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Sandlapper, bodes, astack 18 ------ Thanks you all for your comments and the estimated value of the Carb. The bore and muzzle are very good, the muzzle is mirror bright. I'm not up very much on terminology for carbines so please enlighten me on "a high wood stock" . Sand -- I remember those days when carbines were going for $19.95 from the DCM. Sure wish I'd gotten one back in the mid 60's like you did. However I did pick a very nice Springfield M1 Garand from DCM for as I remember $92.00 in the early 90's.
I was issued a M1 Carbine when I was a guest of Uncle Sam's army back in the mid 50's. I sure liked the little piece back then. I had to turn it in and was issued a M1 Garand after a few months. I missed that little carbine tho.
Your rifle serial number falls into the second Standard Products manufacture run which ended in January 1944....Early '44 was the time they switched from high to low wood buttstocks....Bodes
USCARBINECAL30M1.com


Here's a picture of a "high wood" stock
 

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According to resources such as Craig Riesch, Scott Duff and Larry Ruth, the Type III stock (low-wood/oval cut) was introduced in mid- late 1943 (I have an original Inland - my US Navy Dad's unused bring-back with papers! - with barrel date 9-44 that has the Type III stock), whereas the barrel date 12-43 and s/n of this gun indicates actual production in approximately January 1944. The visible parts that he has photographed are consistent with that approximate production date, although it would be even better to see configuration and markings on internal parts that are easily accessible with a one-minute field strip.
The low-cut stock may have been first introduced in 1943, but per this site states most manufacturers didn't until January 1944....Bodes

RJ Antiques — Quality Militaria
 

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bodes / Only ----- It most likely doesn't make any difference at this point. I remembered back about 50 years ago when I was still shooting my Std. Prod. M1 carbine the small button that locked the slide open wasn't catching every time in the small hole in the receiver on the last shot. I bought another slide, pulled the original slide out and installed the one I had just bought that held the slide back. That is the one with the "circle P" that is still in the M1 and was photographed yesterday.
I went to my gun parts box and dug out the original slide and took a photo of it just now. It has the "circle S" in the well of the slide and the number "85" stamped on the bottom of the slide. There is also the letter "M" stamped on the upper right flat edge of the slide as seen in the photo too. Take a look at the photo below. Next time I field strip the M1 carbine I most likely replace the slide that is in there now with the original slide.
It's all good....I had thoughts the slide looked a tad bit fresher than the rest of the surrounding parts....My only regret now is this fine rifle is sitting in your gun cabinet and not in mine....Cheers, Bodes
 
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