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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I was having a difficult time cycling my bolt on my '28 Izzy because the two surfaces on the the bolt body and cocking piece that rub together when you first cycle the bolt up were not mating properly I guess you could say. I used some ballistol on that area and it helped out a lot. I would cycle the bolt about 30 times then clean/lube wear marks with ballistol, then repeat. I have it pretty smooth now, but is there some kind of trick to make these two sufaces have as little friction as possible? A special lube that's gritty that properly breaks this in?

I tried smoothing the surfaces to a mirror shine with P400 wet/dry sandpaper as the first thing, but it didn't help too much. The ballistol and cycling the bolt repeatedly seemed to work the best.

Thanks
 

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I guess you could use some polishing compound, any would probably do. That would mate the surfaces better together. But be aware it will make the surfaces more shiny than they are now. How much they do, is up to you on how much you polish.
 

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Hey guys,

I was having a difficult time cycling my bolt on my '28 Izzy because the two surfaces on the the bolt body and cocking piece that rub together when you first cycle the bolt up were not mating properly I guess you could say. I used some ballistol on that area and it helped out a lot. I would cycle the bolt about 30 times then clean/lube wear marks with ballistol, then repeat. I have it pretty smooth now, but is there some kind of trick to make these two sufaces have as little friction as possible? A special lube that's gritty that properly breaks this in?

I tried smoothing the surfaces to a mirror shine with P400 wet/dry sandpaper as the first thing, but it didn't help too much. The ballistol and cycling the bolt repeatedly seemed to work the best.

Thanks
Sounds like the cam surfaces are as smooth as they can be already.
Try using grease. I lube all of my bolt actions with Fluoramics "Lightning Grease" with good results. Others have used weaker mainsprings, which may result in misfires with some hard primers.
 

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While every Mosin bolt has its own "Character" and has lots of moving parts that effect how well the bolt cocks open , I have found that one coil off the FP spring helps alot and does not give soft strikes on hard military primers. More than one coil and you are in the zone of light strikes. I have some rifles with two coils off the springs with no light strikes but I recommend if you go for two coils , you get a spare spring. If you are shooting commercial primers and not milsurp, two coils or more (test and trial by error), will yield a very slick operating bolt with sure fire strikes on civilian primers AND CLICK CLICK no bang on military hard primers.

Congrats on your choice of Ballistol. Its the best stuff I have found for Mosin or other milsurp bores that I shoot corrosive ammo through and want them cleaned and preserved from corrosion.

The only Mosin bolt I have ever handled that was just butter smooth and opened on cocking just incredibly fluid was a rifle Badger showed me. He replaced his FP spring with a light one he had specially made up and then he worked that bolt with some kind of compound about a million times. It was the nicest bolt action I have ever cycled. It had the finest trigger pull one could ever want and his craftmanship on building this Mosin sporter was equal to any pre war gunsmith in Europe.

Pls note: you may be just fine with one coil off the FP spring but more can get you also into the zone of the rifle not passing the bump test on the floor. If you proceed to alter that FP spring, then test your rifle to be sure the sear will hold the cocking piece back. With unloaded rifle, cock the bolt and hit the butt of the rifle on a padded area on the the floor and if the rifle cocking piece goes forward....you got cut off too much of that spring and its not safe. If the cocking piece remains to the rear after a few bumps, you are most likely just fine. Just remember that when you begin to alter the internals of a bolt or mess with triggers and sears: you are altering the solar system of fitted parts inside your rifle and strange things may happen or not happen. They made these rifles very robust so Joe Tent Peg could not screw them up and when guys like me tweek sears and other parts, we are altering these robust tolerances.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hey guys,
I think I've got it pretty smooth now, or as smooth as I'm going to get it. And I already cut one coil off the FP spring - made for an excellent trigger pull. I will look into the grease or polishing if I have further issues. Thanks again
 

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Polished all the contact faces on my 44 with my dremmel, some felt rollers, and a stick of rouge compound. Made a wonderful improvement.
 

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I use 2 things 1 is engine valve grinding compund for tough stuff there are 2 grits in a can and rubbing compund for car finishes, there are alot of different grits. I paint the bolt with dye chem and cycle it several times and see where it gets shiny and go from there. Nothing works like cycling the rifle. Oswald's wife said "Lee was always practicing moving the bolt, 1000 and 1000s of times." Must have worked we all know, how it turned out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I use 2 things 1 is engine valve grinding compund for tough stuff there are 2 grits in a can and rubbing compund for car finishes, there are alot of different grits. I paint the bolt with dye chem and cycle it several times and see where it gets shiny and go from there. Nothing works like cycling the rifle. Oswald's wife said "Lee was always practicing moving the bolt, 1000 and 1000s of times." Must have worked we all know, how it turned out.
Awesome! I knew there had to be a special gritty formula/compound that would make these bolts cycle smoother. Do you recommend a certain brand/grit? It will most likely only need to be used on the cam surfaces. Thanks
 

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I'll second the valve lapping compound. you can get it at auto parts stores, and it comes in two grades in one pack. You can start out with the rough, then move to the fine, and after that if you still feel it isn't smooth enough wal mart sells a 3000 grit polishing compoung that comes in a squeeze bottle back in their automotive section for a finer polish.
best way I've found to polish the two surfaces is to take the trigger out of an action, put the barrelled action back in the stock. put the lapping compound between the two cam surfaces and then pop in a good movie and work the bolt back and forth in the action. that way you are polishing the two surfaces against each other and with the trigger out, it won't cock so every time you work the bolt handle up and down the cocking piece moves back and forth.
The movie helps as this can be a very boring process.
y'all have a good day, Keith
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Keith - printing out for future reference if problem arises again or I just NEED to have a smoother cycling bolt. Yeah, I had to break-in my Rem 870 by cycling the pump-action 500 or so times in front of the TV lol Had to take a few breaks........ Thanks again!
 
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