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I recently bought 1400 rounds of 1951 Turk 8mm ammo but havent shot any yet. I have the opportunity to buy more at .18 a round but different years (1942 and 1943). Can anyone tell me anything about 1951, 1942 and 1943 Turk 8mm? Quality, accuracy, etc? I would also like to know about Greek 8mm if you can.

Thank you to all my fellow shooters for the assistance.
 

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Turk 8mm is ok ammo id say.On the dirty side,dirty is putting it lightly. The turk rds ive had were pretty good when it came to accuracy. Ive had some that put a muzzle flash out over a footlong from the muzzle. The little bit of 8mm greek that I got my hands on seemed a little more consistent and a little more clean than the turk. The pain rating was about the same. Greek seems to have dried up and blown away.
 

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Turk ammo 101.

Within the context of the years you asked about.
BTW 47 was the "stinko" year. Loose bullets etc.

We have not tried the 1951 Turk, so this is refering to early forties stuff.

For .18 cents per round it is a good buy nowdays. It used to be a nickel per round.

Each Mauser is different and you have to check it out and find the right combination of rifle and Milsurp ammo.

Greek 8mm is a mixed bag and it comes in different years of mfgr.

Some Greek shoots pretty good, most does not. Depends on the year and lot you have. So there is no way to tell.

You will get the comments that it shoots great, but that doesn't mean much. Since every batch was different. No consistancy at all.
Same with the Yugo from the early fifties. Some is very accurate and no FTF, others have recessed primers and lots of FTF depending on your rifle and the FP spring used. In gen. it is a little hotter than the newer seventies. Accuracy goes from stellar to VG. Most of it is more than adequate in accuracy for most shooters.

It is impt. to know the Turk you asked about is LB about 150 grain give or take. It is loaded hot. Chronos in the 2900 to 3300 range. As compared to Yugo 8mm which chronos in the 2500 range.

It has a hefty recoil and may cause your Mauser to have a "sticky" bolt. Emphasis on "MAY".

The bullet is cupro nickel and primers are corrosive. Cupro nickel bullets are hard on the bore, but should not affect the average shooter. Needs GOOD cleaning after shooting. The corrosive salts will be under the cupro nickel deposits in the barrel, so good cleaning is a must.

How dirty a Milsurp ammo shoots is not all that impt. You have to clean the bore well anyway because of the cupro nickel and corrosive primers, so all 8mm milsurp ammo will require a GOOD cleaning after shooting. Just that some require a little more cleaning than others.

At one hundred yards it Turk LB will shoot about 7 to 12" lower than Yugo HB.

You will need to adjust your shooting to that fact.

Light bullets will have a Lower POI. In gen. short barrelled Mauser do not do well with LB 8mm.

It is in gen. consistant and accurate enough for silouhette shooting at short and long range.

It is NOT consistant enough or accurate enough for paper target shooting. Yugo seventies or newer and some of the fifties Yugo HB is much better for that.

In gen. the shorter barreled Mausers like HB better and the longer barreled rifles have to be tested to see which type they like better.

In Gen. for accuracy.

A well tuned Mauser sniper should shoot all touching five shot groups at 100yds.
Yugo seventies or newer will do it.
Yugo from the early fifties, most will do it.

Turk will not. Groups open up to a few inches. Still good plinking stuff.

Romanian LB will not. We have never found a Mauser that will shoot Romanian consistant or well enough for paper target shooting. Good stuff for plinking and silhouettes. Is sooty and usually cycles well, even with a the steel cases, because it is "puny" loaded.

Greek, some of it will, very "iffy"

Equadorian not even in the ball park

FNM from SAMCO won't do it, but is very close. Lot of inconsistancy in the recent lots from SAMCO.

Hirtenberger from SAMCO is hot and not as accurate as newer Yugo, but very accurate and consistant in gen.

The most accurate and consistant 8mm we have found over the years, is seventies or newer Yugo HB, and German sS HB from the thirties P codes. Hands down.
German P codes is rare.

If anyone ever posts seventies or newer Yugo it sells before the ink dries. No debate, its the most accurate Milsurp 8mm. IN DEMAND

There is info. that a shipment of 8mm sniper ammo is en route.
It will be pricy I'm sure. I can't imagine it being more accurate than the regular newer Yugo.

I won't post precise accuracy info. here. Gets too much controversy.

This is just a rule of thumb type of info.
Every Mauser is different and there are exceptions to the rule.

Forgot to mention the Yugo steel cased 8mm from 80 and 81.
This ammo is inconsistant and has stellar accuracy with flyers. When it does shoot well it is as accurate as any 8mm we ever shot.
It causes "sticky" bolts in a lot of Yugo mausers.
We tried about three or four cases of it and will not use it anylonger unless it is the last resort.
 

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It looks like 666 told you every thing you need to know. Right on 666 You couldent have said it better.
 

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Yeah, no SH#*.
Jeez, Ive looked all over the net for what the gentleman summarized for me in a long paragraph. Many thanks 666. Good to know that we have a site like this and people with the kind of knowledge you have. Im glad you took the time out to share it. Its very nice of you and the info is greatly appreciated.
 

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Your welcome. Too windy to go shooting, lots of extra time.

Also just for info. 8mm Milsurp more precise information.

The Yugo 196 grain 8mm ammo used different powders, some is better than others and the type is printed on the cardboard box. This is impt. info. for those pulling the bullets and using the original powder in new brass and primers. Which is quite popular, since the recessed primers can have lots of FTF in fifties Yugo. Even changing the FP spring to a 26lbs, in some long rifles doesn't guarantee no FTFs.

Turk ammo has powder variations over the years. So one bandolier may have a slight shift of POI over another batch. Storage cond. also are a factor.
Turk ammo does not have a hist. of FTF. Most of it is pretty reliable.

Earlier Turk in the blue bandoliers is HB and has six pocket bandoliers is exc. ammo, 196 grain as opposed to 150 grain for the early forties stuff in green bandoliers.

There is also Turk from earlier and later years that performs a little different than the early forties stuff. Lots of variety in Turk ammo.

Lets hope the Bannana boat comes in soon with Millions of rounds of 8mm, so the prices will go down a bit.

Turk ammo at the last gunshow was around $20 per 70 rnd. bandolier. Century used to have it for just a little over $2 per bandolier years ago.
 

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I got one for you 666. What is the rubber stampet number on the out side of a lot of the 1950s yugo 8mm?
 

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One of our gun club members is from the old country and used to work in the arms and munitions field.
He interpeted the different powder names for us, as well as the rest of the confusing writting on the labels.

IIRC the blue type stamping were mentioned once to be factory lot numbers or which crew put them together (packaged them).

Not sure, but I can ask next time I see him.

The former communist satelite countries sometimes included a slip with the packers name and date.
 

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I recently bought 1400 rounds of 1951 Turk 8mm ammo but havent shot any yet. I have the opportunity to buy more at .18 a round but different years (1942 and 1943). Can anyone tell me anything about 1951, 1942 and 1943 Turk 8mm? Quality, accuracy, etc? I would also like to know about Greek 8mm if you can.

Thank you to all my fellow shooters for the assistance.
Can you email me I have a question about your ammo results.
 

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Also, I have found the 1940s will attract a magnet. The 1950s is copper jacketed and won't. That can be important at some ranges.
 
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