe.
This is not a joke. This is not a game and is serious shit.
The temporary containment cap was pulled off Saturday to be replaced with a new cap that was thought to be able to completly cap the well, or allow more oil to be siphoned off to vessels on the surface, until the relief wells can be completed. Once the temporary cap was removed, this well was gushing full force into the Gulf with between 60,000 to 100,000 barrels a day spewing into the Gulf waters. Not gallons. Barrels of oil.
The new cap was placed Monday. It was supposed to be tested as early as Tuesday to see if it can stand the pressure of the blown well. As of my latest info, early this morning, the test have not been run, the well is still open and gushing. Test may be done today.
Latest estimates I have heard are at least 24,000 jobs have been lost in Louisiana. Of course we all know all of the work by the fishermen and oilfield workers off the coast of Louisiana is not confined to Louisianians alone. Many from other states are suffering also with no end in sight for the near future.
I don't see it getting better in the short term. It will only get worst. Is getting worse. No way possible it can get better any time soon.
 

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I am concerned over the reports I have read that the casing itself may now be compromised due to erosion from the high pressure/ high speed gas/oil flow picking up sand... If they fully close off the well, some experts say, the pressure may rupture the casing itself. And capping off the wellhead won't do anything to stop the oil leaking from the reported fissures in the seabed itself that were opened up by the initial methane explosions that sank the rig.
 

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I am concerned over the reports I have read that the casing itself may now be compromised due to erosion from the high pressure/ high speed gas/oil flow picking up sand... If they fully close off the well, some experts say, the pressure may rupture the casing itself. And capping off the wellhead won't do anything to stop the oil leaking from the reported fissures in the seabed itself that were opened up by the initial methane explosions that sank the rig.
Well. If there are fissures in the seabed, and that is still a fact that has not yet been determined, capping the well itself, will not stop them. Unless the casing can be plugged and sealed completly below these fissures and any ruptures in the casing.
The thought is that some of the casing below the surface was damaged below the BOP, and leaks in the seabed are occuring. I am not sure if this has been proven as of yet, but I have to say, it is highly likely. Very likely. If that is the case, even if this well is ever fully capped, the leaks through the seabed could still occur. Of course, that depends on the depth of the cracked seabed, ruptured casing below the seabed and where the casing will actually be sealed and capped.
If the relief wells will do what they are expecting them to do, fill the casing with drill mud until the pressure equalizes, then allow them to pour cement in to fully cap and seal the well, it may work. Of course, if the cap and seal is above any part of the casing that is ruptured below, it will only be some time before it will be coming up through the seabed. The pressure should not be able to push throw the cement cap. I don't think there is anyway they can check the casing to find out how far down any ruptures may have occured. And the casing can be plugged without knowing it has damage below the plug. The casing can hopefully be sealed off, but any small damage to the casing below the seal, will continue to emit oil. And of course, over a period of time it will get worst. Causing more oil to escape that may be undetected for a long period of time, unless closely monitered. Which I am sure will not happen if left to BP or this administration.
I am not optimistic of the outcome.
 

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There have been reports over the years of fish, frogs and other 'heavier than water' objects being picked up in storms and deposited in other locations so I think it possible in isolated circumstances but unlikely that a toxic cloud of oil and dispersant vapors will envelope N.America and kill us all.

Whatever happened with that oil consuming bacteria they had developed and started using during the Exxon-Valdeze event?
 

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There have been reports over the years of fish, frogs and other 'heavier than water' objects being picked up in storms and deposited in other locations so I think it possible in isolated circumstances but unlikely that a toxic cloud of oil and dispersant vapors will envelope N.America and kill us all.

Whatever happened with that oil consuming bacteria they had developed and started using during the Exxon-Valdeze event?
Good question. The area around the Valdeze spill is, as far as I know, still in doubt.
And this in the Gulf is much worst.
 

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You know I just realized, this is only a single oil well. What happens in a real bad case scenario, end of the world type thing. Are they gonna take the time to cap all those rigs BEFORE evacuating to be with their families? What happens after 10 or 20 years of neglect, those caps gonna be permanent if nobody checks on them periodically?
Same with nuclear power plants and waste storage facilities. We have gotten ourselves into a real bad place alright.
 

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You forgot, what happens if an enemy declares war and does to the rigs in the gulf what Saddam Husein did to the wells in Kuwait?
 
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