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Anybody have a good website that shows how pneumatic recoil systems work on field guns? Or diagrams?

Thanks in advance, Eric
 

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Umm, no I don;t know of any web-sites, but expect there is information including graphic on the web. While I generally don't feel really comfortable with Wikipedia, often enough it does have information of utility as long as you are careful and do some vetting.

Note that there are a number of different recoil mechanisms used in artillery pieces, including field guns. But almost all modern guns use some sort of hydropneumatic system with spring assist (especially to help in counter-recoil to return the gun to battery).
 

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Eric,
This is from NAVPERS 16193, Basic Hydraulics, on recoil & counter recoil systems for naval guns. A little antiquated but the basic principles are the same.
Hope this helps.

Regards, Hud
 

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About as simple as you can get.
A 12 inch rifled, breech loading mortar, Spanish American War era, in Fort Desoto at the entrance to Tampa Bay.
The only recoil mechanism I could see was what looked like a big set of coil bedsprings underneath the front of the carriage. No hydraulic dampening visible. I wonder if they used friction dampening or just let it bounce?
 

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I have a field manual on coast defense artillery, the one the Coast Defense Study Group republished a few years ago - unfortunately in a box that hasn't been unpacked since I moved it. It has quite a bit on such things and will tell what the big Coast Defense Mortars had in the way of recoil mechanisms. Now all I have to do is find the right box...
 

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About as simple as you can get.
A 12 inch rifled, breech loading mortar, Spanish American War era, in Fort Desoto at the entrance to Tampa Bay.
The only recoil mechanism I could see was what looked like a big set of coil bedsprings underneath the front of the carriage. No hydraulic dampening visible. I wonder if they used friction dampening or just let it bounce?
yes, that is all that is there for the recoil.
large springs did the job a-ok in 1898.

Dave in tampa
 
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