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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just walked out of the pawn shop with a Dutch Mannlicher M1895? Hemburg 1918 rifle. The stock is rough, full of character. The metal is good but dark, no rust or pitting. It's full of grease and dust! I believe it's in 6.5x53r? I payed $109 out the door, he wouldn't go any lower. The bore has strong rifling but it's dark (as suspected). Can anyone educate me? I thought it was a Gew1888 Commission rifle at first, seeing the en bloc fed magazine like the M95 straight pull Steyr, but I did a quick google search and that changed it. There are crown proofs all over it, a crown with a letter. There's a large stock repair to the butt. I know pretty much nothing about these rifles, can anyone help? All feedback is appreciated!
 

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Nice find. These are well made; the original production for the Dutch was by Steyr in Austria. The round can be made from .303 British or .30-40 Krag brass. In simple terms, it is a rimmed version of the 6.5x54 as used by Greece in their Mannlicher-Shoenauer rifles. It will require the special en-bloc clip to feed from the magazine. I can't imagine a better thing to spend $109 on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nice find. These are well made; the original production for the Dutch was by Steyr in Austria. The round can be made from .303 British or .30-40 Krag brass. In simple terms, it is a rimmed version of the 6.5x54 as used by Greece in their Mannlicher-Shoenauer rifles. It will require the special en-bloc clip to feed from the magazine. I can't imagine a better thing to spend $109 on.
Wow thanks. I thought it was a pretty good deal. I've seen the en blocs on Liberty Tree for a decent price, I just need to find reloading components!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Another thing, the bore is flawless. Lands and grooves are well defined, it's clean, no pitting or rust.
 

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Your rifle was made for the Koninklijk Nederlandsch-Indisch Leger or as I call them the KNIL. This was the name of the Dutch Army in what is now Indonesia. They had their own specifications for their rifles and carbines, which are totally different from those of the Army of the Netherlands. Two quick ways to tell is the small hole on each side of the receiver for gas release in case of a ruptured cartridge and for the rifle it's the upturn at the rear of the grasping groove on the stock. The carbines did not have hand guards. Check the caliber very carefully because after Indonesian Independence most of these were converted to .303 caliber. The condition is a bit better than average for rifles from this climate. Does the bolt match the serial number? Nice find at a good price. Thanks for sharing your latest find.
Dan in Texas
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I couldn't find the serial number on the rifle. We had to use the bolts SN for the 4473. I'm waiting for this Kroil to penetrate the gunk in the action screws to take the stock off. Where would it be?
 

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It's on the top of the barrel above the chamber. To see it you need to remove the hand guard. To remove the hand guard first lift up the rear sight as far as it will go. The hand guard is held in place by two clips similar to a Mauser. The rear most clip is directly under the hand guard where the grasping groove on the forearm turns up. The second is near the front. Carefully push up on the rear underside of the hand guard with your thumbs using the upturned grooves as a guide. It may take some force but be gentle these crack easily. Once you have that clear then grasp the top of the hand guard about two inches from the front and pull up on it. When both ends have cleared the barrel, rotate it 90 degrees and lift it over the standing rear sight.
Dan in Texas
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Haha too late, sorry! :sorry: It came off real easy, with no damage done to the handguard. I have always been weary of taking off the handguard from my vz23 and No1 Mk3 because I don't wanna break them. Serial number is 269, I don't see any other markings. This rifle is marked 7.7 on the buttplate. It also chambered a factory .303 round smoothly, my crappy dummy round was out of proportion.
 

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Since your rifle was reworked for the 303 brit cartridge. When firing it do not be suprised if you get a wierd looking neck on the neck of the case. The carbine I had was also chambered for 303 but evidently the reamer did not cut the neck like a standard 303 case. In other words it didn't exactly clean up the old chamber. Had it with mine and heard from a couple members here about the same results. Frank
 
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