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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy --

I am new to Mosin Nagants, but I love the history. I purchased a Finnsh m39 dated 1968 not long ago, but I have not shot it yet. Today I was working the bolt, lubricating and making sure everything was okay prior to taking to the range, and I found it would not feed from the magazine correctly. The problem seems to be that the round about to be loaded is catching under the bolt. If I slide the round forward with my finger the bottom edge of the bolt will catch the round and move it forward as expected.

Am I missing a piece here? Is there something that is supposed to move the ammunition forward so that it will be picked up correctly? Is this an indication that I have something really wrong with this rifle?

TIA,
MileHi, Total Newb
 

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My guess is that there is not enough clearance between the stock and the interrupter/ejector. If the interrupter/ejector is not allowed full movement, feeding and ejection problems will occur. Take the action out of the stock and see if you can spot where these parts are contacting the stock. Sounds like a little careful wood trimming might be in order.
 

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Try pushing the round down past the interruptor, then cycling the bolt once on the empty chamber. It should work then. The Mosin interruptor system does not like single-loading from the magazine; it works much better to just drop it loose into the chamber area and closing the bolt on the round.

It is a push-feed, not a controlled-feed like a Mauser, so you don't have to push the cartridge down into the mag for single loading.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the quick response. Here's what my problem was: I had a trigger lock in place while I was cycling the bolt. The trigger lock pushes the trigger back just enough to move the bolt forward (less than 1 cm), like it does when you remove the bolt. The next round's rim catches beneath the bolt, and the front of the round bumps into the front of the magazine or points up in the air... neither of which is really conducive to smooth feeding.

As soon as I removed the trigger lock, it started feeding properly again.

If anyone has a suggestion on how best to shoot a MN lefty, I'd like to hear that too. ;)
 

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Ditto 7.62x54

Yes, please don't put live rounds into a rifle with a trigger lock. Just never know if the trigger could be accidentally tripped. The trigger needs to be unhindered when the bolt is worked on a loaded rifle.

Sorry, not patronizing you, just would hate to see something tragic happen.
 

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Well, I am not new to Mosin rifles and I have been shooting a 1942-dated SK.y. M39 rifle for some time and this is the first I am hearing about a trigger lock. Where exactly is this lock and how is it engaged and disengaged?

There always seems to be more to learn with these rifles.

Tim
 

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Not a part of the gun, a separate, silly & dangerous aftermarket trigger locking "safety" device.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Don't worry, it would be tough to patronize me: I haven't owned a bolt action rifle before, so it's all new to me. I have a two-piece clamp trigger masterlock that I leave on the rifle when I am not around so no one I don't expect can use it. I don't have a gun safe.

I followed rule #1 (keep weapon pointed in safe direction at all times) when I was working with it. I got into shooting because I was frightened of guns, and that bothered me. I am not now frightened, but I have a very healthy respect for them, since they tend to go bang. I appreciate your advice, safety first at all times.

Thanks!

(reminds me a of Douglas Adams bit: he disengaged the gun's safety catch and engaged the extreme danger catch.)
 

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That's a healthy outlook to have on our beloved arms. They DO go "bang" and usually something either dies or is destroyed when that happens. However, triggers do NOT pull themselves, so if there's an accidental discharge, it was the result of a loose nut behind the stock! :D

By the way, I'm happy that you did not let your prior fear of firearms keep you from them. I just wish EVERY hoplophobic person out there would take the same kind of initiative about their fears and BEAT them, rather than letting the fear control. This really is a rewarding pastime, and it is also VERY integral to our nation's history and beginnings.

If you are concerned about safety, you can simply remove the bolt (pull it all the way back in the action, then pull the trigger to release it from the action) and store it elsewhere, rendering the firearm useless. I prefer not to use trigger locks. Dependence upon a safety device is one of the things that leads to carelessness and an accidental discharge.

If you want to play with the action, to test feeding, get accustomed to the bolt action, get used to the trigger/hammer break, etc, you should invest in some good snap-caps. If that's not an option, you should make your own. Using live ammo to test the action, feeding, etc. is just asking for an accidental discharge, IMHO.

None of the above is meant as an insult, I assure you. Nor is it my intention to belittle or patronize you. Just my own experiences in the wonderful world of firearms, and hopefully they'll be of some use to you.

Also, welcome to the boards.
Mike
 

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Here in the US, certain mentally-challenged persons in the various governments (local, county, state, and national) have the idea that placing a mechanical device to make it difficult to place your finger on the trigger is somehow "safer" than using common sense. The fact that someof these devices are entirely capable of tripping the sear on their own, is considered irrevelant.
 

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I am a lefty too! I have had no problems shooting my MN lefty. It just takes a little getting used to working the bolt.
 

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I am a lefty too! I have had no problems shooting my MN lefty. It just takes a little getting used to working the bolt.

Ditto. I am a "south paw" as well, as it my daughter, and we both shoot bolt action rifles just fine. As a matter of fact, not to instigate a flame but, I had someone tell me that "lefties" are more accurate shooters than "righties" mooooowaaaaaahahahahahaha!!!!


Tim
 

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I'm a 'righty' but find it much easier to manipulate the MN bolt with my left hand when I'm shooting off a bench with the forend supported on sandbags. I vaguely remember seeing a thread somewhere that this method of operating the bolt was actually taught by the Russians.
 

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Just watch the movie "Saving Private Ryan" to see a southpaw work a bolt. Seriously, I was compared to the sniper the last time I was at a range shooting a bolt-action rifle (an Enfield), being both left-handed and left-eye dominant. I grew up shooting right-handed bolt-action rifles and would probably be lost if I had to shoot one set up for a left-handed marksman or hunter. Besides, how many mil-surp's do we see that are for left-handed shooters?

James
 

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If I have to leave a Mosin unattended for some reason, that detachable bolt sure does come in handy.
 

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Ok, sure does. I usually am always there though. No gun lock for me! Safe is the best.
 
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