Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
105,691 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Book Review: "The Volga Rises in Europe" by Curzio Malaparte by Rev. Two Bands

A rather unusual and quite interesting book is Curzio Malaparte's "The Volga Rises in Europe", a somewhat left-leaning eyewitness report on the German advance into Russia as of Summer (June - September) 1941, and - of special interest here - of the siege of Leningrad, seen from among the Finnish troops, and from out of the Finnish trenches (March - November 1942). Malaparte was a war-correspondent but also a novelist, and had a keen eye for human realities.
Recommended !
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,938 Posts
I do not agree as I felt it was a great book. It is one of the best for insights into the Finnish mindset. Most books done by non Finns have little understanding of the Finnish view -this author did. Great read.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Hmmmmm....... I too enjoyed this book although it is a bit expressionistic.

If you want to travel the outer reaches of imagination try 'Kaputt' by the same author. It's just been re-issued in a very good translation by the New York Review of Books, it's a bit of a read but I found it very worthwhile.

Peter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I agree with Sean and Tuco. It was a nice change of pace to get the personal view of an outside observer despite the fact the he was obviously a lefty. Where else can you get the view from the Finnish trenches of Leningrad burning. The little German cemetaries springing up continuously along the German line of march and the pathetic images of the destroyed city of Vyborg remind one of the price of victory.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,938 Posts
I think those that are non native English speakers might really have an issue with this book as it can be tough to read in areas. His style is almost as if he is writing a poem.
 

·
Silver Bullet Member an all around excellent guy
Joined
·
48,572 Posts
I think those that are non native English speakers might really have an issue with this book as it can be tough to read in areas. His style is almost as if he is writing a poem.

Correct.

He became most flowery when viewing the effect of machines and mechanization on warfare and using that to compare the Germans to their Russian foes. We must remember that his views on the historic advent of mechanization in warfare must be viewed through his eyes. The general populations of Europe in 1940 were even less accustomed to machines than our countrymen. It was indeed a brave new world to see civilizations being overrun by "machines" which to our late 20th century eyes were only moderately mechanized armies.

Especially interesting to me was the section where the old Russians, after the Germans had come through, were re-opening the churches that had been closed by the Communists. Their own children, raised from birth under communist rule, were uninterested. Even in the far off rural environment of the Russian steppe, the Communists had successfully squelched Christianity in one generation.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top