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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,looking for help really.
Recently i was left a diary hand written in pencil by my great Grandad who served aboaed the H,M,S Kent as a cheif Petit Stoker.It has nearly 30,000 words inside.After reading the diary it has left me with dilemas as some of it contradicts History as we know it,i joined a Naval Forum who turned out to be more pig ignorant than you can imagine.I would ask quetion and they all thought i was trying to catch them out and all i got was snyde replies.Now no-one talks to me on there any more very childish if you ask me.There is one other account of the exploits of the Kent by the Surgeon Dixon which is more like poetry.The Diary tells me where the German Light Cruiser Nurnberg was sunk,by the Kent.Inside there is alot of contradictions to other accounts,it was illegal to keep Diarys then.Inside the Diary it has an Iron Cross stuck on the 1st page he also got the Flag off the Dresed before it sank.I would like to get this Diary published due to its historical value any ideas would be apprecited.i have written and emailed to many Publishers but they all want lots of money to publish the Diary which i wont and cant afford any way.i beleive its contents very valuable. many thanks
 

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If you want somebody to pay YOU for it - good luck in dealing with publishers.

Some of the specialist presses MIGHT be interested in publication. but they aren't likely to pay a significant advance. You might contact such organizations as Schiffer, Presidio Press, Naval Institute Press or maybe one of the university presses. Or the Imperial War Museum. But - diary with around 30K words is pretty short for a book, and a diary is more valuable as a research tool than something that will sell lots of copies if published.

I will note that the diary almost certainly is of considerable value as a bit of history - but curst little in money from what i hav seen when such things come on the market.

I have to say - I must express doubts about the alleged Dresden flag. Thing is, Dresden scuttled (or sank as result of damage inflicted by Glasgow) in 200 feet of water while Wilhelm Canaris was "negotiating" her surrender to HMS Kent and HMS Glasgow, which vessels had caught her off Mas a Tierra (now Robinson Crusoe Island) on 14 March 1915. The ship sank at approximately 1115 hrs local (scuttled and abandoned by her crew), with her war ensign flying (run up at the last minute to replace the white parley flag hoisted after a few shots were fired at her if i recall the accounts correctly). She was never boarded by British personnel prior to sinking according to all the accounts i have seen (including excerpts from the logs of Kent and Glasgow published in one of the accounts I have read; don't recall which of several they were in.

It should be noted that there are conflicting accounts of the end of the fight, including at least one that indicates the British never stopped shooting until the vessel blew up and sank (whether from fires set by hts or scuttling charges a matter unresolved). Account of the Battle of Mas a Tierra (from NY Times, excerpted in Wiki):

The Glasgow opened fire on the Dresden, damaging the vessel and setting it afire. After returning fire for a short period of time, the captain of the Dresden decided the situation was hopeless as his vessel was vastly outgunned and outnumbered, while stranded in the bay with empty coal bunkers and worn out engines. Captain Lüdecke gave the order to abandon and scuttle his vessel. The German crew fled the cruiser in open boats to reach the safety of the island, which was neutral territory. The British cruisers kept up their fire on the Dresden and the fleeing boats until the light cruiser eventually exploded, but it is unclear whether the explosion was caused by the firing from the British ships or from scuttling charges set off by the Germans. After the ship exploded, the British commander ordered his ships to rescue any survivors from the Dresden. Three Germans were killed in action and fifteen wounded. The British suffered no casualties[/I]
 

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orbeahermanos,

Diary's are precious and would love to have one, especially from a relative. I have a photo of the S.M.S. Leipzig coaling in Guaymas, Mexico on 8 Sept. 1914, she was part of Von Spee's China squadron.

R,
Beck
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The Glagow opened fire and missed The Orama opened fire and missed the Kent opened fire and put 35 lyadites spelt something like that into her.The admiral of the dresden visited the Kent and Glasgow by Small steamer and the Vice Captain did as well.Ship wasnt scuttled, It Blew up as it was sinking and according to his diary many many more died.
 

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possible that Germans could have taken another flag with them (not the ensign currently flying) and then been captured by the British?
The accounts indicate that the crew abandoned in small boats and went ashore on Mas a Tierra (Chilean territory) and were interned rather than captured by the British. I'm pretty sure

Dresden
had no flag officer (admiral) on board, though I'll have to find some of my books on that series of battles to feel completely comfortable with that..

Edit: Found a German language site describing the battle at Mas a Tierra. It indicates that (a) Glasgow was the British vessel firing on Dresden;
(b) Dresden's captain (von Luedecke) was the senior German officer present;
(c) the only German officer who boarded a British vessel was Wilhelm Canaris (head of the Abwehr from the mid-1930s), the Dresden's Adjutant and intelligence officer. He went aboard Glasgowow and spoke to Captain Luce, who is stated to have told him, when Canaris complained about an attack in neutral waters, and indicated Dresden could be interned, that his orders were to sink or destroy the German vessel and any issues of doing so in Chilean waters would have to be sorted out later by the British and Chilean governments;
(d) the German language account is explicit that before the crew abandoned the burning ship, they opened the sea-cocks and set scuttling charges in the magazines.
 
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