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This comes from a 1951 edition of the publication, Convairiety. Published twice a month, the Convairiety, chronicled the day to day happenings at Convair Aircraft Company from 1948 to 1961. Early on, there were two editions, San Diego and Fort Worth.
To me, it appears to be a carbine model -M38 or M44?


Photograph Air gun Shotgun Trigger Newspaper
 
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Excellent find! Thanks for posting. 👍
 

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I wonder why we never see Korean War bring back Mosins of any kind. The odd photo like this pops up but actual rifles don't for the most part. I'm thinking souvenir rifles was a discouraged thing in military back then and hard to bring home. In other words you capture / find a enemy rifle and then what ...you can't carry it with you (you're in a war and got enough weight to hump) and there is no Tag It and send to the rear like in Viet Nam... so perhaps as Korean War ended , those troops there at that time who got a rifle could bring it back but during the combat years there, no way to keep a captured weapon for a souvenir. After WWII there were a lot of weapons to be had for returning GI's to snap up and come home with. Don't think that was the case in Korea , at least not in the volume.
 

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The Tag and send to rear thing in Viet Nam was problematic as heck. If you were in a unit like 1st Cavalry Division that moved often, they flat out moved lock stock & barrel to next hot spot and took essential equipment. Not hauling milvans of captured rifle souvenirs but if you were in unit like MAC V, where you operated out of a camp , then anything captured could be secured and would not be lost. As an Infantry guy, you did not carry a captured SKS with you...not even a possibility so tag it , send it out on a log bird if possible and hope no one steals it in the rear. May lightning and the plague strike those who stole my SKS's sent to the rear, and I hope they suffer for it.
 

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Now that I think about it, I don't recall seeing any m38s in pictures post 1945. Could it be that they were mothballed that quickly by the Russians or is it just me? There's lots of documentation on the post war use of 91/30s and m44s through at least the mid 50s, and of course PUs much later than that, but nothing I can remember for m38s.
 

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Post war, the Russians for a period of time standardized to M44 and 91/30 rifles till SKS began to fill in as the new rifle .. and we know that was halted as the AK was determined to be the future best rifle, rest of that is history . M38's like PPSH and other weapons became secondary reserve weapons as did 91/30's and M44's later on. We know all these got re furbished and stuck in storage. In terms of volume, not many M38's at all but M44's were massively produced. I think the probable reason post WWII of M38's in use being in question is more that they were not that many made, they were sprinkled out in the units
and replaced by M44 quickly after the war. M38's were a limited production / limited issue weapon. Those that survived were saved and stored, just as German 98K were saved and stored. Russians seemed to salvage and save any weapons for any future use.
 

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My father who was in the 24th ID. brought back from Korea a Russian M44. He told me that on several occasions MPs would try to take it from him, but he always had his bring back paper from his CO. I still have his paper, but unfortunately his half brother stole his rifle.
View attachment 3995841 View attachment 3995842
Well now, what a great post this is. It seems my guess captured weapons in Korean War were made difficult to bring back has some truth to it. Soldier is hassled by MP's , on his way home from war and rifle is surrendered...he's more interested going home ! I am sure that scenario was going on. Some soldiers like this example got thru the bottle necks of MP's , customs etc.

In 1946, my father was boarding a ship home from Europe post WWII with a duffle bag of captured pistols. He was a tanker so could secure his loot during the war. He was stopped and asked if he had any weapons and he told the truth. He as informed he could only bring one weapon aboard and had to surrender the rest. My father told the officer (a Lieutenant Colonel, my father a Major at the time) that he'd do that but he'd drop the duffle bag off the fan tail of the boat, he was not letting anyone get his stuff. The LTC waved him aboard. I still have a few of those pistols but he gave a bunch of them away to relatives and friends. In 1970's I began tracking those relatives down & his old football buddies of High School days and got the "What Pistol ?" answer. No one would admit they sold off the gift pistols.

Anyhow, interference to military bringing war souvenir weapons home is not news .
 

