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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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:crossfingers:hoping i get lucky and someone can identify this bolt.purchased on a whim yesterday at the show,mainly cuz the front of the bolt is a Mauser design.the boltface accepts 30-06 cartridge perfectly;but this is a very short bolt.total overall length in cocked position as shown is just 5 and 13/16" my only guess is that it would be for a rifle in 250-3000 cal,or something similar. i'd be extremely grateful to be told what i've purchased.thanks,in advance,cheers.
 

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I did....love it......but that was longer ago than my memory can reach!
Striker looked like BSA just not shrouded as I remember.
 

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I agree with both DK Phillips and Fal Grunt, it looks to me like a Savage Model 1920 rifle bolt with the "03 Springfield" cocking piece extension cut off.

As I recall the Model 1920 was made in both .300 Sav. & .250 Sav.

For a photo of a M1920 bolt scroll down to the 5th item in the link attached below.

http://www.collectiblefirearms.com/Militaria.html

I had one years ago that I was going to try to make into a trim little custom .250 Sav. sporter, but the split receiver bridge makes a top mounted scope problematic, and unless changed somehow, the steep angle of the top tang makes for an rather awkward looking stock. It seemed a shame to try to change it into something that it was never meant to be, so I let it go to someone who would appreciate it as it was.
 

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Savage actually offered two similar rifles, serially. The model 1920 and the lesser known/produced later Model 1920/26. Difference were not startling. The ’20 wore a 22” barrel. The ’26 a slightly heavier 24” barrel and heavier stock. The ’26 also wore a Lyman 54 bolt mounted aperture sight. Chamberings were 250-3000 and later 300 Savage. I have several of the 1920 models and a single 1920/26, the latter in 300 Savage. Of the estimated 12K produced, the latter model likely hovering at something less than 20% of total production. Nowadays these seem to be quite rare, still never a particular following and to my knowledge, primarily an interesting ‘also ran’ item yet today. The aside that the likely demand for bolts for such rifles is probably minuscule to none!
Below several mixed 1920 rifle photos, to offer the best graphics concerning the alleged Springfield model striker. I believe the striker in the original post above is correct for the Model 1920. Simply truncated by removal of the original Springfield style ocking piece!
My take
 

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Loved mine Danty powerful on deer accurate European looks...they never made a better looking handeling follow through hunting gun. Ahead of there time during the depression got it!
Was told that savage 99 barrels could be modified very easy to fit these guns by the guy that bought it from me cutting extracter I believe.
Made the mistake took it to a show traded it for a gun and an heavy album of 28 1 oz silver collection type bars!
Heavier than the rifle its self...
Knew where another was tried to get it after my friend passed....non gun family priced it with emotions not common sense.
Cutting off the cocking knob was suppose to increase lock time firing in those days gone by!
><> Daniel
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
hi,iskra. first off,thank you for taking the time to comment. i had suspicions on first sight that the bolt was a Savage. then on Sunday i found pics online to prove correct,and also upon close inspection,evidence of removal of the cocking piece. your aside regarding demand for this item is,i'm sure,spot on. i have a terrible weakness for acquiring lost bolts,and have a couple others in the same category.in my part of the world,these rifles never were common,and its been many years now since i last saw one at a show.considering the production numbers they would have been in the uncommon group just about everywhere,i imagine.my curiosity for the uncommon was also involved in the purchase,at the same show,of a Russian Berdan II long rifle.i've been collecting milsurp rifles for 40 years now and i don't think i'd ever seen one of these previously. the rifle has an excellent bore still,so now the challenge to hand form some brass for new ammo. so thanks to all the comments to identify the bolt.cheers,Brian
 

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The Savege 20 & 20/26 were interesting guns. Principally the fact that they were both well made, innovative and chambering the "new & imroved" 250 Savage round; all positives. it seems to me that the reasons these guns didn't perform better in the market were likely both internal and external. Internally, the balance between diversifying production on one hand and internal competition; literally competing with yourself, on the other. It seems that Savage never really had the Model 1920 commitment. Looking only at serial numbers and sub-models of the 1899. vast numbers produced compared to these bolt models. Then the fact of Remington entering the high power bolt market in 1921 with their refurbished Model 1917. Trermed the Model 30 and capable of chambering a bunch of cartridges (even though not done for half decade). With largely military surplus parts, particularly including bolt and receiver, a huge advantage and potent economic adversary. Then in 1925, coming Winchester with it's relatively svelte Model 54 in multiple chamberings. I believe perhaps the Savage bolts lapsing, more a marketing decision than any external factor. Offering what they made and sold best.
The US "Great Depression", suddenly in October 1929 and by then it would seem, the little 1926 already well on its last legs. During the entire twenties era, the lever gun was still commercial king. Winchester and Remington, the big players, were still outselling their lever and pump/semi auto products, respectively to their bolt models.

Investment, design, quality, marketing, timing, price point, commitment; a century ago and now, all need to click. Interesting to view the panorama! From such as the beautiful and interesting Newton rifles, to market gorilla, Winchester in their 1894/94; the panoramic rise & fall of American gun industry players! Perhaps waxing too nostalgic!

And finally... Well Frosty, enjoying rifle bolts I suppose, harmless. That until a fetish and perhaps seeking bolt centerfolds too! :)
Take care and all here...
Just my take
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
that is a really consummate diagnosis of the 20,30,and 40's decades of American firearms production. would you care to explain how the Winchester company,"king of the heap" could screw up so badly in the following 3 decades?
 
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