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5 reasons NOT to tell her to buy a revolver as her first gunhttp://www.gunnuts.net/2014/06/26/5-reasons-not-to-tell-her-to-buy-a-revolver-as-her-first-gun/

I don’t know where it came from, but for some reason women new to handguns, and especially interested in concealed carry, are always told to buy revolvers. Sometimes, women should buy a revolver. For example, if they like it, are proficient shooting with it, and have found it easy to conceal. It shouldn’t be everyone’s automatic go-to though, and here are a few reasons why: ...

*Where does this thinking come from that females should be relegated to revolvers? Seems this kind of thinking always pops up...
Ok, trying to teach some females how to drive a stick shift may be an exercise in futility but ... a female can't drive a semi-auto? Seriously?
If anything, try before buy is the best advice one can give. Far too many people buy a gun for looks, size, caliber, capacity, because someone recommended it, etc. without ever trying it out only to discover, quite a few bucks later, that they don't really like it.
Give her a wide variety of guns to pick from in multiple range sessions and find what fits and suits her best. Do throw some revolvers in the mix.
Some people have a natural preference for a wheelgun. They may find it suits them better and they shoot better with it. Don't exclude one from the list of candidates but do try to keep the game on a fair playing field by equaling power and weight with a comparable semi-auto. She may find the mild recoil of a .38 snubby preferable to a full frame .45 1911 or be totally put off by the blast of a .500 magnum.

Trouble racking a slide? Yeah, can be a problem. Once again, different guns and different techniques.
My wife, despite continuing 40 years of body building and competition, just can't manage racking the slide on my various semi-autos despite every trick in the book.
Her home defense gun is a Taurus Judge Public Defender. Although she cringes at the OMG blast from the thing, she can shoot and reload it effectively. It did require a bit of a trigger job to reduce the awful trigger pull to something that suits her but she is quite confident and capable with it and knows all she has to do is point and pull the trigger.
 

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Your points make sense. Actual handling and shooting of the hardware - a variety of hardware - is the way to go. Plus, if the gun scares her she'll never be any good with it.
 

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The best place to start, in my opinion, is everywhere. They should go to a range where handguns are rented and try everything they can get their hands on. From there, let the woman, or man, decide what feels best to them and what they want to buy. I do suggest a .22 to start if they are agreeable, it costs less to learn on, but they can still find out if they prefer a revolver, or a pistol and if a pistol, striker, DA, DA/SA, SA so it really cuts down on choices when actually laying down hard earned cash.


My wife liked a revolver, and in fact wanted to start with a .357 magnum, MY .357 magnum to be precise. Putting me on the path to finding a new handgun for myself. She has over the years since tried various pistols I bought with her in mind, but really never has grown overly fond of them, oh she can shoot them, and has a P3At for her purse, but she still prefers a revolver which is why she wanted the polymer revolver for lightweight carry last year.
 

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Revolver double-action triggers are heavy and require much practice and dedication to master. Folks--any person, not a woman per se--with not much finger strength or hand strength or arthritis or some other hand and finger issues would be better served with a self-loading pistol than with a revolver. Anyone--again, male or female--who is averse to recoil would find the self-loader easier to use and less physically demanding than a revolver, although the ability to change grips on a revolver vs. most semi-auto pistols is a real important feature.

In my admittedly limited experience, if gun-people are recommending carry guns to non-gun people--women included--if it is not a revolver with its very simple and intuitive manual of arms and the ability to "see if its loaded" simpler than with a semi-auto sans loaded chamber indicator, then it is a blow-back operated, small semi-auto pistol, typically in the .380 range. The problem with blow-back semi-auto pistols is that the springs are fairly tough, and the slides tend to be pretty small. This convinces novices with weak hand strength that they cannot manipulate a slide. A semi-auto with a Browning-style locked breech has a slide that literally anyone can be trained to operate using body mechanics and proper technique. Thus, a semi-auto in a larger caliber like 9mm or even .40 may be the way to go rather than, say, a .380. One of the recipes for the Ruger LCPs sales success is that while a .380, it uses a locked breech so that the tiny slide can be manipulated.

