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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My local dealer didn't have any decent Arisakas, so I took a look at a Mosin. A typical 91/30. Big mistake . . . :cry:
It now resides with me, and I need to build an additional gun rack . . . :(
It came with all the extras that you see on the Aim site, including the bayonet. Here's the hitch:
The bayonet gets much too snug to seat far enough on the barrel to clear the front sight and make the 1/4 turn. We're talking less than 1/16 of an inch here, but I don't want to force it and have a permanently attached bayonet.
There are no burrs or gouges either on the barrel or the bayo.

What do you(all) think?
 

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Without exception, all the bayos I have are too tight to place on the rifle. I have one (For show & Tell) that I used the Dremel and a sanding drum to open the inside DIA of the bayo socket until it fit just right and reblued it.
 

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In my experience, I can only get about one in five to actually fit on a rifle. This is very common. A lot of guys drill/mill them out. I don't mount them anyway, so no big deal to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks very much, guys. Since the bayonets on my Arisakas are so loose that they rattle, I thought there was either: a) a problem with this bayonet, or b) I was doing something wrong. (Never happen . . . Hah! )
BTW, just ordered 300 rds of 7.62x54 ammo from Aim. Steel cased and corrosive primed, but the price was right . . .
Any thoughts? (Other than warm soapy water . . .)
 

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Every bayonet I ever put on a Mosin 91-30 never fit. I don't dremel mine to make them fit I usually put them in a vise., get a large screw driver and
spread the socket apart a little bit. This has worked on 5 rifles like a charm and you dont have to reblue when you are done.
Make sure you put a rag around the bayonet in the vice though to keep from scratching it.
 

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So, the question is, what did the Russians do? Whether the bayonets were habitually carried fixed or not, or even if they were sometimes removed and carried reversed when not in action, they still had to go on and off the rifle. It almost stands to reason that there would have to have been some fitting involved. Was there some standard procedure?

FWIW, the Remington bayonet I have for my 1891 Remingtion fits, although tightly, but the locking ring can't be turned down past the sight. It would probably be a minor fix, but I've never tried to either force or file it.
Oddly enough, my 1925 Dragoon was brought back from Japan with a 91/30 bayonet, which may not be technically correct, but fits just fine. I suppose it could possibly be an in-service replacement, picked up by the Japanese along with the rifle, but of course there's no way of knowing. It could just as well have been picked at random out of a pile of them in the warehouse.
 

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I opened mine up with a piece of emery cloth wrapped around a wooden dowel, but left it a little snug. I suppose you could drive a pair of hardwood wedges in from opposite ends of the slot to spring the socket open a bit. I would not use a screwdriver as it might gouge up the metal.

Another thing I had to do was open up the slot that fits around the front sight base in order to get it on. There was a little tweaking with the locking plunger too, but eventually we got it to fit just fine.

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I finally figured out what that egg shaped hole in the handle of the screwdriver accessory tool is for (I think...);

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It makes a dandy wrench for removing a stubborn bayonet!

With the bayo reversed, it won't lock on....

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...and I found that an empty cartridge casing makes a dandy point protector:

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By alligning the socket slot pointing up and to the left, and lashing it on with rawhide or wire, it appears that the reversed socket might make a pretty effective muzzle brake.

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I haven't tried this theory out yet, so you're on your own if you get curious.

Legend has it that the Mosins shoot more accurately with the bayonets fixed; I have experimented with this theory and found that on SOME rifles and carbines it certainly does; one of my M-44s in particular.

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Note how extending the bayo both tightened the groups as well as moved the POI significantly.
It did not seem to have quite as dramatic effect on my 91/30 however.

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...although it did seem to help a little bit.

Someone told me that the bayonet improves the barrel's "harmonics", and that the Russian Marksmanship Teams used to carefully adjust the weight and balance of their bayonets for optimum accuracy, and fire with fixed bayonets during competition.

If your range officers give you flack about fixing a bayonet while shooting, you could get an old bayo, cut off the forward third or so of it, turn the middle third down into a "rod", then thread it so you could place or remove threaded weights or nuts along it to fine tune your harmonics. It would look weird but might pass PC muster a little easier.

Try your rifle with and without bayonet and see if it makes a difference.
 

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This whole thread explains why the M/N bayos were originally serial numbered to their rifles. Once the bayo was fitted and numbered, it would not be mixed up with an unfitted bayo. Also, there are some pictures floating around that show the reversed bayos tied to the rifles as Uncle Jacque suggested. Frank
 
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