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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
went down to the local hardware shop to buy some pure linseed oil and was told that all they had was raw and boiled, i bought the raw??

wise choice or do i head back and swap it?

cheers

tertle
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
haha

re-read Mr Hortons advice and i see that i was to get pure raw linseed oil, the non toxic stuff that wont make my wee wee fall off

righto now the newbie restorer can go back to his soaking! confident that all will be ok! for rifle and me :)
 

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I'm a big fan of RLO myself. Mr. Horton's advice ain't all that shabby either... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
at this very moment there are the two top woods of my Mk4 1* duncked in a plastic container filled with RLO, and the forestock soaking up a coating every few mins in the sun

me thinks they are very happy!
 

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A lot of folks use the RLO. The only problem usually mentioned is that it takes a long time to dry and form a hardened, cured finish, and often leaves a stock sticky and damp to the touch.
BLO is the basic linseed oil/flax oil with chemical dryers added to it to help it dry quicker and form a hard finish. I use BLO, sometimes thinned with turpentine or mineral spirits in a 50/50 mix, and rub a nice coat on the wood, let it sit about 10-15 minutes, then rub it down and allow to dry overnight. I usually do not do more than 3 coats, just enough to put a protective, yet dull military finish on the furniture. The interaction of oxygen in the air and the oils/dryers of the finish is what causes the hardening of the finsh, so that a nice, not necessaryily shiny, finish results that protects the wood and looks good. Oil soaked wood, still damp and sticky to the touch, and not drying after a long time hanging is a finish that is not cured, and on a rifle is not the proper or desired end result in a wood finish. After your soak in RLO. wipe it down with rags, discard rags in a bucket under water, as they can self-combust and self ignite from the drying oil and cause a fire. Alow the wood to hang in a cool, dry location for several days or weeks until dry to the touch and not sticky or damp. That is when the finish will be cured.
Regards,
DD
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
owwww BU%$ER!

i had heard somewhere about the 50/50 mix, i duncked the top wood for about say an hour + in pure undiluted oil.

and simply wiped on the oil on the outside of the forewood as i was unsure if to soak the inside of the wood, is it ok to do that or should i leave alone or use 50/50 mix in there

well guess i wont be useing that rifle for a long while :)

hey not to bad i get to spend time with my LB

cheers for the advice
 

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The purpose of applying pure raw linseed oil (RLO) is to allow it to penetrate deeper into the wood and help the wood to swell to its ordinal size before the bedding problems started.

When applying today’s boiled linseed oil (BLO) it will not penetrate as deeply because of the chemical dryers and the speed at which it dries. The chemical driers speed the drying time for the BLO on the outside of the stock AND the inside of the stock.

After the stock soaks up the RLO you can put BLO, Tung oil or the finish of your choice. Starting around 1940 permission was granted to use pure raw linseed oil in place of actual boiled linseed oil (No chemical driers added) which was polymerized by heating and dried quicker than raw linseed oil. A war was in progress and the heating resources could be used elsewhere rather than helping oil dry.

Below is a photo from another forum, the photo is labeled Cosmo-Soaked stock,(Horse hockey) this person did not do any research on how the stocks were hot dipped in raw linseed oil for 30 minutes and then dripped dried.

RTFM




Below are three types of Linseed oil, pure raw linseed oil, actual boiled linseed oil, and linseed oil with chemical driers and additives (BLO) Ed has done his home work!

 

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The 50/50 mix will soak in faster, but the undiluted oil works just fine. You want it inside and out.
 

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When I was a lad, I bought an untreated canvas tent at the "Army/Navy" store for cheap and was told to soak it in Linseed oil for water-repellancy. I put the small tent into a 5 gallon can and soaked it overnight with Linseed oil. Checked on it the next morning and found a smoking, charred tent. I've a great respect for any oil-soaked material.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks for all the info,

I lightly and i do stress lightly used some steel wool and turps, just to get rid of what ever the sheen was on the woodwork befor soaking the wood. the result is incredible, it still has the dark marks from being a rifle born of a world war but the colour is just amazing, and i have to say the smell aint that bad either!

i will let it dry a couple of days befor the next dip but well worth the effort.
 

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Is this formula acceptable???

I read a suggested formula of 2/3's "pure raw linseed oil" and 1/3 "pure gum turpentine" to slightly speed up the drying process.

Does this sound correct? I'd like to know the advise of the forum before I start my
"fall refreshing" project on my 1918 BSA No1 MkIII "star barred out".

