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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The headstamp reads,1.58 on top, the initials TH to the left of the rim, S to the right of the rim. On the bottomof the rim is what appears to be 7.62, a greenish sealer around the primer. Bullet is FMJ with tin as it draws a magnet weakly, black sealer around crimp with a brass case, not blackened. Got 40 of these with a bunch of ammo in a garand deal along with some other black tip AP. I,m guessing, made Jan of 1958 with a .308 bullet but I do not know what the letters mean----does anyone know the arsenal or manufacturer???, THS on the rim.
 

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It is French mil-surp ammo. The TH is the maker of the ammo, the S being the metal supplier. Don't recall off-hand the factory names.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is interesting, gives me another direction to look, thanks. I,ll shoot a few in the Springfield A3 to try them out and save the rest for examples. Wonder if the French had our surplus weapons at that time, a little bit of everything in Indochina I suppose.
 

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French M1949

Cartouche a balle Ordinaire cal. 7,62 Mle 1949. French version of the US.30cal M2 Alt cartridge. Made in France up to the 1960s, both Militarily (four position headstamp) and commercially. Made in Brass and Lacquered Steel. Very corrosive Berdan primers, heavily crimped in pockets. ( steel cases hardly crimped at all).

Most ammo these days is FTF, but occasionally one gets a good batch. Originally surplussed through Interarms, which also repacked a lot into 20 round boxes with their label. Otherwise sold in large crates, in Typical French re-sealable Zinc cans.( sliding trapdoor). Military packets give all indications of various makers of ammo and components etc.

regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics
 

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Hi,

made during the first quarter of 1958 by Cartoucherie de la Seine, located near Le Havre (where the Seine river ends into the 'French' Channel), brass from Compagnie francaise des metaux, located at Serifontaine (north Paris).
Both plants are now closed.

HIH

Cheers
:>
ccmsd
 

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Hi all,

I found some of this ammo at a gun show and it sat in my garage until today. Upon inspecting this ammo, I saw that the corrosiveness from the primers had corroded some of the cases to the point of no return. I am pulling the bullets and I have measured the powder. I have an average median of 51.786 grains that was loaded in these rounds. Some where as high as 54 grains, some were as low as 50 grains. The powder is really a heavy thick stick type, but it seems fine to load up for plinking ammo. Anybody know what kind of powder was in these loads? Also, would somewhere around 49.5 to 50 grains be a good starting point with this stuff to reload into some Korean brass? I would be reloading the old 150 grain bullets too.


Thanks,


Mike
 

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Hi all,

I found some of this ammo at a gun show and it sat in my garage until today. Upon inspecting this ammo, I saw that the corrosiveness from the primers had corroded some of the cases to the point of no return. I am pulling the bullets and I have measured the powder. I have an average median of 51.786 grains that was loaded in these rounds. Some where as high as 54 grains, some were as low as 50 grains. The powder is really a heavy thick stick type, but it seems fine to load up for plinking ammo. Anybody know what kind of powder was in these loads? Also, would somewhere around 49.5 to 50 grains be a good starting point with this stuff to reload into some Korean brass? I would be reloading the old 150 grain bullets too.


Thanks,


Mike
bolt gun?

If it were me, I would start a bit lower than that,

just to be safe
 

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hi o
Weigh a few of the original cases and a few of the ones you intend to reload. If they are close, 49-50 grains should be OK. If the new ones weigh a lot more, then start a couple of grains lower.

JMHO

Ray
I pulled all of the bullets today, the powder is a really thick, short,stick type. Hope that this powder isnt that difficult to work with when measuring it. Never really saw powder like this before. Have any of you guys had any experience with it before? When I pulled the bullets, some of them were so corroded they are garbage. All from these bad primers.

Mike
 

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E
Mike

I doubt that corroded bullets and cases are caused by corrosive primers. It's more likely the powder doing this. You may want to re-think your idea of salvaging it.

JMHO

Ray
Some of the cases were corroded to the point of having the bottom of the cases splitting. This is all due to mercury in the primer salts. Some of the bullets had the bottom corroded too. All in all, the powder looks fine. It seems like it should be fine. I will start off at a conservative level. I will start at 50 grains. I averaged 35 rounds pulled from 150 and it come out to be just around 52 grains that was loaded. As i wrote above, there were rounds that had as low as 49, up to 54 grains.


Mike
 

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E

Some of the cases were corroded to the point of having the bottom of the cases splitting. This is all due to mercury in the primer salts. Some of the bullets had the bottom corroded too. All in all, the powder looks fine. It seems like it should be fine. I will start off at a conservative level. I will start at 50 grains. I averaged 35 rounds pulled from 150 and it come out to be just around 52 grains that was loaded. As i wrote above, there were rounds that had as low as 49, up to 54 grains.


Mike
Mercuric primers aren;t typically corrosive. Ones using perchlorate as the oxidizer generally are. The mercury does weaken brass, or is said to.
 
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