Personally, I like revolvers. You might feel different. My wife likes revolvers, but her carry guns are semi-autos. Basically, people need to avoid dogmatic, inflexible thinking when it comes to handgun selection. "Serious" self defense calibers might start at 9x19mm and go up, but the .380 just might be a better handgun for some people provided they know, understand, and work with its limitations. All defensive handgun choices have serious limitations after all.

I will say that I'd eschew any semi-auto with a safety catch or a DA/SA trigger pull. If I had a gun factory and lots of capital backing it, I'd market a 9x18mm Makarov caliber single-stack semi-auto pistol with a DAO trigger, a big front sight, and a tipping barrel like the Beretta 86.
 

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Ammosgt wrote: "
here is the website you want to read and book you want if you are going to be working with a woman on getting her first firearm, or moving into concealed carry
http://www.corneredcat.com/ http://www.amazon.com/Cornered-Cat-W...4026571&sr=8-1
It is written for women by women .. so a little insight for you guys."​


My good ale-wife bought a copy just to support the site! It is a very good primer and introduction written specifically for women.
 

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Shooting is like anything else, you need practice to become proficient. If your wife trains and has fired different weapons on a regular basis, great. For those wives who rarely even pick up a gun, and there are many out here, a revolver is a great companion.
 

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I keep buying my spouse .380's and little revolvers , Latest is Taurus 327 Mag ported 3" barrel and crimson trace grips .. she keeps stealing my 1911's .. we are going to have to get separate safes. Sometimes you have to be a little bit sexist.. if I wasn't sexist just a little bit she would have my Kimber Ultra Carry II already. I don't know how long the "But Honey you won't like it, it is very light for a 45, so there is a lot of perceived recoil.. " is going to work... plan "B" is it is a pain to field strip to clean.. she doesn't like that in a pistol. She already has one of my Maks and two 380's and the Taurus.. Some Fool on some TV show about self defense said if you carry a 380 , then you need to carry two of them.. so she does.. or a 380 and a Mak or the Taurus and a .380 " But dear, the 380 isn't much good if the bad guy is behind cover .. so I need to carry the 327 too... "

And no, 45acp revolvers are not weird .. I have a 1917 on my wish list too. There is just something about moon clips that does it for me.
 

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I advocate carrying your firearm on your person, in a quality holster, whether you are male or female. Carrying in a purse is useless if your first indication that you are being attacked is when your purse is ripped out of your hands or off your shoulder. However, many women still prefer to carry their pistol in their purse and there are purses designed for concealed carry with a separate pocket for the pistol and a steel cable running through the strap to prevent it being cut. A revolver (especially if shrouded or hammer-less) can be fired right through the purse without having to take it out and can even be fired multiple times right through the purse without having to take it out. Semi-auto pistols, not so much.

db, your wife might like a Beretta 86 if you can find one.
 

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I tried so hard to talk my wife into buying herself a Beretta 86 when we found one at a show. She is highly averse to spending money, particularly on additional firearms "we don't need."

Decades ago, at an urban newsstand job on "skid row" I discovered pocket carry of an Airweight J-frame .38 5-shot shrouded hammer revolver and that continued to be my preferred carry method and carry gun through many Carolina and Texas "Springs" and "Second Summers."

These days, I often carry a bobbed hammer .38+P Ruger Speed Six or a .327 [.312"] fed. mag. Ruger 3-in. with a bobbed hammer. If I am accompanying my better half, I'll carry her Ruger LCR since I know she can reliably pull the trigger and is familiar with it, preferring it to my Smith J-frame, or, if she is not taking it with her, her Smith M&P 9mm Shield (which both of us find to be an excellent carry gun). It is hard to argue with the ease of shooting and other advantages of the M&P Shield vs. the all-steel revolvers... Still, I have my revolvers.

As far as off-body carry goes, dedicated gun purses are often the way to go given very many wardrobe considerations specific to women. I keep recommending outfits that I'd think would be just great for on-body carry, but my wife decidedly does not approve of my fashion "sense" if such is what it may be called...

