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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Couldn't have picked a better day for my latest war horse to arrive at the FFL. She's a very early inland: 10,540. Barrel is a 8-42. She seems mostly correct, but not original due to a rebuild stamp on the stock. Let me know what you guys think!




M1 Garand: late '44 Springfield
1903A3: Early '43 Remington
 

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Very nice!
 

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Looks like a nice honest been there and done that carbine. I'd like to own one like it. No complaints about my '43 Inland, but it is a 'double stamp' because the adjustable sight partially obscured the s/n. Curiously it is quite close in s/n to the Batte M1A1
 

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Any day is a good day to pick up another M! Carbine - my favorite battle rifle !!! You found a very nice one - tell us about the find !!
 

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It looks pretty much correct. I can't tell about the mag. cat though. I don't think that carbine was ever though rebuild. I would say the stock is a replacement. It's odd the stock wasn't cut to low-wood most were except the OG ones. That is a very nice looking carbine. Is your triggerhousing doubled beveled? It should be. Also it could be one of the ones not drilled for the hammer spring I think they were used up to about sn. 10,+++. A friend of mine had one about that early I don't remember the sn. But his had a serrated mag. cat. also.
 

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Quite a few early carbine stocks were not cut down when going through a rebuild center early on. Many carbines were just given a quick check and if it seemed to be in good working order the stock was stamped and off it went to be reissued without any working being done to it. This RIA stamp may be able to be removed or at least lessened if a damp cloth is placed over it and a steam iron is used to try and raise the stamp out of the wood. Once done let it air dry a day or two then try it again. Keep trying till the stamp will no long expand upwards. If the fibers of the wood are not broken just bent then it will work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the kind words and info guys! I picked it up from the CMP forums for a decent price, not a steal in my opinion but definitely less than it should have sold for! I was just looking for a nice example with some early parts, so I was beyond please to get this one.


I posted on another forum asking the possibility of it going back to the arsenal and going through inspection with having nothing replaced, but I don't think many believed that would be possible. We will probably never know for sure!


One thing is for sure though. All the metal parts have the exact same uniform finish wear, patina, dirt and grime, etc. now I'm not saying that makes me think the rifle is all original (minus the stock) but it very well could be. I'm no expert though.

The stock is the main puzzler. The RIA stamp covers the crossed the cannons, and it still retains the firing proof on the grip, and the stock remains un modified, so if there was a way to know if a carbine could go through rebuild and not have parts replaced (perhaps early rearsonalment?) then I would put my bet on it POSSIBLY being an all original carbine.



What do you guys think?



M1 Garand: late '44 Springfield
1903A3: Early '43 Remington
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quite a few early carbine stocks were not cut down when going through a rebuild center early on. Many carbines were just given a quick check and if it seemed to be in good working order the stock was stamped and off it went to be reissued without any working being done to it. This RIA stamp may be able to be removed or at least lessened if a damp cloth is placed over it and a steam iron is used to try and raise the stamp out of the wood. Once done let it air dry a day or two then try it again. Keep trying till the stamp will no long expand upwards. If the fibers of the wood are not broken just bent then it will work.


As for the carbine not being touched but going through rearsenal, that would be my bet, but I'm told that's not probable due to the procedure when refurbishing rifles. Who knows.



As for hiding the rebuild stamp.. That's a big no no for me.. I feel like that's basically thievery.. Hiding or removing something as significant as that, because then it would be possible to try and pass it off as all original. Not saying that was your intention at all, just voicing my reasons as to why I wouldn't.


M1 Garand: late '44 Springfield
1903A3: Early '43 Remington
 

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Early on there were no rebuild instructions to cut the high wood down to low wood. The war was still going on and the carbine was needed. It may have had something like a broken spring or a bad extractor and was fixed at RIA and then shipped out again.

Removing the rebuild stamp is not cheating anything. IF it can be removed by steaming then doing so will increase the value. It is the reason you got it cheaper then you thought it should be in the first place. The stock is an early one and quite valuable in it's own right IF the RIA is removed. If you cannot remove it or decide not to remove it then that is fine too as it's yours and you can choose what you want. But now you have to realize that you have two different values. One with the stamp and one without. Some people think of it as part of the history of it and some people feel it's just a standard thing as almost all carbines went through a rebuild of one kind or another and just detracts from the value of the carbine.
 

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Early on there were no rebuild instructions to cut the high wood down to low wood. The war was still going on and the carbine was needed. It may have had something like a broken spring or a bad extractor and was fixed at RIA and then shipped out again.

