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i want to start reloading. i have been reading posts about presses. it seems to be an often stated opinion that redding or forster are the best. i would like thoughts from reloaders on why those two brands are better. it could be they are better in a way i will not benefit from. i shoot mostly mosins and some 30-06.
cabelas has rcbs rock chucker supreme (with stuff) but i won't buy it until i hear from people who know what they're talking about. i want loads as accurate as i can get them. thanks.
 

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The Rock Crusher is a good press. Accurate loads will depend on the precision of the Reloader with his case preperation, powder measurement. and seating. Buy several Reloading Manuals and read them again and again.
 

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I've used the rock chucker for over 30 years, no complaint. Most all reloads are better than factory at accuracy.
 

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I think that any choice of press would work. However, myself I like cast iron presses. Redding has to me always had a superior name when it came to dies, particularly their seating dies. Recently other manufacturers have been making dies that have many of the same features the Redding's have. I think you would be very happy with the press from Cabelas. Like Tens posted reviewing different loading manuals, learning the what's, why's and how's of producing quality ammunition are what any beginner should do.

I've been loading or 40+ years and have never used a Redding or Forster press or dies, just RCBS, LEE, Hornady and Dillon.
 

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I'm very new to reloading and just went through the typical list of dumb questions which I asked.

I chose the RCBS rock chucker master supreme kit. When I received it, I was extremely happy with everything.

If I had to do it over again, I would buy the same exact kit w/o a doubt. I think they should change the name from rock chucker to rock crusher as this cast iron press is built like a tank.

I was thinking of a (lee and then the redding) turret but I am glad I didn't go that route as it isn't needed, imo. I don't see how anyone could ever wear out a chucker.

Advice given to me before I bought mine was buy the powder b4 the press. So, if you know what powder you need you best start looking now.
 

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Repost your question in the 'Reloading-Handloaders-Digest' http://forums.gunboards.com/forumdisplay.php?63-Reloading-Handloaders-Digest you will get responses from very knowledgeable people. But just clarify, you realize you just ask if you should buy a Ford, Chevy or Toyota...

My two cents, buy reloading manuals and read, reread and read some more before spending any more money. It will save you money!

grey
 

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I've used the rock chucker for over 30 years, no complaint. Most all reloads are better than factory at accuracy.
Same here. Never had any trouble with the rock chucker. Been using mine for over 30 years too.
 

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I use a RCBS Rock-Chucker press and Lee dies exclusively. One significant difference between the Rock-Chucker press and other models is that the Rock-Chucker operates with an "over-center toggle" mechanism, which applies significant additional ram pressure at the very end of the stroke - when it travels over the toggle. Other presses exert similar pressures at the end of their stroke if you require it; however, they rely upon the operator's strength to exert the pressure and not the toggle. Depending upon what reloading function you are performing, it is sometimes not recommended to exert an "over-center toggle" mechanism's force. As an example -- when reforming fired brass back to standard size the die components seat between the outside bottom of the case, on the case holder and the top of the web which is inside the case; a strong "over-center toggle" used here is normal and appropriate because the web is strong enough to be compressed with normal "over-center toggle" force. However, if you use this press to "neck-size" or "crimp" brass in neck-sizing or factor-crimping dies you would be best advised to not use an "over-center toggle" press for these actions because you run the risk of deforming you die components because of the significant final strength of the "over-center toggle" mechanism. I do use the same press for all functions and here is how I do so -- for normal brass forming I use the "over-center toggle" technique and for the other actions I set the final level of my die so that it never reaches the toggle point. This is done by dropping your "over-center toggle" press handle to its lowest position (highest point of the ram) and then running your die in until it contacts your shell-holder. Then raise the handle and run your die approximately 3 to 6 turns further down into the press threads or until it causes the handle to stop before it reaches the "over-center toggle point". The final position of the handle then becomes a question of how tall you are, relative to the handle and at what point it is most comfortable to exert the necessary pressure you need for the action you are performing. This way you apply the pressure totally as function of your own strength and you never ask the ram handle to enter the "over-center toggle" portion of the stroke. A word about dies -- RCBS and other manufacturers make fine dies; however, I have discovered that the most consistent manufacturing quality comes from Lee, in Hartford, Wisconsin. Besides the assured quality, Lee uses "O" rings below their "hold-down" nuts which permits you to reach the final position you need - and the "O" ring holds the die tightly in-place, there - and you do not have to then tighten a set-screw, as is often necessary with other manufacturers dies. Die threads and press threads are standardized among all manufacturers, as far as I've discovered, so you can interchange among them as you wish. Just drop me an E-mail line if I can help you with any other issues. Enjoy your hobby, I certainly do.
 

