Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,955 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently restored a 7.35 cav carbine that was a semi sportereized. I shot it and its a neat little rifle. Just how many of these were made. I probably went to deep out of pocket on this project but you just don't see them around much and I like it so what the heck I did it.
 

·
Platinum Bullet member
Joined
·
10,201 Posts
I've seen the number 100,000 mentioned but have no proof. You don't see them very often. SW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
These carbines are by no means rare, but seem to be very unevenly distributed. Few made their way into the USA, and most seem to have hit the collectors' market in Germany and Italy.

(Edited in 2009 : ) Riepe even asserts on p. 212: "Die Moschetti d.c. im Kaliber 7,35 sind relativ häufig zu finden."
(The cavalry carbines in caliber 7.35 are rather frequently encountered.)

They are however often regarded as a bit more desirable than either the normal Fucile M 1938 or the M 91/38 cavaly carbine in 6,5mm, which is not wrong. "Rare" in the stricter sense, however, is only the Moschetto TS 38.

Carcano
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
950 Posts
Beretta and Brescia seem to have made about 10,000 each of the Cavalry Carbines. Gardone was around 20,000-40,000 I think. Terni made the most by far, but the number escapes me right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
1.
Interesting new detail: Terni started its production of M 38 cavalry carbines already in 1937 (!!), not in 1938.
Proof: my own gun which I just acquired. It has the fixed M 38 rear sight, the post-1936 round barrel base, the date 1937 XV, and the serial number A 1233.

2.
Serial number ranges in Riepe's big book are too sparse and incomplete. Here a few additional data of mine:

Beretta Gardone

F 2632 1938-XVI
F 7301 1939-XVI
F 8481 1939-XVII
F 8621 1939-XVI(I)

F.N.A. Brescia

H 7138 38-XVI
H 7339 38-XVII
I 5841 38

Gardone V.T.

A 2409 939-XVII
A 4271 939-XVII
A 4596 939-XVII
B 1290 939-XVII
C 4984 939-XVII
C 8713 939-XVII
D 6576 939-XVII
D 7253 939-XVII
D 8702 939-XVII
E 751 939-XVI (imprecisely stamped?)
E 1149 939-XVII
E 5846 939-XVII
E 6232 939-XVII
E 7190 939-XVII
E 7201 939-XVII
E 7291 939-XVII
F 3158 939-XVII
F 7710 939-XVII
G 1226 939-XVI (badly stamped?)

Terni

A 1233 1937 XV
A 2408 1938 XVI
A 6240 1938 XVI
A 9822 1938 XVI
B 2580 1938
B 2692 1938 XVII
B 34xx 1938
C 717 1939
E 9958 1939 XVII
P 4764 1939 XVII
P 6929 1939 XVII
R 4624 1939 XVIII (?)

More detailed reports would be *very* welcome - our readers should feel invited to contribute :).
Please also describe, if you will be so kind, the stock markings and the additional markings on the barrel base (esp. any traces of older reworked and rebored barrels).

Thanks, Carcano
 

·
Platinum Bullet member
Joined
·
10,201 Posts
Mine is a Beretta Gardone #F8862. The Roman Numeral of the E.F. date is hard to read - crowded XV(obscured I)I.

Very small crown over 'RE' below the serial number. Stock shows a crown over *** '39 cartouche. Matching stock serial number struck very close to the butt plate. On the opposite side is a round Beretta cartouche with '1939'.

Bottom flat of the bayonet has a rampant lion mark.

Another unusual feature - ( to me) the stock is walnut. Perhaps Beretta had a supply reserved until the Fascists learned of it? SW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Production data of the Mod. 38 Cav carbine cal. 7.35 are provided by Di Giorgio and Pettinelli in their book, estimated from the low and high serial number documented in their database of several thousand Carcanos (all models).

Beretta: 60000 (A-G series)
FNA: 9000 (H series)
Gardone: 74000 (A-H series)
Terni: 72000 (A-D and P-S series). They report A1099 1938 as the first one from Terni in their dataset, therefore Carcano's A1233 dated 1937 seems an outlier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
Many thanks for the most welcome addition, DMala! This book is indeed one I must acquire as soon as feasible (he wrote, visibly ashamed... ;-).

As to barrels, it is my understanding they were pre-produced in larger, already dated and manufacturer-marked batches, "in stock and barrel", so to pun, and only later (could even be up to a year later) assembled into rifles and then (only then) serialized, as many not quite matching examples of date vs. serial number show us (notably with M 91/41 rifles). This could explain the phenomenon of this unusually early date for a M 38 type carbine. The 7,35x51 mm cartridge, after all, was developed by Roberto Boragine before the M 38 family of guns.

Carcano
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Many thanks for the most welcome addition, DMala! This book is indeed one I must acquire as soon as feasible (he wrote, visibly ashamed... ;-).

As to barrels, it is my understanding they were pre-produced in larger, already dated and manufacturer-marked batches, "in stock and barrel", so to pun, and only later (could even be up to a year later) assembled into rifles and then (only then) serialized, as many not quite matching examples of date vs. serial number show us (notably with M 91/41 rifles). This could explain the phenomenon of this unusually early date for a M 38 type carbine. The 7,35x51 mm cartridge, after all, was developed by Roberto Boragine before the M 38 family of guns.

Carcano
Hello Carcano,
Are you looking for Carbine information only, 7.35mm information only or Carbines in 7.35mm only? Dan P.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top