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Those are barrel address not patents. Colt maintained sales office at various times in Hartford, New York, & London. The address has nothing to do with the various patents.
Dan
 

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Yes, all the Colt revolvers were made at the factory in Hartford regardless of barrel address. Sam'l Colt had thought to start a factory in London in 1858-59. I think for a short time he did rent space and assemble some before he gave up the idea. Any revolvers sold in England will have British proof marks. I have seen a few 1860 Models and a few 1851 models that had the London barrel address but no proof marks. These were never exported to England and were sold in American.
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for this explanation Dan.
I have another question about a 1860 made pocket Colt revolver I would like to buy.
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#181408
It's number matching but the cylinder marking is strange

No "COLT'S" marking on the patent line and no serial #
I know that some Colt revolver cylinders doesn't wear the serial #, but the absence of the brand leaves me septical
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Francois
 

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I have seen a few Colt Model 1849 Pocket Pistols without a serial number on the cylinder. The two I recall were made about the same time as this one and were factory engraved. I believe the consensus among collectors at the time was that Colt was using up parts made for the failed London project. However I may be mistaken on that. It's been over 40 years since I collected Colts.
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My main concern is not the missing serial number.
Collectorsfirearms has a Colt Model 1849 in this case for sale :
Colt 3” Barrel 1849 Pocket Model (C15462)

But rather the absence of the "Colt" name.
How could W.Ormsby, the official cylinder engraver of Samuel Colt, make (and use) a cylinder etching matrix without the name of Colt on the patent line?
That sounds very strange. :unsure:

Francois
 

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I don't really have an adequate answer to your question. It may be that the roll die was broken or damaged. It is also possible that revolvers without complete marks were sold at a discount through Colt agents overseas.
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A damaged or broken roll die seems improbable. In this case, the cylinder would have been rejected during the control at the Hartford plant.
Or maybe, it has been rejected and instead of the bin, it ended up in a worker’s "lunch box" (this could also explain the lack of a serial number )

Anyway, thank you very much Dan for trying helping me.
I will have to carefully examine this revolver before a possible purchase. ;)

Thanks again
Francois
 

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A damaged or broken roll die seems improbable. In this case, the cylinder would have been rejected during the control at the Hartford plant.
Or maybe, it has been rejected and instead of the bin, it ended up in a worker’s "lunch box" (this could also explain the lack of a serial number )

Anyway, thank you very much Dan for trying helping me.
I will have to carefully examine this revolver before a possible purchase. ;)

Thanks again
Francois
It’s not a damaged roll die, it’s the typical roll mark on a cylinder made in Italy, probably by Uberti or Pietta. They don’t have the Colt name on them for obvious reasons. Someone has replaced the cylinder.
 

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To check for authenticity of early percussion revolvers:

1) Rifling should be progressive. This is the case of ALL major manufacturers (Colt, Remington, Starr, etc.), but NONE of the repros
2) Check the diameter of the nipples. The original threads are 225-32; none of the repros use this (It actually becomes a bit of a pain to find replacement nipples if you have an original)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
@ ibmikey & brightmountain : no possibility to check nipples thread or progressive rifling, the revolver is for sale on internet. I gave up my plan to buy it.

Instead, I purchased a .44 russian Smith & Wesson Nr.3 New Model.
Slightly more expensive, but more authentical for sure. And in any case, I prefer S&Ws. ;)
Thanks for your help, guys

François
 

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Francois
A good decision. I would rather have the S&W .44 single action revolver also. I like the big Smith's.
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I like the big Smith's.
Dan

So do I, Dan.
I already have a Russian contract second model US commercial and a .44 American.
Was just in need of a New Model
Later, when I'll richer, I will seek for a .45 Schofield and the Nr.3 family will be complete. At least for a small collector like me ;)

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All the best
François
 

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This is all I have. The top one , New Model #3 was shipped to Japan and was captured on Guadalcanal. The bottom one is a Loewe made revolver for the Russians. It was captured in the run up to the taking of Berlin. All I have is verbal history passed down from the veterans that brought them back, no paper work.
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Dan
 
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