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Some years ago while scouring local Flea markets I found an ammo can full of vintage ammunition for sale. Inside were a few interesting pieces such as a stripper clip full of 8mm Lebel, half moon clips with war dated .45 ACP, some vintage commercial .30 '06 Government, a couple of hundred rounds of some vintage military surplus ammo and about 100 Mauser stripper clips. The seller wanted $20.00, I offered $15.00 and the deal was made. Most of the two hundred rounds had a FMMAP head stamp which I later found out stood for Fabrica Militar de Municion de Armas Portatiles, the Argentinian ammunition manufacturer and the ammunition was 7.65 X 53 Argentine. This piqued my curiosity so I looked up what rifles were chambered for this round which logically took me to the various models of the Argentine Mauser. I was immediately attracted to the beautiful and sleek lines of the Model 1891 which truly is a work of art. so, of course, I had to have one. Luckily, I found one in excellent condition with only a couple of dings in the gorgeous wood stock and bonus!, it came with its original matching cleaning rod and a brass muzzle/front sight protector. It also
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came with a leather sling but I have no idea if it's original or not..
 

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I agree with you the 1891 is a very attractive Mauser. I have one myself, not nearly as nice as yours, that I bought when I was a kid way back in 1983 at Navy Arms. I also have a beautiful 1909 Argy, 1908 Brazilian and an 1895 Chilean. The South American Mausers became addictive as they are some of the most high quality and attractive military firearms ever made IMO.
Jim
 

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... I wouldn't want to guess what it would cost to manufacture these today. John. View attachment 3978773
Different times, different production methods. At that time labor cost were cheap, machine costs were high. Today labor cost are beyond calculation, thats why CAD/CAM machines do it for you. Mauser design isn't CNC friendly.
 

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Thought I remember that some of the crestless G-series were sent to Spain. Could this be one?
The picture doesn't seem to show crest grinding, but it does seem to show the newer type rear sight. So I would guess not, unless the rear sight had been changed.

Perhaps we can have a better picture of the receiver ring from the top and the rear sight? I would also like to know if there are any "AG in shield marks on the stock.
 

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Have often thought these as under appreciated and under valued. The ground crest is sad but part of there history and I would love to find an intact one. I also love the bayonets that only add to the elegance of these rifles. I wouldn't want to guess what it would cost to manufacture these today. John. View attachment 3978773
That's a gorgeous brace of rifles!
 

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Hello Sapper740,

Thank you for starting this thread and posting pictures of your Argentine 91.

Some of the "G" series Argentine 1891's were put into service for Spain. This rifle does not appear to be one of those, but I do like to see rifles of the "G" and "H" series prefix to determine which lots of rifles saw service with Spain.

Most of the Spanish used 1891's are in poorer condition ( Yours is in very nice condition ) and still have the original "Gew-88" style rear sight. Your rear sight is the later style.

Thanks again for bringing this to our attention.

Macman
 

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I agree they are very elegant guns. Mine is a later DWM gun from about 1899, with the longer top handguard. I suspect many of these were never issued, and only touched when they were updated for the new sights.

I only seem to run across ground-crest 1891s, so anecdotally the crested ones do seem thin on the ground. I’d love to have one some day.
 

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The Argy 1891s look fast sitting still! Addiction is the right term for South American Mausers, they come with a wide variety of ornate crests and can be found for reasonable money, sometimes like yours in stunning condition. Great score but if I were you I’d look up the address of the nearest Mauserholics Anonymous, you are going to need it!:)
 

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Have 3 1891 Argentine mausers. Two sporters I bought and one 1891 carbine. Still have one or two Argentine surplus rounds dated 1946. The original Norma 1891 Argentine ammo was rated 2900 fps out of the 29" long barrel on the 1891 models. That's treading on 30-06 territory. Some years back Norma lowered the velocity down to about 2500 or so fps. The PPU Argentine ammo still thumps me in the carbine. Still have the 3 die set from RCBS and the case forming die. Used to make cases out of 8mm mauser cases. Beautiful rifles all of them. Frank
 

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To the original question........yes, absolutely with a nice Swedish M96 close behind. They are also one of the most accurate mausers made in my opinion. Love mine.
 

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Highly recommend Colin Webster's book "Argentine Mauser Rifles" published by Schiffer, along with the smaller and less expensive volume "The Mauser Rifle in Chile". also published by Schiffer. Lots of details about the guns, the negotiations, and Latin American politics, international relationships and arms races. I consider Schiffer to be a value leader in publishing arms history books.
 

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I really like these. The ones I've owned and shot were very accurate. My second mauser was a cut down 1891 rifle that maybe cost me $50. I've since replaced that with nice original Loewe and DWM rifles, plus an arsenal spare DWM receiver (both DWMs are crested). Fifteen years ago you could easily find a very nice 1891, like the OP's rifle for $200-250 and I've certainly owned a bunch over the years, but those bargain days are sure past.

The 1891 to me is the best option if you want a pre-1898 shooter. They can be found in awesome condition. The round performs well and recoils less than 8x57.

If you don't already have an 1891, get one. And then clear out space for the rest of the South American contract mausers that are sure to follow.
 

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Highly recommend Colin Webster's book "Argentine Mauser Rifles" published by Schiffer, along with the smaller and less expensive volume "The Mauser Rifle in Chile". also published by Schiffer. Lots of details about the guns, the negotiations, and Latin American politics, international relationships and arms races. I consider Schiffer to be a value leader in publishing arms history books.
Webster's work on the 1891 history is fantastic.

It still cracks me up that they had the audacity to ask why they weren't getting free shipping on the free academy rifles.
 
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