For me, one of the issues with concealed carry is the prospect of contact distance, which is one reason I tend to favor revolvers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When asked for recommendations on guns, I always ask "What do you want the gun for?" Quite often, that results in a pause to think about it and consider or a blank stare.
Do you want a target gun to plink and practice on the range?
Do you want home defense gun?
Do you want a CCW gun?
Do you want to hunt with it?
Do you want one comfortable to carry?
Do you like revolvers or semi-autos?

Surprisingly, many have never thought about or answered those questions. Without trying out different guns, to fit a specific purpose, they go out and buy something on a whim only to find out they don't like it, can't master it, can't shoot well with it so it ends up in a safe or the nightstand drawer. Being put off by the experience, and sting in the wallet, they give up and never bother continuing the search for the right gun for them.

It's a tool! You don't use a hammer to drive a screw so first, determine the job and the purpose then find the right tool for the job.
 

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Not to launch into a political argument, but the 2nd Amendment does read: "A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed." So while pro-2nd R2KBA folks emphasize the "right of the people to keep and bar arms shall not be infringed." there is the part about "well-regulated militia" no? I view it as keep a shootin' iron in one's home, vehicle, etc. but if porting concealed weapons about one's person, then there is the need to demonstrate a certain minimum standard of proficiency with it. Then again, maybe more states should be like Vermont, Alaska, and now, AZ.

I *think* that the SA or Revolver rating on the Texas CHL has finally been done away with. Certainly I "borrowed" a self-loading pistol for my first Texas CHL.

As for the concealed hammer Smith, I always thought that the vast majority of practice, almost exclusive in fact, should properly be double-action. I did consider there might be the one off issue where having the ability for a single-action might be necessary. "The thinking man's carry revolver" if you will. Heh. I have actually allowed lots of pocket lint to gather in the groove behind the hammer and fired it at the range with no problem. It does take swabbing out with a Q-tip every other day or so, however.

We've got quite a few different "scabbards" for pistols and revolvers, that is for sure. We've all got different preferences on "how to carry" the battery of defensive guns, I guess!
 

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Like most here I went through something similar with my wife as well. She started out shooting Makarov, Glock 9mm, 1895 revolvers(just for fun). Fun to shoot at the range, however all were too big to carry. Never mind racking the Mak and big Glock. Very difficult no matter what technique. When she got her CC we picked up a Ruger LCP .380 for purse carry. Easy to hide and conceal. However the slide function is almost as bad as the larger pistols. And its a horrible shooting pistol for a novice learning how to shoot. 2 mags worth and your hand hurts bad enough that you won't want to shoot it again. So practice is out of the questions for her with it. I could shoot it pretty good, however the LCP was definitely the worst shooter by a lot for her or anyone else who tried it as well for that matter. Out of the Glock, Bulgarian Makarov and 1895. No trouble shooting the 3, but the LCP anything past 10'-15' it's all over the place. Never mind in a deadly situation with a moving target.
And then we found the S&W Bodyguard in .380. EASY to rack for anyone. It's so much better than the LCP that you'd think the LCP was ancient. Sold the LCP. She loves the S&W Bodyguard. Won't leave home without it. Plus I am a huge fan of it now as well. Next we tried the S&W Shield in 9mm. Wife had no problem with racking the slide on the Shield either. S&W did a great job making these pistols "user friendly". Plus take down is a breeze. No problem for her either taking it apart. Both the Shield and Bodyguard are the same in regards to maintenance and function. They are the best for CC for anyone choosing a small caliber pistol that's tiny, accurate and is reliable. The Bodyguard is nothing weight wise. The Shield is supper light even loaded. I still carry a Bulgarian Mak mostly. However I'm going with the Shield more and more in the summer months. Actually I'm thinking of doing a comparison of the Shield, BG and Mak the next time I go out shooting with the Mrs. at the end of July.

You should be able to get either for well under $400. I paid $350 or less for each NIB.
 

