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They are available from time to time, but they aren't usually cheap. Expect to pay around $1200-1500 for a poor quality revolver and much more for a mint gun. They used to show up from time to time for reasonable money, but those days are pretty much over.

David Rachwal currently has a 1937 gun for sale for $1650
http://www.handgunsoftheworld.com/page/page/4114971.htm


The other thing is thats Point's right, one reason they are hard to find is I have taken a lot of them off the market. I think I currently have 11.
If you want more info on these look at:
http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?t=64918

Joe
 

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Quote from Jleiper,
The other thing is thats Point's right, one reason they are hard to find is I have taken a lot of them off the market. I think I currently have 11.


Hi Jleiper,

I have bought two Nagants from my pal, I know he bought the Nagants for $39, he encouraged me to buy a few too at the time.
I could have bought a 22 & a short barrel revolver for the same dealer at a show for $70 out the door!

Nowthat gas is cheap a few of us,can drive out to see you & wax your examples.
If four of us come out it should only take about a week !
LOL

Be well,
point6
To wax the .22's you gotta help wax the rest, plan on longer or bring more!
Seriously, I have bought .22s for from $150 to $2500 and I have found short barreled guns for as little as $115 and it turned out to be experimental as well! That one came off the same table as my cut away.

The hardest .22s to find are the ones with the Tula Commercial mark.
View attachment 133638 View attachment 133639

And after that the extended barrel versions
View attachment 133637
The upper gun is a .22 the lower a 7.62.


Joe
 

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Morning jleiper,

I picked up my first M-1895 (a 1944 Izzy) about year ago and just in the past few months started to reload ammo for these unique revolvers. In the past two months I've purchased two more -- a 1926 Tula and 1938 Tula.

Good ammo supply means that they are going to the range with me quite often ! ! And a very nice addition to my M-N rifles too.

Do you forsee these revolvers "drying up" in the near future ? ? If so, should one consider picking up a couple more -- while still available and cost-effective ?

Thanks ! !
As far as I'm concerned they have already dried up. Finding non-rearsenaled guns has gotten to be very difficult in the last few years. I now find them in collections and estates that are being broken up - and that means paying real money for them.
Re-arsenaled guns will get harder to get and the new ones with that really UGLY import mark are making them less desirable. The supply of cheap Nagants cannot last forever. However, the biggest danger will be the new administration banning imports of "surplus" guns. Remember that while we like the fact that they are cheap, that low price makes them a "Saturday Night Special" in some peoples eyes! If you want more, buy them soon.

They are still fun to shoot, but to a collector they are getting harder to find. I still need about 100 guns to "complete" my collection and don't expect to ever accomplish it.

Joe
 

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Both guns are interesting but gunsmith conversions. Especially interesting is the one with the gas seal type conversion. I would consider both guns fairly priced.
Note that he also has 2 Swedish .22 conversions. Most important - look at the 1910 swing out cylinder gun!

Joe
 

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The separate number on the right side of the gun is the conversion number. It should match the number on the cylinder. The 36 is the date of the conversion. The guns numbered this way after about 1928 were converted at the Tula factory. I assume that the date on the side plate is 1936 as well? That is the first year of factory conversions from new guns. 1937 seems to be the most common.
Almost all of the factory conversion guns are double action. There are only a few guns converted from Imperial guns that are single action.
If the cylinder of the gun is original it is not a true gas seal cylinder. The cylinder merely moves up to the face of the barrel stub. I have seen only one .22 conversion where there were interlocking surfaces on the face of the cylinder and the barrel face to create a gas seal.
View attachment 133841
A real gas seal cylinder for a .22 Nagant (Courtesy CollectibleFirearms.com)

I have no idea what the M is. I have something that maybe similar on a 1937 conversion. My other 37 doesn't have this mark.
View attachment 133843
An 'M' over the K?

Joe
 
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