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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
You may have seen where I recently bought a Spanish M1895 Oviedo carbine. I bought that without a bolt after I had searched for and found a bolt for it.

The bolt I got looked OK but I found that when the safety was applied it would not stay in a detent*. The safety was free to flop around to any of the three positions and would stay in none of them. I found the cause was that someone had removed metal - way too much metal - from the front of the cylinder on the cocking piece. Removing metal from this location is sometimes required to fix a safety which will not rotate, but only a tiny amount of metal needs to be removed.

What is not widely known about this condition* is that if the trigger is pulled while the safety is on, the lug on the bottom of the cocking piece will move over the sear above the trigger, holding it down. Then when the safety is turned off, the firing pin will jump forward and the gun will fire (if loaded). That's not the kind of "safety" I want to have.

Numrich had an M93 cocking piece for $6.05 plus $4.95 shipping and I bought it. After installation I found that the safety would not rotate. I have encountered this before on other Mausers and fixed it by removing a tiny amount of metal from the front of the cylinder on the cocking piece.

This time I switched unmarked cocking pieces between the carbine and an M1893 long rifle. No luck, now the long rifle safety would not rotate. I could have tried switching parts with other guns but that was not really convienent.

Before I got out the file to work on the new cocking piece (back in the carbine bolt now), I made a discovery. On the carbine, with the bolt closed, the bolt would move forward a tiny bit if I pushed forward on the bolt handle. That tiny bit (less than .5mm) was just enough to allow the safety to rotate. When the bolt with the safety was pushed forward the cocking piece did not move.

Problem solved. To engage the safety on the carbine, all I had to do was push forward on the bolt handle while rotating the safety. That's not too much for me to do and in my opinion is better than filing on parts. Of course the safety turns off normally whether or not the trigger has been pulled.

This will probably not be the case on all Mausers on which the safety does not rotate. Tolerances may be different, but it is worth trying to push forward on the bolt if the safety does not rotate.

Regards,
Bill
 

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The cocking piece contacts the sear only. I'm not sure what filing on the front would do. Lighten it for faster lock time perhaps. You would have to widen the notch that the safety lever rides in. If I'm understanding you correctly.(its early) :)
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
The cocking piece contacts the sear only. I'm not sure what filing on the front would do. Lighten it for faster lock time perhaps. You would have to widen the notch that the safety lever rides in. If I'm understanding you correctly.(its early) :)
"The cocking piece contacts the sear only" when the safety is not engaged. When the safety is rotated to the 12 o'clock or 3 o'clock position, the cocking piece contacts the safety only and has been moved back from the sear by the safety.

The position of the front of the cocking piece cylinder is critical. If it is too long, the safety will not rotate. If it is too short, the safety detents will not engage. Tolerances of the trigger pin holes in the receiver and sear, the bearing surface of the sear, and the bearing surface of the cocking piece can combine to locate the front of the cocking piece cylinder either too far forward or too far rearward. If the cocking piece is too far forward, removal of a tiny bit of metal from the upper part of the forward face of the cocking piece cylinder can fix the problem. Or, as I just found, it may be possible to avoid the problem on some guns by pushing the bolt forward while rotating the safety.

Now -- I wonder what the ability to move the bolt forward slightly when closed has to say about headspace? I just now tried the safety application sequence with a dummy cartridge in the chamber. It works the same with a cartridge but without measuring it seems like the movement with a cartridge is less than without.

I suppose if the alignment of the parts is just right it would only take a .001 inch change to enable the safety to rotate - and that suggests that the pushing the bolt forward to rotate the safety will work only on a few guns.

Regards,
Bill
 

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You're right Bill. For some reason I was thinking there's a notch for the safety but its the face of the cylinder. I think you were on the right path as having to push the bolt forward would bother me.
 

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I figure the best way to resolve this sort of issue is to just take a small amount of extra metal off the beveled surface of the safety lever so it is easier for it to 'stick it's nose' in front of the cocking piece.

This way, no critical dimensions get messed with.
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I figure the best way to resolve this sort of issue is to just take a small amount of extra metal off the beveled surface of the safety lever so it is easier for it to 'stick it's nose' in front of the cocking piece.

This way, no critical dimensions get messed with.
Sure, removing a tiny bit of metal from either the cocking piece or the safety will work - if pushing forward on the bolt does not.

In this case it would seem that the cocking piece is too long since it caused the problem in both of the two bolts/guns tried. Or the lug on the bottom of the cocking piece is too short which would also cause the leading edge of the cylinder to be too far forward.

I like your technical term 'stick its nose'. The German technical term is 'sticken die Nosen'. ;)

Regards,
Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OK -- I surrendered to the will of the majority and took a file to my safety. I removed only a slight amount of metal and thought "I don't think that's enough but in the interest of not removing more than necessary, I'll try it". I tried it and it worked. Looking at the modified safety you can't see anything other than what looks like normal wear on the bearing surface. I estimate the amount of metal removed was .5 hair.

I agree that filing the safety is better than filing the cocking piece.

Regards,
Bill
 
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