Removing the rebuild stamp is not cheating anything. IF it can be removed by steaming then doing so will increase the value. It is the reason you got it cheaper then you thought it should be in the first place. The stock is an early one and quite valuable in it's own right IF the RIA is removed. If you cannot remove it or decide not to remove it then that is fine too as it's yours and you can choose what you want. But now you have to realize that you have two different values. One with the stamp and one without. Some people think of it as part of the history of it and some people feel it's just a standard thing as almost all carbines went through a rebuild of one kind or another and just detracts from the value of the carbine.
Tuna:

I do not have the time or patience to properly address your post, so I will simply state that it ranks among the most objectionable and obtuse posts that I have ever read on Gun Boards. Your disregard for history and your selfish focus on personal pleasure is disappointing on a collector's forum but sadly, many collectors of US martial arms would agree with every word you wrote.
 

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Early on there were no rebuild instructions to cut the high wood down to low wood. The war was still going on and the carbine was needed. It may have had something like a broken spring or a bad extractor and was fixed at RIA and then shipped out again.

Removing the rebuild stamp is not cheating anything. IF it can be removed by steaming then doing so will increase the value. It is the reason you got it cheaper then you thought it should be in the first place. The stock is an early one and quite valuable in it's own right IF the RIA is removed. If you cannot remove it or decide not to remove it then that is fine too as it's yours and you can choose what you want. But now you have to realize that you have two different values. One with the stamp and one without. Some people think of it as part of the history of it and some people feel it's just a standard thing as almost all carbines went through a rebuild of one kind or another and just detracts from the value of the carbine.
Removing a rebuild mark to me equates to humping it / making it something it is not. - Usually for profit.

I have a 1942 inland all original unaltered with a 1950s era RIA inspection mark.. much like the OPs, except mine has no rebuild..

I could remove the inspection mark.. but what would that give me? Its been in my family for 50-60 years.. its not only has family history; but its own. It would be a disservice to both to alter it by removing the stamp.
 

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Richard, IF you had read what I had stated you have seen that I said there are two choices that can be made. One will increase the value IF, IF it is possible to remove the stamp and the other is to leave it as is as some feel this is the history of the stock. And no, if one was to remove the stamp it is not cheating if one is on the side of keeping a stock as collectable as possible. They are now very rare to find and if one can be returned to 100% again then that is what one can choose to do. This was NOT AN IMPORT which has been doctored up. BUT it is ones personal choice to make as to what one wants. This comes under the same heading as one repairing a broken stock to return it back into a useable collectable piece.
 

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It amazes me the differences in the collector communities standards for what is OK. So many US collectors "restore'' their weapons, and it is widely but not universally accepted. Even disclosure is not universally expected. Many other specialty collectors demand no alteration and only if a firearm is a mess, they may accept a declared restoration of a very rare item. Every other collecting speciality is all over the board, but the Garand and Carbine collectors are the ones that are the most tolerant of a restored example in my experience. I think I could detect a carbine stock with a removed rebuild mark but because application of BLO, Tung Oil, Linseed oil is so accepted on US rifles, it is more difficult.

M1911 collectors will accept a high quality restoration on an uncommon or rare gun but the cost of the restoration will equal or exceed the cost of the restoration. Additionally, many of us can detect even the best of resotrations.

Restoration has its place IMO, but it should be limited to largely otherwise unavailable examples and weapons which are so far gone that they are otherwise a total loss. I had Dave Lanara restore a SA Colt because it was so bubbified only restoration could restore some dignity to the poor thing. Bubba took a totally matching Calvary model, cut the barrel to about 4 inches, cut the ejector housing, sleeved the cylinder and barrel, replaced the front sight, modifed the hammer for rimfire, what a mess. No way will this on pass for an original but it will pass for what it is, a beautiful restoration.
 

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You have a high wood stock (uncommon) and features of a early WWII carbine.

THe RIA is part of history of stock for whatever reason but its there and its good to go.

Now...is that stock a replacement stock to the barreled action ? Could be.. so what !

IT could be orig stock to the bbl action: could be.

I tell you what it is though, its a nice high wood early war example carbine and just enjoy it.

Remember in the category of collectors: the most anal are carbine collectors . If they can't find
anything wrong with a weapon, they'll invent it ...of course if its their carbine , the damned thing is always "correct".

As you can see, the "Friction" of honest discussion is high emotions and tempers with carbine collectors .
 
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