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Very interesting. A quick Google search shows that the destroyer USS Kalk (DD-611) arrived at Tokyo Bay on September 1st and was at the formal surrender on the 2nd. I like seeing these kind of personal markings from US soldiers on Japanese rifles. Any photos of the full rifle?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I didnt take pics of the whole rifle, I was at his shop today. It is something I think he wil GB in the near future in speaking with him, if I go there again next week I will take more pics.
 

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If you're into Japanese weapons maybe you should shoot him an offer. I'm not expert by any means, but Type 22's don't pop up very often especially with neat personal markings like on this rifle. The font looks similar to other rifles I've seen in the Bring Back series of books. Must have been some kind of stamps sailors had access to on board the ships.
 

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Just a note to add to the basic etiquette, I know the word Jap is common in this field of collecting, and in most cases when refering to the guns, flags, helmets ect...its just a abbreviation. But when applied to people such as soldier who got his head mounted on the pole as I read earlier its offensive to hear to people of Japanese ancestry. I understand the word "Jap" was commonly used during the war to refer to the enemy, but it was also used on Japanese Americans during that same time. Most Japanese Americans regard the work "Jap" like African Americans regard the "N" word. I'm not going get on anyones case for the use of this word,just want to let you know that a little consideration will be appreciated. Thanks Okha
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Doesn't it seem odd that a type 22 would have this type of inscription though, since it was from the late 1800's? Any thoughts as to whether it is something one off or something done for the surrender date?
 

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Probably just another souvenir rifle brought back. The owner marked it in a way so it had special meaning for him. I've seen quite a few different rifles marked in various manners. Just about everything old and new was rounded up by the surrendering forces after the surrender in the fall of '45.
 

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A couple of points may be of interest; First there is no Type 22. Its correct Japanese designation is "Murata Magazine Rifle". I know its a bit odd, but there it is, supported by various documents in the Japanese national archives, to say nothing of Dr. Zielinski's book on the Murata rifles and carbines. Second, there were many of these rifles in use in schools by the end of WWII as training weapons and they were confiscated along with everything else and ended up as souvenirs, which has saved them for study.

Frank
 

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I also collect AKs, and am getting into building them, and you'll see a ton of carved up stocks on rifles coming out of the Balkans. So I love trench art. I'm not sure it adds to the value unless you have two people bidding on the same rifle who really like trench art like me. It gives it more provenance, therefore it definitely makes it more valuable in my eyes. That being said, there are some collectors out there who want everything mint condition with not so much as a ding on it, so it really depends on whose buying it.

I'm really interested in seeing more pics of this rifle. I would love to own a Murata rifle one day.
 
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