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There are several youtube videos showing various methods. I have used my gas stove holding the case rim with pliers, only the neck needs annealing and it is done based on the color change the brass takes. Keep a container of cold water handy (coffee can or whatever) to douse the brass when ity comes off the flame.
 

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I have annealed cases by placing them base down in a pan and filling said pan until the water is just under the shoulder. I then heat each one with a propane torch until the water starts bubbling around the case and then tip over. Works for me.
 

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I bought a kit that Hornady sells just for case annealing. It comes with shell holders that fit in a standard drill and a temperature sensitive liquid that you put on the case. The setup instructions are more designed for bottle neck rounds. The liquid paste you put on it is a 475F paste that you put slightly under the shoulder. To anneal you need around 650-675F (I believe that's the numbers). The way it works is using a torch (they are very cheap) and make the center blue part of the flame small and put it only on the neck. By the time the heat migrates down the shoulder to the lower 475F sensitive paste the neck temperatures are hot enough to be properly annealed. I have annealed hundreds of rounds using this kit. Actually I only use the paste on the first few and time it till the paste melts and just count off the rest of them.
I tried this same system on the nagant brass, but it doesnt work as well. I'm telling you this in case you are looking on the net for annealing kits. The problem with this round is being straight walled and fairly short compared to any rifle round and that the round sits too deep in the shell holders and I couldn't get the paste far enough away from the flame to really tell if the temps were correct and still see it. So what I have done is basically used the method many use and mentioned by chicagorandy, which is to look for a color change. It is tricky until you know what to look for and if you anneal to much in the lower area you weaken the base. If you are using full length nagant brass there is only a short area that extends beyond the cylinder that get worked extremely hard. But there is also about a half inch into the case that get worked quite a bit from the round being seated so deep. Especially if you are using .311 or .312 rounds. You need some way to hold the round and turn it in the flame evenly and you have to watch for a ring that will appear below the flame area. This basically is the edge of the annealing, but can be hard to see depending on light and eyes. Never put rounds in a pan and stick them in an oven like I have seen some say they do. It will anneal the whole round and you absolutely don't want the base to get annealed. I dump mine in water as soon as I see the ring appear where I want it which is about .5 inch down. The water has nothing to do with tempering the annealed area like some think, it is merely to stop the heat from traveling past the desired area. Realistically, the process stops as soon as the heat is removed. Grab some junk rounds, 38 specials or 30 carbines work great for practice. Put the heat on the edges of the round. Spin it however you can. Count the seconds it takes and watch carefully and usually you will see a distinct color ring appear under the area annealed. If done right, the whole area heated should have a different color than the rest of the round and should be evenly colored, just like any milspec round you see on the market. But like I said, practice on similar shaped rounds that you don't care about. Don't use the expensive nagant brass till you are sure you have it down. Here is a website with some good info.

http://www.kenlightmfg.com/cartridgecaseannealer.htm

Good luck with it and be careful!!
 
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