Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
i have one and it is top notch in every way. now in about 2 seconds someone will post and tell you it is not gi and has no history and for the same money or less you can get a "real" m1 etc. etc. etc. all of which is true. but if you want a brand new m1 carbine ao is the way to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes I know about CMP. I am specifically looking at a para model and although CMP does have some they are auction only. I have pretty much decided that I just cant afford the prices on a "real" para so I was looking at the AO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,356 Posts
M1 Carbine ?'s

Hello DeanSchmidt. I agree with SfcRet. Buy an original carbine and get a repro stock. I did and couldn't be happier! I frequently see them at shows, so they're not hard to find. There have even been times when I've seen original carbines with the repro stocks already on them! The AO versions seem very well made but for me only an original will do!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,356 Posts
M1A1 folding stocks

Hello Dean. The stocks that I have seen are pretty much all the same. I got mine from a gunshow. It was new and the dealer threw in a repro sling and stock pouch for $185. Who knows? If you look around you might just find an original stock that someone wants to get rid of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
959 Posts
Let's see...

"Real" carbines from the CMP are sixty years old and the barrels and other parts have considerable wear, not to mention the fact that they're a mix of US and foreign parts and may have been refinished while overseas.

The AO carbine is brand new. The barrel is new. And if you ding it out in the woods, not a big deal--you didn't damage something that was allegedly historic (even though the typical CMP carbine isn't very collectible to a serious collector.)

ALL will go up in value as time passes. Quality firearms always appreciate.

I have several USGI carbines, but if I was looking for a nice shooter to last me a few more decades of serius use, I know which one I'd be choosing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,638 Posts
i agree with mb. ao is a brand new gun. not a used one. it will never be collectible in the sense a gi carbine is and it may not give you an equal woody. but those issues aside it is a better gun for the money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
My "real" Inland carbine from CMP cost $495. It was rebuilt by Benecia Arsenal after WWII, and has all the post war upgrades (type 3 front band, flip safety, adjustable sight). The barrel looks like new, and has almost no muzzle wear, as measure with a wear gauge. Yes, it is a mixmaster, but it will always be worth more than an AO. I will be shooting this carbine for the rest of my life.
If an AO carbine pleases you, than go for it. I would rather have genuine GI, and spend the rest of the dough on ammo and mags.
I picked this carbine out personally at North Store. It has a RockOla I-cut stock, which is a plus to me, and a 6-digit serial number (out of about 2,5 million). The classic green parkerizing is perfect.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
1,363 Posts
It all depends

It all depends on what you want the carbine for. If you are a collector and want it for an investment and because its a piece of history, then the AO does not make much sense. If you just like the M1 carbine design and want it as a weapon then the AO makes better sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
I don't see it that way. My Inland is perfectly functional and has taken it's place as a weapon in my HD assortment. I would always prefer a USGI weapon to a commercial clone with uncertain heat treating and metalurgy.
While AO MAY have ironed out some of the problems they experienced in their early production (loose rear sights, problematical bolt/op slide relationship, loose stock/receiver fit), The USGI carbine was made to Government spec, inspected by Government inspectors, rebuilt by the military, and gone over by the CMP.
I once owned a Plainfield commercial carbine, my first semi auto longarm. It was fully functional, and never gave me a problem, and was a bargain at the time...I sometimes regret having sold it long ago. My friend had an Iver Johnson version which wore away it's cam in the first hundred rounds...
If somebody wants to get an AO and gets a good one, god bless 'em. But, don't try to tell me it is in any way the equal to or superior to a genuine USGI M1 carbine in good shape. It isn't, and never will be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Looks like CMP is REAL busy right now but my paperwork is in and I am in line. There have been some good points made on both sides here but I think that USGI is the way to go. A repo para stock should do the trick although I hear that fitting an individual stock to a gun can sometimes be an issue. The AOs I have seen looked good but I have also heard that there have been issues. Thanks for everyones input.


Dean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,731 Posts
Looks like CMP is REAL busy right now but my paperwork is in and I am in line. There have been some good points made on both sides here but I think that USGI is the way to go. A repo para stock should do the trick although I hear that fitting an individual stock to a gun can sometimes be an issue. The AOs I have seen looked good but I have also heard that there have been issues. Thanks for everyones input.


Dean
You wont be sorry, just keep the stock it comes with. I love the way my repro paratrooper looks. It is not as easy/acurate to shoot as a full stock.

On a side note I asked my neighbor who is a ww2 vet from the 101st who saw a lot of combat, if he prefered a folder or full stock. He liked the folder and said the full stock while being much more acurate
and small in its own right compared to a garand, wasnt as easy to cary. He liked the feel of the repro and said the flex at the pivot when shooting it was just like the originals.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top