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The 2007 Coggansfield Third Annual Digest of Late British Imperial Longarm Prices, 2005-2006

May 2007

© D.P. Munro 2007, Baltimore, Md., U.S.A.
Pp. 1-40 total.

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I am very pleased to present the third annual Coggansfield digest of Martini and Lee prices. This edition covers sales over the period 2005-2007. We cover longarms (rifles and carbines) of the following types:

• Martini-Henry.
• Martini-Metford.
• Martini-Enfield.
• Lee-Metford.
• Lee-Enfield.

Where data are available, I include pricing on rare trials and experimental variants of the above. In a departure from previous years, with this edition I have also begun, for some models, distinguishing prices among subvariations.

This is a long post, and so is done in four parts: this post and the three immediately following. This post describes the methodology, etc., while the following posts contain the actual pricing information.

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A. Methodology.

As in previous years, what I have done below is compare my own price research to the prices published in two respected guides (one in book form and one on line). I mean no disrespect to the publishers. Their research is perhaps more extensive than mine and I have found their guides very useful, despite reporting what seem to me to be prices on the low side.

If you print out this posting, or scroll down to read its contents, you will find a comparison of observed prices for dozens of Martini rifles and carbines and Enfield or Enfield-related rifles and carbines — 90 models or submodels in total. (In truth, many people probably do not know that there even are that many Martini or Lee possibilities.)

The comparisons are between these:

• Ned Schwing (ed.), Standard Catalog of Military Firearms: The Collector’s Price and Reference Guide, 2nd ed. (Iola, Wis.: Krause Publications, 2003).

• Manowar’s Firearm Values, Internet site (
http://www.fo.com/cr-buds/prices.asp).

• My own (“Coggansfield”) observations over the past two years, aggregated and averaged.

In my experience, dealer claims to the contrary, very few milsurps are in anything better than NRA “very good” condition. This being the case, for Schwing and Manowar, I have given their prices for “very good” rifles. Readers should bear in mind that their prices for “excellent” and “mint” items are higher, sometimes considerably so. (If you are unsure what I mean by all this, go to the web site,
http://www.auctionarms.com/help/NRAGrade.cfm, for a description of the American National Rifle Association’s grading standards for antique firearms.)

As for my own price figures, I give the highest and lowest observed price for each type of rifle, regardless of condition, though in each case I describe its condition as best I can (thought mostly I have to trust sellers’ often exaggerated claims in this respect). I also give the average price of all the rifles of that type that I tracked. I do not track sporterised weapons which, as Manowar notes, should never be valued higher than a “fair” non-sporterised version of the same arm. I also give the percentage price change for each model between this year’s Coggansfield average and last year’s (though, for models with only a handful of sales a year, no inferences should be drawn from annual average price fluctuations).

This question of dealers’ descriptions is an important one. I base my descriptions on dealers’ descriptions, just as purchasers base their offering prices on those same descriptions. For the firearms below, I continue to use the dealer description, even if I subsequently find it to be inflated. For example, if a rifle is described as “excellent” and sells for $1,000, I record that as a grand for an excellent rifle, even if I later find out that the weapon was no better than “good.” This is because the $1,000 was offered for an “excellent” weapon (even if incorrectly described), and this reflects the market. If I were retroactively to downgrade the description to “good,” this would not reflect the market, as the buyer did not get to downgrade his price to, say, $500.

For each weapon, the reader should have seven figures to compare: Schwing’s average figure, Manowar’s average figure, my current average figure, my current high figure, my current low figure, my previous average figure and, finally, the percentage difference between this year’s average price and last year’s. Between the seven of them, these figures should give the reader a reasonably good picture of the current state of the market for any given arm.

Having said this, “the market” is just that: people buying and selling. There is no right or wrong, just how high people are prepared to pay or how low they are prepared to sell. This may offend some readers’ preconceived notions of what is “fair.” This digest passes no judgement on whether or not certain sales are “fair” or not; I just report the prices as I find them. However, particularly in cases of very uncommon weapons, one anomalously high or low sale can distort the picture. In instances such as these, I have pointed out, not that the resulting average is “right” or “wrong,” but that it may have been skewed.

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B. Time Span.

I average my data over two-year increments of time, in this case, the years 2005 and 2006. In other words, if below you see that a certain type of arm had a Coggansfield average sales price of $600, that means that this was the average sale (or asking) price for this model over period 2005-2006.

The reason is this: many of the weapons listed below are very scarce, with only a handful of sales a year. If a given type of arm has three sales a year, and one of these sales is very expensive, this will greatly impact my Coggansfield average price. A truer price picture is given by giving an average of two years’ worth of sales, thus reducing the effect of aberrantly high or low individual sales.

