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Discussion Starter #1
Got this one at Dallas gun show Sunday. Worn on outside, superb bore, tight action. Wood not perfect but pretty sound, much nicer than most Rolling blocks I've seen. Original military
configuration. Marked Modelo Argentino 1879 on chamber, full Remington address, patents
on tang, stock doesn't appear to have been sanded as its thicker than the buttplate.
Are these in .43 Spanish? Has what appears to be the original cleaning rod. Only noticeable pitting I see is a very small area on underside of barrel just behind muzzle and just a bit on two of the bbl bands, none inside bbl. Any idea what these are worth, roughly, as described?
 

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M79 Rem Argentino

They are in calibre 11mm Remington Spanish (the bottlenecked cartridge, not the almost straight taper "Spanish Reformado", strictly only a Spanish cartridge.

The Argentine Remington cartridge is also known as the ".43 Remington", or ".43 Spanish Remington"

Cases are available from Buffalo Arms. (Reformed .348 Win, with lots of head swaging.)

11mm Mauser cases will fit and fire, though they will bulge a little (10/1000 undersized).

Lots of Argentinian collectors have these, and regularly shoot them.

Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics.
 

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M79 Rem Argentino

They are in calibre 11mm Remington Spanish (the bottlenecked cartridge, not the almost straight taper "Spanish Reformado", strictly only a Spanish cartridge.

The Argentine Remington cartridge is also known as the ".43 Remington", or ".43 Spanish Remington"

Cases are available from Buffalo Arms. (Reformed .348 Win, with lots of head swaging.)

11mm Mauser cases will fit and fire, though they will bulge a little (10/1000 undersized).

Lots of Argentinian collectors have these, and regularly shoot them.

Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics.
 

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Re: M79 Rem Argentino

Royke,
Yes, the M79 Argentines were in .43 Spanish... some imports were re-chambered to 11mm Mauser some decades ago, as I recall, and in most cases were so marked. I have one of the re-finished examples... big 'ol solid rifle. Mine has no E.N. markings on the knoxform. I've heard it said that these were actually Venezuelan contract guns. Other sources talk of factory surplus. It's fun to shoot, but I can see why the U.S. government went with the trapdoor... ejection of spent cases is weak. It wouldn't be fun picking them out with your fingernails while under fire.

Victor

"Always carry a firearm east of Aldgate, Watson."
 

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Royke,
Yes, the M79 Argentines were in .43 Spanish... some imports were re-chambered to 11mm Mauser some decades ago, as I recall, and in most cases were so marked. I have one of the re-finished examples... big 'ol solid rifle. Mine has no E.N. markings on the knoxform. I've heard it said that these were actually Venezuelan contract guns. Other sources talk of factory surplus. It's fun to shoot, but I can see why the U.S. government went with the trapdoor... ejection of spent cases is weak. It wouldn't be fun picking them out with your fingernails while under fire.

Victor

"Always carry a firearm east of Aldgate, Watson."

The U.S. Government went with the trap door for economic reasons.

There were plenty of Springfield rifles to convert.

After many were converted there was a period of experimentation where they tried a lot of different things, including Rolling Blocks.

If you can find a copy take a look at "US Firearms 1775-1956" by Major Hicks
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Royke,
Yes, the M79 Argentines were in .43 Spanish... some imports were re-chambered to 11mm Mauser some decades ago, as I recall, and in most cases were so marked. I have one of the re-finished examples... big 'ol solid rifle. Mine has no E.N. markings on the knoxform. I've heard it said that these were actually Venezuelan contract guns. Other sources talk of factory surplus. It's fun to shoot, but I can see why the U.S. government went with the trapdoor... ejection of spent cases is weak. It wouldn't be fun picking them out with your fingernails while under fire.

Victor

"Always carry a firearm east of Aldgate, Watson."
Mine does have the E N marking. I think I might prefer to deal with a stuck case in R B than
Trapdoor Springfield, looks easier to get at.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Got this one at Dallas gun show Sunday. Worn on outside, superb bore, tight action. Wood not perfect but pretty sound, much nicer than most Rolling blocks I've seen. Original military
configuration. Marked Modelo Argentino 1879 on chamber, full Remington address, patents
on tang, stock doesn't appear to have been sanded as its thicker than the buttplate.
Are these in .43 Spanish? Has what appears to be the original cleaning rod. Only noticeable pitting I see is a very small area on underside of barrel just behind muzzle and just a bit on two of the bbl bands, none inside bbl. Any idea what these are worth, roughly, as described?
Any approximate ideas as to value?
 

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RE:43 Spanish Rolling Blocks

The only problem i've ever had with the Remington 43 Spanish is that to make reloading easy in battle, even with a fouled barrel, the chambers are about .375 longer than cases. So for good shooting seat your bullets out.This does have one advantage, you can use the 77 grain powder charge and not have to compress your black powder to get it all in. The old song says Bottleneck cases don't shoot good, this is bacause people compress their powder, do not compress powder with a Bottleneck and it will shoot fine.They said this in 1870 and it's still true today.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Any idea what this neat old rifle is worth? I don't want to sell, just curious as to how I did
on it.
 

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Re: Allin v. Remington

The U.S. Government went with the trap door for economic reasons.

There were plenty of Springfield rifles to convert.

After many were converted there was a period of experimentation where they tried a lot of different things, including Rolling Blocks.

If you can find a copy take a look at "US Firearms 1775-1956" by Major Hicks
Granted Sir. Otherwise, they'd have gone with the Peabody, which the ordnance board judged to be the best new design. However, they did convert some muskets at Springfield using the Remington action. I do not remember if it was at this point or during later tests, but Officer reports from field trials comparing the Sharps, Remington and Allin systems specifically noted the Remington's weak ejection, particularly when fouled, and those opinions would, I assume, count for something. My source is Garavaglia & Worman's book on frontier arms.

Victor

"Always carry a firearm east of Aldgate, Watson."
 

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Re: Argentine worth...

Any idea what this neat old rifle is worth? I don't want to sell, just curious as to how I did
on it.
Royke,
I've seen them offered online at anywhere from $450 for a worn exterior to a whopping $975 for one of the refinished rifles. I think Cherry's had one for $350 recently. I got mine for $395 a few years ago.

Victor

"Always carry a firearm east of Aldgate, Watson."
 
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