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Not long ago a refurb 91/30 was posted that had interesting markings on the top of the receiver. Most, myself included, had never seen one like that before, and I believe the theory that it may have been assigned to a training school was put forward. I can't seem to find the link. A very similar rifle sold on gunbroker. Very interesting.





http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=400109762
 

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I was intrigued with the rifle and liked the price too, so I snatched it up quickly. I have no clue what the markings including the "44r" date mean on the receiver. The rifle, however, appears to have Romanian experience by the looks of the stock repairs and being non-matching. It had a cleaning rod though... That Balkan connection attracted me to this one as well. Other than M-91's I haven't seen a 9130 Hex come from there.

ПАМ Ь translates to AMP L none of which mean anything to me. Maybe some member of the forum might have an idea what that acronym means. The "P" stamp was also interesting. This kind of rifle is right up my alley. I love the non refurbs. There does appear to be something resembling a "box" on the shank but it is more like two staples rather than a Ukrainian refurbishment stamp. When I get it, I will scour the rifle for clues.
 

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I was intrigued with the rifle and liked the price too, so I snatched it up quickly. I have no clue what the markings including the "44r" date mean on the receiver. The rifle, however, appears to have Romanian experience by the looks of the stock repairs and being non-matching. It had a cleaning rod though... That Balkan connection attracted me to this one as well. Other than M-91's I haven't seen a 9130 Hex come from there.

ПАМ Ь translates to AMP L none of which mean anything to me. Maybe some member of the forum might have an idea what that acronym means. The "P" stamp was also interesting. This kind of rifle is right up my alley. I love the non refurbs. There does appear to be something resembling a "box" on the shank but it is more like two staples rather than a Ukrainian refurbishment stamp. When I get it, I will scour the rifle for clues.
The "box" stamp is your typical soviet refub mark. The rear sight is pinned, so it was refurbished by the soviets at one point.
 

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I was intrigued with the rifle and liked the price too, so I snatched it up quickly. I have no clue what the markings including the "44r" date mean on the receiver. The rifle, however, appears to have Romanian experience by the looks of the stock repairs and being non-matching. It had a cleaning rod though... That Balkan connection attracted me to this one as well. Other than M-91's I haven't seen a 9130 Hex come from there.

ПАМ Ь translates to AMP L none of which mean anything to me. Maybe some member of the forum might have an idea what that acronym means. The "P" stamp was also interesting. This kind of rifle is right up my alley. I love the non refurbs. There does appear to be something resembling a "box" on the shank but it is more like two staples rather than a Ukrainian refurbishment stamp. When I get it, I will scour the rifle for clues.
That translates to PAM (soft sign). Not AMP L

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pgaplayerless:



Can you provide some more information on your theory? Like, what kind of rifle this stock stamping came from, country, time period and/or any other supporting information? I received the subject rifle and find that it spent it final days in the Balkans-Romania. The bore is absolutely pristine and it appears to have been through one (early) refurbishment in Russia possibly when converting it from a dragoon to M91/30 (or it could have been a prototype) and then found it's way to the Balkans. Your example is exactly like mine except you have a "-2" and mine has a "ъ". It must be an acronym because all translations, varying and mixing capital and small letters either come out to PAM, pAM, Pam, AMP (when in CAPS) or "memory" (all small letters) across the Cyrillic writing countries. Any information would be appreciated.

It's a theory of mine that I mentioned here previously, based on this stock marking which is thought to be instruction school mark:

 

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pgaplayerless:



Can you provide some more information on your theory? Like, what kind of rifle this stock stamping came from, country, time period and/or any other supporting information? I received the subject rifle and find that it spent it final days in the Balkans-Romania. The bore is absolutely pristine and it appears to have been through one (early) refurbishment in Russia possibly when converting it from a dragoon to M91/30 (or it could have been a prototype) and then found it's way to the Balkans. Your example is exactly like mine except you have a "-2" and mine has a "ъ". It must be an acronym because all translations, varying and mixing capital and small letters either come out to PAM, pAM, Pam, AMP (when in CAPS) or "memory" (all small letters) across the Cyrillic writing countries. Any information would be appreciated.

The stamp and the info comes from Ted's site:

http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinMarks01.htm

Line 30^^
 
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