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Went out today on a little sneak and peek! I was on the hunt for a DDR marked 91/30 and after searching through half a dozen crates and stores stopped by one last place. They were kind enough to let me search their 91/30 inventory and there were no DDR marked 91/30s present. But they did have a Yugoslav 24/47 for $130. I was particularly impressed with the crest still being intact. Below are some pics. If I understand correctly, this was produced sometime in the mid 1920s then reworked after WWII? So is it safe to assume that it could have seen combat in WWII? The other question is the stock marking "1.TRZ" ? And forgot there is a triangle with an inverted V and a 13 on the receiver!

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So what do y'all think?
 

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1.TRZ is Yugoslavian facility where rifle was worked on. You will find this same marking on mosins imported from Yugoslavia so it is not all that rare on Yugoslavian rifles.

If you want a DDR marked mosin, there is one in local store. It is has hex receiver and was made in 1935. Interesting piece, was made during transition from hex to round receiver and was used by DDR after the war. PM me if you want store address.
 

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There is a wealth of information on Yugo Mausers in "Serbian and Yugoslav Mauser Rifles." If you are at all interested in these rifles I recommend that you acquire a copy. I believe the author is a Zastava historian; regardless, he is quite knowledgeable. To answer your questions though, the Yugo M24/47 did begin life as the M24, an earlier model. They were produced from the mid-1920s until 1941 (according to the above source). The first 100,000 rifles were produced in Belgium and the later production rifles were made in Kragujevac, a city in modern Serbia. Branko, the author, doesnt go into too much specific detail about the country/people's involvement in WWII, but he does say that the government resistance was short-lived, lasting only around 11 days after the initial German invasion. He also states that 250,000 M24 rifles were captured by the Wehrmacht while in storage at Kragujevac. He goes on to describe rifles with which the Partizans were able to secure to fight the Germans, these rifles are described as hybrids built from parts which were recaptured. I guess from what I can gather, it is completely possible that M24 rifles were used to fight the Germans, they were certainly in existence then... but who knows. Sorry I can't offer more concrete details. I can tell you that your M24/47 sports a refurb mark which indicates it was a rather early refurb... as the "ZAVOD 44" marking was changed early on to "PREDUZECE 44" the latter being much more common. Also, similar to other rifles produced in countries which experienced communist revolution after the war, most of the M24s had their markings scrubbed... the crest you commented on is the correct communist government crest... if you look carefully, you might be able to see a date on the torch... that date signifies the beginning of the new communist state (in 1943). As for the 1. TRZ, ij70 got it right... it was a refurb facility... as for the other mark you mentioned I have seen it on M24/47s in my collection, but I do not know what it signifies... maybe someone can enlighten us both?
 

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I just want to know how come some folks get to root around "out back" on the crates to find this stuff. In this area such a request would be greeted by hysterical laughter and requests for a repeat when all the staff were gathered so nobody misses the joke.
 

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Bought a M24/47 today

Went out today on a little sneak and peek! I was on the hunt for a DDR marked 91/30 and after searching through half a dozen crates and stores stopped by one last place. They were kind enough to let me search their 91/30 inventory and there were no DDR marked 91/30s present. But they did have a Yugoslav 24/47 for $130. I was particularly impressed with the crest still being intact. Below are some pics. If I understand correctly, this was produced sometime in the mid 1920s then reworked after WWII? So is it safe to assume that it could have seen combat in WWII? The other question is the stock marking "1.TRZ" ? And forgot there is a triangle with an inverted V and a 13 on the receiver!
Must be nice to be someplace where there are "crates" and "backrooms" with milsurps to paw through. I hazard to say you probably have more in one shop than I can find in a 100 square miles. I had a 24/47 transferred to me at a local gunshop and when we pulled it out of the box, one of the owners commented (rather snobbishly I might add) "I didn't know anybody actually bought those." On the other end of the spectrum, some assume any milsurp is a priceless WWII heirloom and charge accordingly. The in between just use Mitchell's as a reference price guide.:mad

Annyyy-way. The rifle was more likely produced in the 1930s. Production didn't really start until 1928, with '29 as the first year of full production.

The 1TRZ shop was(is?) located in Cacak, Serbia and is probably the second most common shop marking found on these. It's no wonder the crest is still present. They were applied post WWII (as you surmise) and usually are intact on these rifles though I have seen a few defaced, usually by peening. I assume such destruction was wrought after the collapse of the former Republic of Yugoslavia.

Check the bore. Many of these were rebarreled right before final internment into storage. That being the case, it will likely want about 200 rounds break in before it settles down to consistent shooting.

That looks like a nice one and $130 is a very fair price these days.
Nice find. Congrats.:thumbsup:
 

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Nice find for $130 and a good siderail mark to start with...It being the earliest marking for the most prolific refurber I think its a great one to start with..Two more to go for that factory(Refurb Facility)

The 1.TRZ stock mark will be found on rifles refurbed by many diff. Facilities..There was obviously a major stock Production/refurbishment center there(Cacak) that supplied them to others..A note that many of these places did much more than just small arms

I am certain the Germans made good use of the M24 rifles they captured...I'll bet many were simply retained by or issued to there Croation Allies to start..I have a great example with a stock that shows use by 3 armies..one of which was German as they cut the sling slot out in the buttstock..It went from Royal Yugoslav(King Petar) to German and finaly was refurbed into an M24/47 by the Yugoslav Comunists..

I think BY FAR The most interesting feature on your rifle is the Star on the buttstock..It is a Terrific find In my oppinion!!

When I look at it I see that it was a pre refurb carving that was not completely removed when the stock was sanded during transition to M24/47 configuration post war..It shows use by Tito's partizan(Comunist) forces during the German and German allied ocupation..A super find that proves use during the conflict

Yugoslavia had a very bloody civil war going on at the same time they were fighting the Germans..Google and Wiki for more details but here is a very basic synopsis:

Tito's comunists were fighting against the Royal Yugoslav forces..Croatia became a puppet state of Germany so both Tito and Royals fought them as well as the Germans and 20 or so divisions of Ittalians who when they were forced to withdraw forced Germany to send much needed elswhere forces
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I just want to know how come some folks get to root around "out back" on the crates to find this stuff. In this area such a request would be greeted by hysterical laughter and requests for a repeat when all the staff were gathered so nobody misses the joke.
Actually these were a chain of pawn shops that had open crates of 91/30s out on the showroom floor. Anyone can walk up and, if you are gentle about it, sift throght the pile. They said they got tired of people asking to go back to the stockroom so they simply brought them out. And beside the crate, are buckets with all the accessories, so you can look through that too. I must say that, aside from the 91/30s this was the only non sporterized rifle out of all the shops I went to. One had an Enfield that had been butchered. And one had a few commercial M1 carbines that they wanted a king's ransom for. Finding the M.27/47 was pure luck. The counter guy said another buyer was in a few days ago that wanted it but he was waiting till he got paid.

The bore on it is absolutely perfect. There are a few arsenal repairs on the stock so from what I can tell it saw some honest use.


From what everyone has said, I am very excited about the history of the rifle!
 
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