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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Does anybody recognize this? 15 pak boxes are unmarked. Bullet looks nickel jacketed. Case heads are unmarked as well.

Primers looked like paper from a distance, just funny corrosion I guess. And they are staked in, hopefully visible in the picture.

Thanks for any help. I have six or seven full boxes of twenty, and about 10 boxes of empty but still primed cases.

Jeff
 

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They do look like 8mm Mauser! But remember that "looks like" and "is" has a lot of room for error! You want to be certain! My advise is to get a good caliper and do some measuring of critical things like bullet diameter just past the case mouth and overall length of the case without bullet and also length of a complete cartridge. Also compare your mystery cartridge to known examples of similar cartridges.
 

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Looks like post-war 8mm Mauser Czech export ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If Czech, is it safe to fire, corrosive primer? Half of what I have has been pulled apart, primed empty cases. Primers have four small stakes. They are not berdan. Do you think this is reloadable?

Thanks,
Jeff
 

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They are Berdan...Roth Patent (single central small flashhole thru anvil). Theoretically "Reloadable" if you are a Berdanner...The Zinc Primers are ZdH30/40 German/Czech wartime production, also probably NON-Corrosive (Early composition).

Packed soon after WW II using up old stock of Wartime components.

Doc AV
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
They are Berdan...Roth Patent (single central small flashhole thru anvil). Theoretically "Reloadable" if you are a Berdanner...The Zinc Primers are ZdH30/40 German/Czech wartime production, also probably NON-Corrosive (Early composition).

Packed soon after WW II using up old stock of Wartime components.

Doc AV
Fascinating, Doc. Thank you!

I carefully measured and they are indeed 8x57 Mauser.

Jeff
 

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What DocAV said is true. I got an education on them when someone showed a picture of one at another site. So not all Berdan cases can be identified by offset flash hole/s. According to some sites the old primer can be removed with a fine pin, but I wonder how long the pins would last without breaking. This would be great if true and you had a lot of once fire cases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
More info

So here is a case of this 8mm that I took an end mill to after firing the primer. As you can see, there is only one flash hole, but it is offset. Seeing only one hole from the top made me believe it was not Berdan, but indeed it is. I have milled the anvil away in the hopes of converting to boxer but no-go with that offset flash hole and the groove below the anvil is deeper than a boxer primer.

The only question remaining is does any of this confirm the consensus that it is of Czech origin, and does anyone know with reasonable certainty if it is corrosive or non-corrosive as DocAv suggests?

Thanks for your help.

Jeff
 

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So here is a case of this 8mm that I took an end mill to after firing the primer. As you can see, there is only one flash hole, but it is offset. Seeing only one hole from the top made me believe it was not Berdan, but indeed it is. I have milled the anvil away in the hopes of converting to boxer but no-go with that offset flash hole and the groove below the anvil is deeper than a boxer primer.

The only question remaining is does any of this confirm the consensus that it is of Czech origin, and does anyone know with reasonable certainty if it is corrosive or non-corrosive as DocAv suggests?

Thanks for your help.

Jeff
The best way to determine if unknown ammo is corrosive or noncorrosive, is to test it. Take a sample cartridge, pull the bullet, dump the powder and then chamber and fire the empty primed case at a piece of polished steel from a distance of a foot or two. Wait a few days. If the steel rusts -- it is corrosive. If not, it is likely noncorrosive. Be sure to clean the gun as you would for corrosive ammo. Some powders are mildly corrosive. To test the powder, take a TINY sample, enough to fill a regular .22 rim fire case and pour it on a piece of polished steel. Use a long (6 - 8 inches or more) kitchen match to ignite it. Wait a few days. If the polished steel rusts, the powder is corrosive. Be safety conscience when preforming these tests and take all prudent precautions.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks, Shooterike. Seems simple enough. I wouldn't have figured I'd see results in just days, but I'm going to give it a try. I have several boxes already pulled to test the primers with. I have already decided NOT to reuse the powder or fire any of the original loads in my K98. I'm going to take the advice of another poster on my thread about reusing this powder in reduced load, by using it as fertilizer.

Thanks again,
Jeff
 
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