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I will say, in answer to the original thread post, that one should not "buy the other half" girlfriend, boyfriend, wife, partner, significant other, companion, what-have-you, a gun that the person in question has not explicitly expressed an interest in! My wife loves Colt revolvers. So I ghought I'd treat her to a Colt Trooper Mk. III. Way, way too big. She could not reach the trigger with her tiny hands. It got traded away rather than remain "in inventory." It is almost always a good idea to take a prospective new firearm purchaser to a range that offers rentals and actually try them out, even if one cannot draw from a holster in such settings.
 

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Might work.. I have had real good success with the 123 grain commercial AK type soft points out of my No. 5's .. can't take full loads and that narrow little hard rubber buttplate on these old bones and enjoy it.. download 123 grainers and it is a sweet rifle for old ladies and grandkids, and can still take deer at local hunting ranges of <100 yards.
 

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Wife likes my TT-33 Vietnam Bring-back, though i have some concerns about it as a daily carry gun. Still - she shoots it well. But does have some problems racking slide.

Recently got her a Colt Police Positive 38 Special she liked in the fun shop. She hasn't shot it a lot yet, but some. Works well for her and goes in her carry-purse well without being apparent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Do encourage checking women's gun groups where there is much discussion on carry for females. There are a whole lot of new products for CCW for females, designed by females.
Purse carry has always been a much debated subject as there are many drawbacks to a purse, #1 being it is the target of a mugging!
You also want to resolve some of the other issues, like leaving it locked in the car rather than keeping it on the body. A lot of women want to have access to a gun for personal protection but get a little queasy about actually wearing one on their bodies. There can be some definite wardrobe issues that we men don't have to contend with but as the numbers of female gun owners swells rapidly, many of these issues are being overcome with custom apparel and holsters just for her!
Just as important as what gun she chooses is the manner in which she carries it! Responsible CCW means instant access and quick draw. Be sure she finds a combination that works for her ...
even if you get sucked deep into a whole new wardrobe. And, just like that closet full of shoes, you may ending up spending for a whole shelf of holsters!
 

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Trouble racking a slide? Yeah, can be a problem. Once again, different guns and different techniques.
My wife, despite continuing 40 years of body building and competition, just can't manage racking the slide on my various semi-autos despite every trick in the book.
Her home defense gun is a Taurus Judge Public Defender. Although she cringes at the OMG blast from the thing, she can shoot and reload it effectively. It did require a bit of a trigger job to reduce the awful trigger pull to something that suits her but she is quite confident and capable with it and knows all she has to do is point and pull the trigger.
And I CRINGE.... esp. as I find no use for that gun, as for what everybody else has said
there are 3 keys to a carry gun
can you shoot it (well and accurately)
WILL you shoot it (well and accurately) - now on this one, I differ, because I put stress fire and flinch here, and guns like the KT-P40 which I CAN shoot well, in slow fire etc. but can't do doubles without a FTF/FTE

and the MOST important one,
WILL YOU CARRY IT (everyday, all day)

Surprising for some to many, my EDC is a KT P32
I have 3 little boys, I'm picking up, putting down etc...
I'm hang out with a bunch of moms at playgrounds
climbing in playland tubes to find out why one of them is bawling....

I'm not expecting trouble, I want a reliable pistol, that can fit conveniently and covertly, most important, SECURELY on me.
I don't expect a run-n-gun, I honestly expect a last stand, be being between danger and my kids, .32 works fine at social distances.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Note the considerable differences in a "home defense" gun vs a carry gun. There are a lot of guns well suited to "home defense" that can live in a nightstand, pop open gun safe, etc.,etc. that are not in the least suitable for CCW.
"Home defense" is a gun that can be accessed quickly, in a state of sleep induced confusion in the middle of the night, employed effectively at close quarter distances found indoors, and most likely to lay down an opponent with as few shots as possible. For many reasons I have posted before, the Judge is an ideal "home defense" weapon purpose made for that task.

CCW, and a gun you CARRY ON YOUR PERSON every day, is an entirely different criteria where pro and con of the gun must be weighed and matched to the individual carrying it.
The debate here is why so many people recommend a revolver for a female as a matter of course when there may be many other guns that suit her purpose, wardrobe and carry style.
Finding the one that fits her and her needs is a much more demanding task!
 
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