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The bolt has a serial number which should match the serial number on the receiver, match the number on the bayonet stud, match the number on bottom of fore end and should match the number on underside of rear sight leaf.

If it does , then that is a righteous No.1 Mk III*. Now...if that is the case (sure looks it ), how is the bore ? I don't see any FTR marks so that rifle seems untouched since WWII and its a 1942 ..its seen use with corrosive ammo so condition of bore might be worn.
 

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I had. 3*** blew out the stock apart...it was in beautiful condition.
shooting it after I took it out of stock...to,clean metal under the wood...
Action screws tight before and afterwards.
I always figured I didn't set it in the stock with a rubber hammed to the muzzle
Excellent Asse red coach wood....
Read something later about?..... rear inside the stock recoil metal added to prevent this from happening ?
Maybe I should have checked the bedding moe carefully?

Had a few.... that one wad the best!
I'm no expert just sharing....random thought experience.
 

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That looks like a nice original Lithgow. If you get it , DON'T take it apart. It will not be the same ...........
^^^^^^^^^^^^this^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

It pains me to see rifles torn down on each passing to the new owner. Unless this is an appearance of rust or other issue in need of addressing, leave it alone!!

Nice rifle. Depends on price, like all things.
 

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For the record, it likely did not have recoil pads fitted from new. May have had them installed later. It's not a red light but this may be important information.
This is a outstanding point ! A rifle assembled in 43 (wood indicates 1943 and action is 42), might have been in that series that did not get the recoil pads fitted and since this rifle does not have a "R/45" or other year with a "R" stamping on stock indicating it was repaired (and pads fitted), this rifle may indeed be a 1943 as Demo stated....no pads and original for a early 1943 Lithgow.

I hope no one tore that front end off or tightened up the bolt in the butt...a Lithgow in the wrong hands is a rifle subject to destruction.
 

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Can someone enlighten me about why a Lithgow shouldn't be disassembled?
And if it does get disassembled.....what to look for?
Somehow any mention of this potential for an issue has eluded me.
I took my 1941 Lithgow apart last night and it is still sitting disassembled on my bench....seems like it came apart easily enough. I did not loosen or remove the buttstock.
Mine has been FTRd since production (wood forward of the buttstock looks newish).
 

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As far as many are concerned, disassembly disrupts the original bedding and is detrimental to original accuracy. To others, improper disassembly will wreck the rifle...and those points both have merit.
As a shooter, and as far as detailed inspection and long overdue maintenance goes, disassembly is a must. So long as the rifle is disassembled and reassembled CORRECTLY taking into account all the quirks associated with the procedure.
Too many think they can toss it onto the bench and start tearing it down like an off the rack rifle from Walmart. They don't have a clue about the damage they are inflicting. They just come to the forums asking what is wrong with the rifle.
 

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As far as many are concerned, disassembly disrupts the original bedding and is detrimental to original accuracy. To others, improper disassembly will wreck the rifle...and those points both have merit.
As a shooter, and as far as detailed inspection and long overdue maintenance goes, disassembly is a must. So long as the rifle is disassembled and reassembled CORRECTLY taking into account all the quirks associated with the procedure.
Too many think they can toss it onto the bench and start tearing it down like an off the rack rifle from Walmart. They don't have a clue about the damage they are inflicting. They just come to the forums asking what is wrong with the rifle.
Thanks for the response.
So the real issue is recklessness? That is a relief. I have been collecting for some time and know now not to force things and to be gentle and patient when it comes to disassembly/reassembly.
 

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Every single milsurp I own I have taken apart and cleaned. Never had any issues with accuracy. A lot of the problem is people not tightening or over tightening of screws. They are made to be taken apart. I have took apart the rifle only to find out rust starting or moisture was trapped. I rather clean it and get rid of the moisture than to have rust in my safe.
 

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As far as many are concerned, disassembly disrupts the original bedding and is detrimental to original accuracy. To others, improper disassembly will wreck the rifle...and those points both have merit.
As a shooter, and as far as detailed inspection and long overdue maintenance goes, disassembly is a must. So long as the rifle is disassembled and reassembled CORRECTLY taking into account all the quirks associated with the procedure.
Too many think they can toss it onto the bench and start tearing it down like an off the rack rifle from Walmart. They don't have a clue about the damage they are inflicting. They just come to the forums asking what is wrong with the rifle.
Home Run JB....hit it out of the park !!! Well done !
 

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I have two - one that is 1919 and the second which is 1941 (or 42 - can't remember off hand). Both have been through their FTR program. I really like them and if the price is reasonable I would go for it. I see that the number on the nosecap does not match the number on the underside of the bolt. I do not know if that means anything or not.
 

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Bedding? what bedding??? Military rifles are designed to be broken down cleaned and reassembled. I never heard such balderdash in all my life!
Sir, you are completely unaware that there is a special sequence involved in taking a No.1Mk III * rifle apart. Failuere to use that sequence does irrepairable damage. If you are now aware of bedding , then you are not familiar with the No.1 Enfield. I am being as respectful to you as I can be...you simply are not aware of what is at stake.

Yes military clean their weapons but they did not tear down Enfields like we did M1, M14 and M16 rifles...Enfields are a different food group.
 

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Sir, you are completely unaware that there is a special sequence involved in taking a No.1Mk III * rifle apart. Failuere to use that sequence does irrepairable damage. If you are now aware of bedding , then you are not familiar with the No.1 Enfield. I am being as respectful to you as I can be...you simply are not aware of what is at stake.

Yes military clean their weapons but they did not tear down Enfields like we did M1, M14 and M16 rifles...Enfields are a different food group.
Why be cryptic about the sequence? I can't seem to find reference to it.

I don't always do a detail strip, but often I have found rust and corrosion under the woodline that needed to be arrested, so I tend to do it at least once to stabilize things. The only exception has been a couple of antique pieces with very fragile wood.
After all.....we are stewards of these historical pieces, are we not?

Last night, I disassembled from the nosecap back, and intend to reassemble in the reverse order, unless somebody sets me straight.
 
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