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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hit a small gun show this weekend, plenty of over price reloading supplies along with open cans powder for sale.
I did find one table with a good selection of C&R military firearms, wound up with a decent condition 38 S&W victory model with everything correctly matching and a good bore but a light government property stamping.​

On the back strap was some letters stamped which I am guessing was some security guard company markings. Looks to be, HE-M anyone got an S.W.A.G. on what it stands for. If it was a squadron or ship number I would assume it to have been fake. This probably just a war time plant guard revolver.

lastditch
 

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unless you can find what that means, on the largest info platform in human history; the internet, then filter the "one grain of truth from all the chaff" that is out there, it's "lost to history" as to what it means or stands for............my wild a$$ guess; it's probably from some unknown defense plant....that seems more likely then not, VICTORY .38 S&Ws were given to defense plants and key installation sites ie. power plants, water treatment facilities etc... in the US, besides being a "loan and lease" to Britain and others
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It is US property marked on top strap P proof and GHD inspection proof, it has no S stamp for hammer block upgrade.

With all correct matching numbers and no S mark upgrade, it might have been put in a lunch box after the war when it was no longer needed.

Were these taken back by the government after the war?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
All good ideas, I already have a small police collection already, so could add to that.

Keep getting told by the wife to “don’t die and leave with all that crap”, she thinks I should quit buying. She says the funniest things.

For right now it will get put in with my multi nation display. Thanks to all for great information and ideas of how to spend money.

lastditch
 

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Keep getting told by the wife to “don’t die and leave with all that crap”, she thinks I should quit buying. She says the funniest things.

lastditch
My wife says the same thing. I keep two sets of books one for my personal weapons and another for my C&R as required by the feds. I always list my cost and the cost of any additions so she knows what they cost, yes the actual cost😆, that way she has all the information In one place If I kick the bucket.

I‘m lucky in that she is licensed and enjoys shooting. She bought me 2 of the last 3 firearms I have as gifts. I’m a lucky man.

Bob
 

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The photos of the stampings on the backstrap appear to have parkerizing over them indicating originally inscribed before finishing or the weapon has been subjected To a refinish. If inscribed during production just what do they mean?
 

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The photos of the stampings on the backstrap appear to have parkerizing over them indicating originally inscribed before finishing or the weapon has been subjected To a refinish. If inscribed during production just what do they mean?
The link in post #7 above tells what the markings are.
The post also has fun with the gun name.
The HE-M is the mark of Hessen, Germany, as authorized by the Allied Control Council in Nov. 1945 for Allied weapons furnish to civilian Police units. 4590 revolvers and 2548 M1 Carbines. There is no direct correlation of serial numbers and these markings. The jury is still out on the "W" stamp, however detailed research by serious students of the Victory has uncovered evidence the the W may be the mark of the War Shipping Administration, established by Executive Order of the President on 2/7/42. The W mark is seen on many Victory Models originally issued to the US Maritime Commission guns, and on a large number of OSS guns that were obtained by the OSS through the Maritime Commission. The OSS guns were returned to the Army after WW2 and some were then issued to the civilian Police units in occupied Germany. Of course, there are a few guns with the W stamp that do not fit any of the accepted theories and the mark may have been applied after market. Ed.
So what you're saying Ed, is "it's a Hessen Wesson"?!? Sorry...had to.
1srelluc, They were returned to the Army.
Jmace57, Yes, you just had a Hessen Wessen Lesson !
Ed.
So, originally issued to a sailor aboard a US merchant vessel (or possibly to the OSS via the US Maritime Commission), then returned to the US Army which reissued it to the Police department of Hessen, Germany after the war.

So yes, it was likely re-parkerized at some point after the German Police marking was stamped.
 

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I forgot to mention but these pistols were not parkerized. Early guns, like late 41-early 42, were blue and usually very nicely, most being WB inspector stamped. Later guns got a DuLite blue finish, a dull blue finish that resembles phosphate. To be reparkerized, they would have to be refinished twice.

IMO, these are one of the undervalued pistols of WW2, especially the early guns with nice blue finish.
 
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