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Gold bullet with Oak Clusters member
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Just now getting into the groove with my newly purchased M1A (loaded) version of the standard rifle (wood stock) Looking at taking it hog hunting up on a private preserve that has some really big mutations of the imported Russian Boars. Do any of you experienced M1A guys hunt with the commercial soft nosed ammo like the Norma or the Hornady? any one ever shot any of the Hornady lite mag ammo in their Springfield? thanks for your help. og46
 

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Due to it's SLOW burning powder the Hornady light mag is not recomended for use in SemiAuto rifles. Gas port pressure might be excessive with that load in a semi auto. I would not want to use it in my M1A.

Hornady has discontinued the light and heavy Magnum line due to the new "Superperformance" line...which they say CAN be used in Gas Auto guns.

http://www.hornady.com/store/Superformance-NewAmmo

Still.....I would use any of the other commercial .308 Softpoints and They should do the job with decent bullet placement on any Hog you should encounter.
 

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The general guidelines I have read on different forums concerning ammo in M14's are: bullet weights 125-175 grains, no light magnum ammo, and no exposed lead tipped bullets. That being said, bear in mind that you will always find someone who has shot hundreds of rounds of light magnum 190 grain ammo through his M1A with no problems.

Ammolab mentioned that the pressure might be too high for the gas system with light magnum ammo. The light magnum ammo may not exceed the specs for maximum pressure, but the max pressure of the round may occur later than standard ammo-thereby possibly damaging the gas system or operating rod. Personally I avoid the light magnum ammo because I don't want to risk damaging my M1A. If I need more velocity or a heavier bullet I will use my 30-06 instead.

As to the exposed lead tips, the M14 can be hard on the ammo and deform the tips of soft point ammo, maybe even shearing some of the lead off of the bullet. However, there are a lot of people out there who have shot soft point ammo through their M1A's without any problems. One alternative would be bullets with plastic tips like the Nosler Ballistic tip.

If it were me, I would go with a 165 grain bullet with a plastic tip or a Barnes X bullet.
 

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I shot my first deer with my M1a at 90 yards with iron sites. I shot Winchester soft points, too. My barrel, however, was a Douglas Air Gauged heavy barrel reamed wiith an NM reamer so it could handle .308 and the pressures of commercial ammo as well as the stash of surplus I own. Still I'll bet yours wil be fine with it, too. While I didn't shoot a lot of that ammo (only a few rounds to site it in before I hunted with it) I didn't have any issues but I was unaware of any problems with soft-nose bullets in the M1a. For me it was a matter of being sure the round was appropriate for hunting and didn't go right thorough the animal. The soft point Winchester put that dear down in its tracks like a sack of potatoes. The M1a, while heavy in the field, did an excellent job.

Rome
 

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Watch out for Bubbaized reloads in .308 and 7.62x51. This round is the favorite for those who want to see how much hotter it gets when you use a little pistol powder and it is number one in the blowups I've seen. I wont shoot a reload I haven't done myself and in those I won't use a fast powder that wont overflow the case if I double stroke.
 

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I have fired quite a number of Remington 150gr spitzer softpoints in my Polytechs. Also a box of roundnose 150gr Remington powerpoints. Eats 'em fine.

The 'slamfire' issues are real though. Always load from the mag with any ammo, and especialy commercial ammo.
 
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