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Post war, the Russians for a period of time standardized to M44 and 91/30 rifles till SKS began to fill in as the new rifle .. and we know that was halted as the AK was determined to be the future best rifle, rest of that is history . M38's like PPSH and other weapons became secondary reserve weapons as did 91/30's and M44's later on. We know all these got re furbished and stuck in storage. In terms of volume, not many M38's at all but M44's were massively produced. I think the probable reason post WWII of M38's in use being in question is more that they were not that many made, they were sprinkled out in the units
and replaced by M44 quickly after the war. M38's were a limited production / limited issue weapon. Those that survived were saved and stored, just as German 98K were saved and stored. Russians seemed to salvage and save any weapons for any future use.
That was basically my thoughts as well, 38s must have been thought of as a substitute standard weapon post '45 (in much the same way as the SVT-40) and just didn't see much further use.
 

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Well now, what a great post this is. It seems my guess captured weapons in Korean War were made difficult to bring back has some truth to it. Soldier is hassled by MP's , on his way home from war and rifle is surrendered...he's more interested going home ! I am sure that scenario was going on. Some soldiers like this example got thru the bottle necks of MP's , customs etc.

In 1946, my father was boarding a ship home from Europe post WWII with a duffle bag of captured pistols. He was a tanker so could secure his loot during the war. He was stopped and asked if he had any weapons and he told the truth. He as informed he could only bring one weapon aboard and had to surrender the rest. My father told the officer (a Lieutenant Colonel, my father a Major at the time) that he'd do that but he'd drop the duffle bag off the fan tail of the boat, he was not letting anyone get his stuff. The LTC waved him aboard. I still have a few of those pistols but he gave a bunch of them away to relatives and friends. In 1970's I began tracking those relatives down & his old football buddies of High School days and got the "What Pistol ?" answer. No one would admit they sold off the gift pistols.

Anyhow, interference to military bringing war souvenir weapons home is not news .
I also tried getting my dad's rifle back from his half brother's family, and got nowhere. I know for a fact that he still had it, and that the family does as well. they were, and are still hoarders, and have multiple barns, and sheds full of stuff.
 

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My Uncle takes the cake, a millionaire in 1970, he had a P38 and a 1911 that my father brought home from WWII. He being the kid brother also got the nazi medals, etc etc loot. I asked to buy the pistols back, he sold them to me. All the other loot disappeared along with grand fathers huge gun collection. Funny how amnesia arises when guns are involved !!!

My "VN War & overseas war loot."..no one seems to want to fight about who gets it and that really "T's" me off but that no one cares about my fathers and grand fathers war loot...that hurts deep.
 

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An old member of my infantry regiment association was an NCO in the 7th Infantry Regiment “Cottonbalers” in heavy combat in Korea. He was a gun guy and told me the Chinese would charge in these wave attacks at night then he and his platoon would kill them all with well placed machine gun and mortar fire. He was surprised to find a lot of the dead Chinese were armed with M44s with bayonets extended and only 5 total rounds or less on them.
 

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My Dad worked at Convair Fort Worth on the F16 Fighting Falcon then San Diego on the Tomahawk missile projects. Also General Dynamics Pomona on the Red Eye and Standard missile. RIP Richard!
 

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Well, personally, I've seen quite a few KPA capture guns, all MN. Many were sporterized, with engraving, new sights and stocks, etc. This was the style of the times, as GI's wanted commemorative and hunting weapons, and labor to do the work was really cheap in Japan. Mostly I've seen M44 and M91/30s; I have a KPA capture, a Remington M1891, found in a farmhouse in Korea in 1951, with capture papers.
 

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I wonder why we never see Korean War bring back Mosins of any kind......
I heard/read a story on 'Teh Internets' many years ago that said any Mosins the US/UN Troops tried to take home were taken off them prior to going home and replaced with Type 99s.

Story said this was conducted by the CIA who were trying to surreptitiously arm Tibetan Rebels with untraceable weapons against CCP rule...

True or not? Don't know, but a good story and could go a ways to explain why there are so few Korean War Bring Back Mosins.
 

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I heard/read a story on 'Teh Internets' many years ago that said any Mosins the US/UN Troops tried to take home were taken off them prior to going home and replaced with Type 99s.

Story said this was conducted by the CIA who were trying to surreptitiously arm Tibetan Rebels with untraceable weapons against CCP rule...

True or not? Don't know, but a good story and could go a ways to explain why there are so few Korean War Bring Back Mosins.
I'd say that was internet Bravo Sierra on Steroids.
My policy has always been (LOL ) .......BS Rumors...if you have not heard one by 0900, take charge and release one yourself.
 
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