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Well, it's kinda coming along slwoly as I still await my new collector's license here in my new state. Hopefully soon.

I now have everything to complete the rifle back to 1944 specs, but now comes the stock conundrum. I recently received 2 superb 91/30 stocks sets from my friend Alsky, both WW2 era birch. One has finer inletting, sharp fingergrooves, and no rear band take-off notch in the stock, and the sling slots are bare slots - no escutcheons or simple liner. This is a darker birch stock, akin to what I have seen out of St. Petersburg and even Finland.

The second stock is decidedly gorgeous in figure and colour, being a very nice warm orange, but definately shows the rigours of fast-production - fingergrooves cut with a chisel almost (but with an absolute PLETHORA of cyrillic stampings in the grooves!), and not-so-accurate inletting. ONE sling slot has a liner (the upper), whereas the lower does not (and appears NEVER to have had one). BOTH stocks show remnants of the CCCP cartouche, one bears an O in a circle stamp, and BOTH have a medium sized 2 stamped on the butt tang.

My question is, in 1944, when my Izhevsk sniper was made, did they select stocks of finer inletting for the snipers, or just tried any rifle/stock combo that shot the best?

There is a DISTINCT difference in tolerances between the two stocks, and to my thinking, the darker finer inletted stock is more likely to give the best results. The rifle is currently still in its post-war rebuild laminate stock (did many post-war 91/30 snipers wear laminate stocks as LEGITIMATE sniper stocks?)

And lastly, does anyone have a TEMPLATE or accurate diagramme to show the measurements to make the stock cuts? I will do the job once the rifle is to hand, but wouldn't mind a template or even really clear photos to help here.

MANY thanks to my friend Alsky for ALL the assistance rendered so far in locating all the parts required, and BRG for the post-war genuine base.



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Notching the stock is not hard at all. When I did mine I used an inexpensive razor knife,the kind that has sections of the blade that you can snap off when they get dull, the larger kind works best.
With the mount attached to the reciever,place the action in the stock,the stock will stop the action from going all the way down,the first resistance being the square where the lower elevation screw lives. Use the razor knife to make 2 notches on either side of the square leaving just a bit of clearance.
Now take the action back out of the stock,take a screwdriver and use the handle to tap the edge of the razorknife blade down into the notches making verticle cuts,stop before you think they are long enough.
The razor knife can now be used to cut the horizontal cut between the two verticle cuts you just made. Drag the blade slowly and with moderate pressure along the grain joining the two cuts. go over this line over and over again until the wood splits neatly.
Now put the action back in and see where you need to cut next,take it slow and easy,cut a little and check the fit. Use the same method to get the longer notch needed for the entire mount to fit. Leave about 1/16" gap between the wood and the mount.


You might want to stain the freshly cut wood areas to match the rest of the stock and brush on a little shellac or polyurethane to protect the wood from moisture.
Hope this helps.
Bossman
 

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44 PU Resniper

Hi Vulch, I have a bunch of restored PU snipers, and they have all different types of stocks on them, what ever was put on at last refurb. The only one I have in original condition is my '44 Izhevsk that came in scopeless configuration from Samco. I added post war mount and original 44 era scope. It has the late war sling eschutchons and no band removal notches. It has a oil finish, dont know if this is original or the Yugos did it. Scope mount cut out is neatly done, with a big 1/16in clearance all around. Bolt is crudely bent down, and quite a bit out from vertical when closed. Trigger pull is sweet, light, single stage, not your typical mosin trigger!
 

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I agree with Bossman on inletting the stock for the PU base and using a razor/utility/xacto knife or similar. Not difficult and can be done very cleanly if you go at a careful pace and fit it frequently.
One word of caution. Do not try for too tight a fit of wood to metal. In particular at the rear of the base. Upon recoil the action can move in the stock and can shear off the small area of wood just to the rear of the base. Don't aske me how I found out. Easy fix but frustrating and at the range you end up searching for a 1/2 inch by 2 inch slice of stock that flew off the rifle.
 
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