Please help with the following question...would this process be appropriate to help preserve a 1944 K98 Mauser (dou. 44 "bringback")? The laminate stock is "bone" dry and has almost a "powder flat finish". I don't want to do anything that may effect the "red glue" laminate stock in a negative way...I'm "old school" so I prefer to "First, do no harm".

Thanks in advance for all comments and suggestions.
all the best,
Ron
 

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Please help with the following question...would this process be appropriate to help preserve a 1944 K98 Mauser (dou. 44 "bringback")? The laminate stock is "bone" dry and has almost a "powder flat finish". I don't want to do anything that may effect the "red glue" laminate stock in a negative way...I'm "old school" so I prefer to "First, do no harm".
The diluted RLO probably wouldn't hurt, but I'd just rub some straight RLO on it and let it soak in (repeat if the wood really drinks it in), then wipe it down and call it good. Less is probably more in this case.
 

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A lot of folks use the RLO. The only problem usually mentioned is that it takes a long time to dry and form a hardened, cured finish, and often leaves a stock sticky and damp to the touch.
BLO is the basic linseed oil/flax oil with chemical dryers added to it to help it dry quicker and form a hard finish. I use BLO, sometimes thinned with turpentine or mineral spirits in a 50/50 mix, and rub a nice coat on the wood, let it sit about 10-15 minutes, then rub it down and allow to dry overnight. I usually do not do more than 3 coats, just enough to put a protective, yet dull military finish on the furniture. The interaction of oxygen in the air and the oils/dryers of the finish is what causes the hardening of the finsh, so that a nice, not necessaryily shiny, finish results that protects the wood and looks good. Oil soaked wood, still damp and sticky to the touch, and not drying after a long time hanging is a finish that is not cured, and on a rifle is not the proper or desired end result in a wood finish. After your soak in RLO. wipe it down with rags, discard rags in a bucket under water, as they can self-combust and self ignite from the drying oil and cause a fire. Alow the wood to hang in a cool, dry location for several days or weeks until dry to the touch and not sticky or damp. That is when the finish will be cured.
Regards,
DD
I totally agree with you. I have used a BLO/Turpentine mix for forty years since my dad showed me how to do it. It used to be called a piano or English finish as that is what the piano makers used. I hand rub it into the wood, remove all wetness with a coarse rag and do it again later. The old formula was application once a day for a week, once a week for a month and later as needed. The nice thing about this finish is if you scratch the wood, you can remove it with another application. The smell and Hoppe No. 9 both bring back many fond memories.
 

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Interesting...
I would have thought that Boiled Linseed Oil is just as it says.
Raw oil would have a percentage of moisture ( H2O) and heating it up would evaporate this moisture off hense "Boiled" and when rifles are soaked in heated vats of "Raw LO" . they're technically treated with BLO...
Here I go thinkin' again...
 

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Interesting...
I would have thought that Boiled Linseed Oil is just as it says.
Raw oil would have a percentage of moisture ( H2O) and heating it up would evaporate this moisture off hense "Boiled" and when rifles are soaked in heated vats of "Raw LO" . they're technically treated with BLO...
Here I go thinkin' again...
To my recollection (which may not be correct), that's the original concept behind BLO. As I understand it though, modern BLO is made with chemical drying agents.
 

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If you boil Raw Linseed Oil the heating process creates long molecular chains that interlock with each other to give a better waterproof finish when dry, interlocking your fingers will give you the idea behind this.

Today time is money and Japan driers and alkaloid resins are added to Raw Linseed Oil to speed up the drying and the resins to create the interlocking bonding affect. Prior to this the raw linseed oil was boiled in large air tight pressure cookers, if it is boiled in an open pot the linseed oil becomes thicker because of the loss of volatile liquids.

Prior to the petroleum age Linseed Oil was the number “1” product on firearms, if you add beeswax and turpentine to the mixture you get your great, great grandmothers furniture polish. If great, great, grandpa was a good boy and the wife let him use some of “her” furniture polish he could water proof his flint lock rifle.

“Real” triple mix is RLO/Beeswax/Turpentine

And kiln dried wood will continue to shrink if not protected with an oil finish :eek:

 

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Very interesting thread. I think I might try some of these techniques on some of my Enfields. They could sure use some work on the wood.

And I have a question for you all. I have a No.4 that has what looks like dried on cosmo on some of the metal and it is really on there. Does anybody have a method of getting that gunk off.
 
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