I should add that each data point represents a sale or an asking price, not a firearm. If the same weapon sells three times in two years, it counts as three data points, not one. With rare arms, this frequently occurs, with dealers increasing the price with every sale. I track sales at dozens of Internet sites weekly, sometimes daily, and I have become so familiar with some individual firearms that I see over and over again that I consider them to be old friends. It is particularly interesting to review the differences among the dealers’ claims about the same firearm and to watch the steadily hiking price. The most extreme example I have seen of rapid price escalation was that of a particularly nice, 1922-dated, low-serial-numbered SMLE mk. V. It was bought for $195 in late autumn 2005 at a gunshow in the American deep South and sold in early 2006 for $1,478.53 on one of the U.S. on-line auction web sites. (This is gun is unique in that, in this edition’s SMLE mk. V section, it, the same gun, represents both the highest and lowest price for this model over 2005-2006.)

In future editions, I will retain the two-year methodology and use a rolling average. Thus, while this index averages sales over 2005 and 2006, next year’s will review sales from 2006 and 2007. In this manner, readers will still be able to keep track of trends in pricing.

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C. Limitations.

A note on caveats for each of the sources of figures used here: Schwing, Manowar and Coggansfield.

First, Schwing’s work is probably the most comprehensive — but it was published in 2003, meaning that it probably used 2002 data. Prices have only gone up since then, making Schwing’s cited prices dated and on the low side.

Second, Manowar’s web site was last updated on June 1, 2005, so it is reasonably current. Its given prices are for the most part considerably lower than my findings. The drawback with Manowar’s site is that it mostly does not distinguish among modified models of firearms (for example, a Lee-Metford mk. I and a mk. I* are counted as the same thing, when in fact the former is far more rare than the latter and correspondingly more expensive).

Third, my own findings are marred by the fact that, obviously, I am just one person and cannot make all that extensive a review. My methodology is to track auction sales in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States (primarily the latter), gunboard “WTS” sales, dealer asking prices in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the U.K. and the U.S. (again, primarily the latter), and asking prices at the Baltimore, Maryland gunshow, the United States’ largest annual antique firearms event.

In regard to auctions and gunboard WTS listings, I only count actual sales. As for dealers and the gunshow, I count asking prices, as that is all I have to go on (I have no way of knowing if the items sold for the asking price or not). In this respect, my figures probably lead to slightly inflated averages, though the difference is unlikely to be great.

Because there are limits to number of sales I can track for each type of rifle, my numbers for each type are sometimes small — sometimes just a couple of rifles for rarer types. In each case, I state the number of rifles reviewed by me, e.g., “n=2” (meaning I tracked two rifles). Additionally, I cannot track sales of guns by “mom and pop” retailers, which frequently do not have web sites. Because sales at such establishments are often cheaper than sales from high-end, on-line dealers, my inability to include mom-and-pop sales may again have the effect of inflating my average prices. On the other hand, this factor is mitigated somewhat by the fact that I only consider scarce weapons — no SMLE mk. III* or no. 4 rifles, for example — and these little establishments do not often stock unusual firearms of the sort covered in this index.

One strength of my methodology is that I track overseas sales too. I regularly review dealer sales, WTS postings and auctions in New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the U.K. Below, all prices are in, or have been converted to, U.S. dollar values. All sales are U.S. sales (or foreign sales to U.S. customers) unless otherwise stated. As a matter of general principle, I have found the hierarchy of expensiveness to be as follows (working from cheapest to costliest):

• Australia.
• New Zealand.
• Canada.
• United States.
• United Kingdom.

There are too many sales of certain types of gun for me to be able to track. Readers should be aware that this index does not cover the following:

• Rifle no. 1, mk. III* (Short Magazine Lee-Enfield).
• Rifle no. 3, mks. I and I* (Pattern 1914 or P-14).
• Rifle no. 4, all marks.
• Rifle no. 5, both marks (“jungle carbine”).
• SMLE .410 single-loader musket.

Additionally, small-calibre training weapons (e.g., rifle no. 2, all marks) are not tracked, and neither are handguns.

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D. Final Observations.

What has changed between this year and last? The short answer is, not terribly much.

In terms of Lees, an Italian distributor recently purchased from that county’s government a vast store of SMLEs, mostly mk. III and mk. III*. These were weapons provided to the Italian government by the British and the end of the Second World War. As may be expected, condition varies greatly. As these guns are being marketed exclusively in Europe, they have had no impact on prices in the North America or Australasia or, for that matter, the U.K., whose extraordinarily strict gun laws make importation virtually impossible.

Certain Lee models remain perennial favourites, even if they cannot be described as rare or even particularly scarce. A good MLM mk. II can easily fetch over $1,000 and an MLE mk. I, despite a bit of an apparent slowdown last year, will command $850 with no trouble. There seems no particular logic to this when, for example, a nice SMLE mk. I** I.P. will struggle to get $400, despite being made in infinitely smaller numbers than the MLM or MLE.

Lee carbines are a good bet, investmentwise, though buyer fascination with cavalry models inflates the price of them at the expense of scarcer non-cavalry models. For example, the LEC mk. I appears for sale at approximately twice the frequency of the New Zealand carbine. However, the average LEC price is just under $1,200, while a New Zealand carbine sale over $900 is unusual. (This said, the NZ carbines, having been battered by Kiwi cadets for decades, sometimes leave something to be desired in terms of cosmetics, though the bores are usually pretty good.)

