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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Not trying to start a war here, just getting general opinions. I just picked up a Schmidt Rubin 1889 and am curious as to how it stacks up against the 96/11 and k31. I have owned both of the others and found them to be fine shooters that keep pace with my swedes all day. How does the 1889 shoot compared to its progeny?
 

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OK, not great. The generous neck and throat dimensions, designed for paper-patch bullets of a style not readily duplicated at home, make accuracy a challenge. Expect consistent 5-shot groups of 2.5+MOA on a good day and don't put much faith in reports of one-off smaller groups. "Even a blind squirrel . . ."
 

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Well, finally we had a day without rain today, did a little target shooting up in the mountains. Marked with red Xs 9 rounds with me shooting, red Vs my wife's 4 shots. There are 7 shots in that circled cluster with two fliers, one called and one not. Shots marked with little circles are from my '94 Winchester and unmarked ones are 13 shots fired from '89 SR in rapid succession, about 2 seconds per shot. 150 yards.
 

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Iraqveteran8888 and Military Arms Channel did a video on one. I think they shot it out too 600 yards. They managed to get hits with the help of a spotter. Definitely harder than with the newer K Swiss rifles.
 

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Yeah, I have to really concentrate on those inverted V sights, later series Swiss rifles have better sights, that's for sure. Also I am shooting from pretty flimsy rest. Camping chair and folding tv dinner table from Walmart with my coat rolled up on it. If I were to shoot '89 SR free standing, I'd be lucky to hit that paper at all.
 

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I think Parashooter has the definitive answer. He usually does....

The K31 can put in 1,15 MOA 10 shot groups if regulated correctly with 1970s to 1990s GP11, something a bit worse with WWII ammo(1,2~1,5 MOA), and Zimmerman's book from 1942 says the M1889 has about 1/2 the accuracy of the K31, so something greater than 2,5 MOA is likely correct.

A chap is my club tried to use a very nice M1889 in the obligatory and Feldschiessen, with a forward hand rest and he fell short, while he makes it almost every time with a K31. In looking at the groups with his handloads, there seemed to be a distinct pattern of the groups opening up as he shot, with a number of shots out of call. Might be the massive chamber/throat and fouling patterns.
 

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Groups opening up usually relates to poor fitting of the aluminum collar. Take the action out of the stock, get a can of carb cleaner and blow all the crap out of that sleeve. It's amazing how much gunk and old cosmo/oil is trapped between it and the barrel. After it's cleaned out, move the collar down as much as you can and check for the "smiley face". If it's centered, you are good to go, but more often than not it won't be as warped stocks are pretty common in '89 SR. Check for barrel bands tension, especially the front one, those get swapped from rifle to rifle all the time. Front barrel band is numbered sometimes on the back side, right under the wood line. There are few other things to check as well. These rifles are not as easy to tune as some but it can be done.
 

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Groups opening up usually relates to poor fitting of the aluminum collar. Take the action out of the stock, get a can of carb cleaner and blow all the crap out of that sleeve. It's amazing how much gunk and old cosmo/oil is trapped between it and the barrel. After it's cleaned out, move the collar down as much as you can and check for the "smiley face". If it's centered, you are good to go, but more often than not it won't be as warped stocks are pretty common in '89 SR. Check for barrel bands tension, especially the front one, those get swapped from rifle to rifle all the time. Front barrel band is numbered sometimes on the back side, right under the wood line. There are few other things to check as well. These rifles are not as easy to tune as some but it can be done.
What do you mean by checking for the "smiley face"? Does this apply to the G11 and K11 models?
 
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