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An Alternate Look at Handgun Stopping Powerhttp://www.buckeyefirearms.org/alternate-look-handgun-stopping-power

*Another "interesting" study of handgun stopping power. The debate will never end!
At least this one is based on some actual gun vs human statistics (and does not appear to have an objective of "bending" statistics to suit a desired result as many do)

There is some flawed logic in the method that has to be taken into account. While there is a comparison of "head shots" vs "Torso hits" that has to be much more refined and broken down into exact areas of impact and the resulting damage done.
As to "incapacitation" he does make a point between physical and psychological "incapacitation"

"In a certain (fairly high) percentage of shootings, people stop their aggressive actions after being hit with one round regardless of caliber or shot placement. These people are likely NOT physically incapacitated by the bullet. They just don't want to be shot anymore and give up! Call it a psychological stop if you will. Any bullet or caliber combination will likely yield similar results in those cases. And fortunately for us, there are a lot of these "psychological stops" occurring. The problem we have is when we don't get a psychological stop. If our attacker fights through the pain and continues to victimize us, we might want a round that causes the most damage possible. In essence, we are relying on a "physical stop" rather than a "psychological" one. In order to physically force someone to stop their violent actions we need to either hit him in the Central Nervous System (brain or upper spine) or cause enough bleeding that he becomes unconscious. The more powerful rounds look to be better at doing this."

There are many "variables" in "physical incapacitation" where much depends on where it hits and what damage does it do. In a "torso shot" 1/2" either direction could spell the difference between bleeding out in seconds vs little damage from a through and through chest shot.

When talking "neurological incapacitation" (knocking out the central nervous system) with a hit to the "Golden Triangle), several factors to bear in mind.
Lethality and fatality don't matter a wit! Whether or not your opponent dies (at some point in time) from his injury is immaterial with respect to instantaneous neutralization of the threat rendering him "incapacitated".
Also remember, a .22or .25 carries as much kinetic energy as a baseball bat upside the head and the capability to stun the CNS with sufficient force to yield a "knockout" blow.

At least he does not belabor the long hashed and gnashed bullet construction debate with laborious study of JHP vs. ball, ect.
The ever popular comparisons and tons of ballistic gel shot to crap and filmed in ultra slow motion prove little when compared to actual bullet wounds in the human body.
Substitute an old computer in place of a gel block and quickly discover that a hit on the CPU is instantly fatal while a torso shot through the case that takes out the case fan but fails to nick circuitry fails to "incapacitate" but will ultimately prove "fatal".

Back to the old adage: It ain't what your shoot but where you land them!
 

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Interesting article. I love the fact that according to the numbers when it comes to ‘one shot stops’ and ‘actually incapacitated by one shot’ the .32 outshines the .45. I’m sure that will stir up a lot of comments here.

Always remember the two cardinal rules of a gunfight.
#1…Bring a gun
#2…Hit your target
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Also fails to take into account those people trained/practiced in "double tap". As the figures include and are predominantly composed of LEO involved shootings, that number set will obviously be weighted. "Double tap" has long been a training practice for LEO and is still taught and included in training along with multiple shot drills. Once trained and accustomed through rote and repetition drills, it is an unconscious learned response. Even with widely spaced "double tap" hits, there is no way to tell which was the incapacitating "stop".

Nor can this study take into account distance and conditions. Did the "one shot stop" come at a distance of a couple feet and the gun shoved right in the opponents face and a hit to the "Golden Triangle" ? Much depends on where the "one shot stop" hit. Unless correlated with the point of impact, that number is meaningless. In multiple shots with multiple hits, likely all fired in under a couple seconds, which one "incapacitated" or was it the sum of all? Take into account exactly what he said, "physical incapacitation" vs "psychological incapacitation" and again, the number is meaningless unless denoted.

"One shot stop" also does not indicate how long it took to "stop" or how far the opponent "traveled" before stopping, all factors in evaluating the effectiveness.
As in "edged weapon defense" and the "danger zone" (distance wherein an opponent with an edged blade can run and reach you where use of deadly force is justified), did/could the opponent run up and plunge a knife in your chest before dropping "incapacitated"?

I can tell you, "neurological incapacitation" is instantaneous. Crumpled and dropped to the ground like a wet towel and moved not one foot further forward, able to pull a trigger, or anything else.
Lights out! THAT is a "one shot stop"!
 

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Whoever came up with the term psychological incapacitation, never heard it before, has obviously never had a meth addict come at him with a knife or weapon.

They know no fear, feel no pain. period.

Adrenilene will have a similar affect, as seen in firefights in combat.

Also the hist. application of people that use psycho active drugs to get fired up for an battle.

Pumped up on certain drugs, you can blow off a arm or limb and they keep comming at ya.

But, hey, what does reality have to do with a writting a article.

Gives the wanna bees something to talk and debate about.
 

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so what? nobody claimed anything was perfect. But it is a FACT that a lot of people stop after being shot, often with feeble loads, in non vital spots. Physical incapacitation ALWAYS takes too long (ie, 4 seconds plus). So the odds are that IF you stop an attacker, (in time to do you any good) it's cause he psychologically QUIT, not that he was physically incapacitated. 90+% of attackers are NOT "out of it" on drugs, especially if you are not a cop.

you can read the monthly NRA mag's Armed Citizen and see how often all it takes is the sight of the Defender's (ready) gun. Cirillo's book about the NYPD stakeout unit said that only 1 in 7 armed robbers, caught in the act and cornered, made the cops shoot. if you give the attacker a way out, and get your gun NOTICED early enough, you get to save yourself the $50,000+ it's going to cost you if you shoot him.
 
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