Gunboards Forums banner
41 - 53 of 53 Posts

·
Copper Bullet member
Joined
·
1,446 Posts
So what's inside the broomhandle stock? Inquiring minds want to know. I like that dark brown leather on it, mine is tan and looks to new.....cause it is.
Supposing that you are asking a serious question and really DO want to know - it is the actual pistol that goes inside the stock.

Surprising since you have one that you were unaware of this...

tac
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
moved

madcratebuilder - i moved over to Military Handguns (above link) and posted a better picture of my Broomhandle to avoid further remonstrations. :D I don't mean to leave you hanging here if you want to edit and join me there.

These are sort of "horse pistols."
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,265 Posts
Karl, the guns in your old picture reminded me of one of those "what is it?" posts that was in the collectors forum several months ago. The strange looking gun in question turned out to be a late 19th century harpoon gun, manufactured in New England and finding their way, in quantity, to Alaska. Might be what we're seeing in your picture too. They are Black powder guns so they fit in this forum, they just fired a different kind of projectile.
http://www.whalecraft.net/Shoulder_Guns.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
that too

Elmer - We have a bronze bomb-lance gun like your link in the State Museum here. I agree that it could be something like that. I personally still believe that it was a sort of large blunderbus or what did they call them, punt gun? We also have huge flights of migratory birds come through this area. I live on the Mendenhall Wetlands and between the squawking geese and morning shotgun alarm clock I am constantly reminded of this. I am sure that the Tlingit would have treasured a gun to harvest these ducks and geese too. It is hard to be sure from these old pictures. My office is one floor above the State Archives so I'll try and check to see if they have any more or better photographs of this gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
Sea service pistol

Back in the 80's, Dixie Gun Works was selling this as a kit for a "Tower pistol", $60. I've modified it considerably. First of all, I shaved down the forestock to the way it should be (not looking like a 2x4). I thinned out the grip and carved in the beaver tails. I replaced the trigger guard, and the ramrod pipe is a repro Brown Bess pipe.

It wouldn't spark worth a darn, so a blacksmith friend of mine brazed a piece of file steel onto the face of the frizzen. That was, and still is, an authentic solution.

Smoothbore of course, .60 cal., ordnance grade.

The belt hook was stolen from another pistol kit, where it was not needed.

There's an original British sea service pistol very close in length and proportions in the museum at Fort Niagra, NY. Of course I looked at it while I was working on this.





I use this as a re-enactor's piece for everything from F&I War to War of 1812. I expect pistols like this also found their way out in the Westward Expansion. I normally just shoot paper cartridge blanks with it, but I have also fired live ball and it's fine out to about 30 feet :D

It's a really cheap lock, with a "Tower" stamp, but it has been reliable over the years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Here's my 2cents worth, my blunderbuss. It's an early 19th century gun. A lot of these were coach guns. But, you never know where they were. This was found in Canada.
 

·
Gold bullet with Oak Clusters member
Joined
·
15,560 Posts
I was watching the History Channel “Pawn Shop” and a guy brought in an original 1750 Blunderbuss in very good condition. They even test fired the gun. He traded the Blunderbuss for $2,500 store credit to buy his girlfriend a ring.

History is wasted on the youth. :D
My head hurts
 
41 - 53 of 53 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top