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I picked up this .22 Mauser at a gunshow last weekend. It has very graceful lines and some lovely features like the raised cheek piece and the ivory front sight bead with a removable sight hood. I was hoping someone with a reference book could give me a model number and the time frame of when it was produced. SN 222713. With the exception of some shallow dents on the right side of the pistol grip and some minor dented areas in the checkering, the rifle is in exceptionally well preserved condition with no signs of refinishing. The main thing that I am looking for opinions on, is the sling. The sling just doesn't look to me, like something the Germans would have done. You will note that the loops are formed with rivets at both ends. It is a short sling, with no adjustment, that would only fit over the shoulder of a boy. I'm wondering if it might have been added after it arrived in the USA? I believe the stains in the leather are the result of mold growth. This may clean up, but I have not tried. Judging from the wear on the sling swivels, where they have contacted the leather, the sling has been on the rifle for a long period of time. If it were yours, would you leave this sling in place or remove it?
 

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I have a hard time seeing the Germans put a sling on a rifle that can neither be adjusted nor removed. Still, I suppose anything is possible on a commercial .22. I would leave the sling alone since it came on the rifle.
 

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nice rifle. I'd say the sling was back yard applied. 'Ms' series mauser's are much harder to find than the 'es' series.. Those rifles sell on line in the 1200.00 range..Where the es type sell for
around 1/2 of that..
 

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Very nice rifle. Not sure about the origins of the sling, but I believe the stock may have been refinished a long time ago. The checkering doesn't appear as deep as I've seen on previous examples of this model, and there also should also be a "Mauser" cartouche stamped into the right hand side of the butt-stock that is normally deep and well-defined. Front sight is likely a replacement as well, however front sight hood is certainly correct. Still a very good specimen. If you ever decide to part ways with it, please let me know. thanks, Sam
 

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The gun looks really good, someone refinished the wood and the Mauser dry stamp was lost, that happens in many cases, but the gun is absolutely original, including the front sight, the sling, well I've never seen an original civilian Mauser sling on a rifle; below pics of my 410's, and detail of the front sight, in one I took out the cover to show the front sight more clearly=Serial #'s of my guns are 202XXX and 207XXX=

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Raul, my own gut impression of the wood, is that it has not been refinished. What specific factors lead you to conclude that it was refinished? Is there any possibility that Mauser might have made some of these without the Mauser stock cartouche? Would closeup pictures of any area of the stock lead to a conclusion regarding refinishing, one way or the other? If so, I'll post some more pictures.
 

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Don't mean to gore anyone's ox, but it looks to me like the metal might have been redone (the serial numbers in your second set of pictures look a little washed out). Given this possibility, it's resonable to assume that the wood was also refinished and the cartouche lost in the process.
I am still debating whether to "refurbish" the wood and metal on my early, 5-digit SN Mm410B. It has been well used and shows it, but there are no pits/rust and the wood is sound. Any thoughts?
 

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Imarelic, I said the wood has been redone because there's no traces of the dry stamp on the right side of the stock, and I doubt that Mauser ever sent to the market a piece without it, take a clos look, maybe with a magnifier glass of the rear part of the right side of the stock, maybe there are some traces of the stamp-In one of my 410, the one with a high gloss finishing, someone refinished it and the cartouche is gone, it happens frequently.
 

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Imarelic, I said the wood has been redone because there's no traces of the dry stamp on the right side of the stock, and I doubt that Mauser ever sent to the market a piece without it, take a clos look, maybe with a magnifier glass of the rear part of the right side of the stock, maybe there are some traces of the stamp-In one of my 410, the one with a high gloss finishing, someone refinished it and the cartouche is gone, it happens frequently.
raul,
Could you post a picture of this "dry" stamp you`re talking about?
Was this a feature commonly found on all series of Mauser .22`s or just the Mm410`s?
 

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Gewehrpatrone, the pic below shows the dry stamp I mentioned-This stamp was applied to all the civilan Mauser 22's, never saw one on the DSM's or the KKW's-
 

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Gewehrpatrone, the pic below shows the dry stamp I mentioned-This stamp was applied to all the civilan Mauser 22's, never saw one on the DSM's or the KKW's-
Ah so! I am quite aware of this stamp on my ES340`s but never heard it identified as such.
I don`t believe Jon Speed`s book mentions this nomenclature (dry stamp), am I in error or can you shed some light onto the term?
Thanks!
 

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cant say anything about the pattern, IMO its just a trademark; about my expression "dry stamp" it may not exist in english, I just translated directly from spanish, which is my mother language
 
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