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I believe the RCBS Rockchucker press is about the best out there. It will never wear out. I have been reloading for around 50 years and I've used them all. Some are good, but the RC seems to be the best for me. I do a lot of case forming from other cases and the RC, with it's distinctive and exceptional mechanical advantage reforms cases with very little effort. As for dies, the best dies as far as I am concerned and from my extensive experience, in regard to quality, style, and ability to produce the most accurate reloads are, in order Redding, Lyman, RCBS, and Hornady.I would stay away from Lee dies for the following reasons: The "O" ring lock nut, the collet system of holding the decapper/expanding shaft, the lack of knurling, and the over all cheap quality of the die. As far as the decapping/expanding shaft of the Lee system, it will occasionally fail and it is a real pain to constantly be tightening the damn thing.
7x57guy
 

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From what I understand the pain in the butt having to retighten the decapping collet was designed that way so the pin doesn't break. I would rather know that a design feature really works vs. snapping a pin and having to buy the entire die again. I could be wrong about this stuff but I like Lee dies and many people have used the same ones for decades. just my 2 lincolns.
 

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From what I understand the pain in the butt having to retighten the decapping collet was designed that way so the pin doesn't break. I would rather know that a design feature really works vs. snapping a pin and having to buy the entire die again. I could be wrong about this stuff but I like Lee dies and many people have used the same ones for decades. just my 2 lincolns.
Funny thing, I never break a pin with my other dies that don't have this "design" feature, and I have used some of these dies for many years. And, I don't have a problem with the shaft slipping as I have had with Lee dies. I don't see how this can be an advantage. If Lee has sold you on this "feature" then their marketing people are successful. The fact is that is is one less part they have to thread thus saving pennies in machining costs.
7x57guy
 

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pete, don't take this stuff from the reloading hobbyists too seriously. From a money standpoint you are probably better off buying a cheap Lee setup without all the automated bells and whistles and finding out if you like, or can stand the repletion of, reloading. if you really get into it then acquire something better.

FYI I have an old model Lee Anniversary loader and for the oddball and varied stuff I reload and my now minimal shooting it has served me just fine, and saved me a ton of money. If I'd gotten into competitive shooting I'd certainly have bought one of the fine reloaders recommended in this thread.
 

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pete, don't take this stuff from the reloading hobbyists too seriously. From a money standpoint you are probably better off buying a cheap Lee setup without all the automated bells and whistles and finding out if you like, or can stand the repletion of, reloading. if you really get into it then acquire something better.

FYI I have an old model Lee Anniversary loader and for the oddball and varied stuff I reload and my now minimal shooting it has served me just fine, and saved me a ton of money. If I'd gotten into competitive shooting I'd certainly have bought one of the fine reloaders recommended in this thread.
+1

grey
 

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I've been reloading for close to 50 years. Have the Rockchucker which has been cycled I don't know how many times. Every so often take it apart clean and grease the pins and lightly oil the ram. Best money I've ever spent for a press. I also have an old cast iron "C" press from Pacific that has also been used a lot. And also have a lee classic cast press that has been used a lot. I save my dillon for pistol ammo. think the lee cost me about $60 bucks when they first came out. Had the RCBS and Pacific so long cannot say what I paid for them. Definitely got my $$$ worth. Frank
 

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The Lee Classic Cast is a great press and will outlive you. I like the way it captures primers in the tube under the press. I've used a Rockchucker many times and its great as well. Either one is a good choice, but I prefer the red one.

I never have an issue with the Lee decapping pin, they never move if you get it tight enough (in my experience with several sets of Lee dies)

Sent from my XT901 using Tapatalk
 

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All good advice. You most likely need a Rock Chucker or the Hornady copy or Lyman copy or Lee classic cast clone of it. If the
funds situation was such that I could only buy a Rock Chucker and a cheap scale vs. a Lee classic cast and a
damned great scale (balance beam), I 'd go the latter route. At entry level the Lee will serve you well and
at entry to expert levels, you can't put a price on what you gain from a great balance beam scale.

You don't need a Redding Big Boss or a Forster Co Ax press at this point in time. Most never need them.

Pete: speed is a demon at the reloading bench. Keep focus on a single stage press like you are now. Don't get
seduced by turret or progressive presses. If you need such presses, the requirement will build and you will know
it when it happens but you'll always need and use a single stage press.

Dies ? This is the Kia vs. Chevy vs BMW thing. Lee vs RCBS/Hornady vs Forster & Redding. There is a difference
in dies but many won't notice it at the rifle range as they don't shoot longer ranges. Unless a die is made wrong, any will
make outstanding ammo (using quality components and careful hand loading) for 100 to 300 yds use. If you press to 600 yds, you'll out grow the Lee Dies and be well served with RCBS and Hornady. If you go back to 1000 yds, at some point you'll be eyeing Forster and Redding dies. I went back to 1000 yds using Lee and RCBS dies for two of my longer range calibers and finally decided that if I really wanted to get into the 9 &10 rings consistently, I had to abandon them and gain Forster dies. Others on 1000 yd line are using Forster and Redding dies so there is something to be learned here and I finally gave in ... and don't regret doing so.

Dies? Buy what you need.
 

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I've been a reloader since the late '60s, and have had RCBS all the way untill I got into Police Pistol and suddenly found that I was shooting between 200 and 300 rounds of .38Spec a session. Four of us got together and bought a whopping great Dillon 'factory' production press - sold at a great profit to the gubmint when we had to hand all our handguns in.

Now I have a Lee turret set up for the small amount of .357Mag that I shoot in my LBR, but I still have my original Rockchucker and its slightly younger brother. RCBS dies, too.

'Go green' - you won't regret it.

tac
 
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