The SMLE mk. III (no star), a century old this year, is in increasingly short supply, despite once having been a staple at a thousand of gunshows. Over 2005-2006, I encountered 29 SMLE mk. III sales, as against 49 MLE mk. I sales. (I do not mean to suggest that there were only 29 mk. III sales over 2005-2006, only that I ran across only 29, compared to 49 MLEs; this should give a rough indication that mk. IIIs are not as common as they once were.) I am not a SMLE collector. However, if I were, I would be hanging onto my mk. IIIs, particularly early dated, non-tinkered-with specimens. Remember, there was a time not all that long ago when people offloaded their SMLE mk. Is for a song, thinking they would never be worth anything.

Turning to Martinis, there are two things to note — and they hit you in the face if you look. The first is that there is by now a noticeable glut of MHR mk. II rifles on the market, at least in North America. International Military Antiques and Atlanta Cutlery are still selling a slew of them, of course. To this must be added a growing legion of guys selling their previously purchased IMA/AC Martinis, often at a loss, because, for some reason, they need now to raise a buck in a hurry. (Unless you buy a Martini or Lee for a notably low price, you should expect to have to hang onto it for several years to make a decent return on your investment.)

And then the is the flood of mk. IIs being imported from Afghanistan.

Two years ago, I thought this was going to be a temporary phenomenon, restricted to individual soldiers returning from a tour of duty and bringing a couple of bazaar-purchased Martinis with them to try their luck on Gunbroker.com. Some of these guys have gone into the import business since then and their offerings pile one on top of the other at the on-line auction sites in the U.S. Often, they have to be relisted six, seven or eight times before selling, frequently at a reduced price. Unless you are interested in the subtleties of model subtype differences, there is little to distinguish these guns. You can pick and choose. If you bid on one but don’t make the reserve, don’t be shy about e-mailing the seller and asking him to lower the reserve to a price you are willing to pay. If he is on his tenth relisting for the gun you want, he may not be in a position to refuse.

Having said all this, these Afghan imports can actually be pretty decent guns (though, for reasons described below, you have to be very careful). Presumably because of the dry Afghan climate, these weapons rarely have any exterior pitting. I myself have bought two, both MHR mk. IIs, an Enfield one and an NA&A. They are both super rifles, with near perfect bores and very strong actions. The drawback they both suffer from is a lack of remaining bluing, a chronic problem with Afghan weapons. Why do the Afghans love wire brushes so much? All the same, if you have one of these Martinis, remember, resist the temptation to reblue it. You will only reduce its value further.

Talk of Afghanistan leads one inevitably to the other Martini matter of note for the year — that is, the continuing tsunami of “Khyber Pass” copies and outright forgeries. Once upon a time, these horrors could be passed off as honest mistakes, perhaps bringback weapons brought home by soldiers who knew no better. Now it is different. A number of professional dealers have moved into this market, peddling the most outrageous rubbish as though it were the real thing. This goes for both Martinis and Lees. Sometimes, these dealers issue mealy-mouthed disclaimers to provide a legal fig leaf. Look for statements such as: “Refurbished in British-financed arsenals in Afghanistan” (rest assured, such arsenals never existed); “some guns may contain some native-made parts”; and, my personal favourite, “barrel lengths may vary.” It is very simple: if you see any gun, anywhere, described in these terms, do not buy it. End of story. These guns will never appreciate in value (or at least not from the prices being asked for them), and they should not be considered safe to fire.

For more information, visit these web sites.

http://www.martinihenry.com/khyberpage.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Enfield#Khyber_Pass_Copies
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martini_Enfield
http://www.gunboards.com/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=199228

In closing, nothing herein should be taken as representing definitive pricing for the named firearms. This digest is simply made up of calculations based on observations. It reflects the market, but the market can be “wrong.” For example, there are instances below of extremely rare firearms selling for extraordinarily low prices simply because the seller did not know what he had. Likewise, there are instances where firearms have sold for considerably above the sorts of prices one might reasonably expect, again because of ignorance on the part of the buyer. If you are new to firearms purchasing, I recommend you consult an appraiser before making any steep outlays. The author accepts no responsibility for selling or purchasing decisions made by readers of this index.

If you have firearms sales and pricing data you would like included in the next edition of this digest, covering 2006-2007, please e-mail Doug Munro at
[email protected] All information is strictly confidential: buyer’s and sellers’ names are never disclosed.

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E. Notes and References.

This section expands all abbreviations used herein and provides an extensive bibliography of sources used.

________________


E.1. — Pattern/Type Code.

• Natal Pattern (capitalized, no parentheses) = official or customarily used subpattern designation.
• (Natal pattern) (in parentheses, not capitalized) = unofficial subpattern designation.
• Type 1, type 2, etc. = informal subpattern designation used by author.

________________


E.2. — Facility Abbreviations.

• BE: Blenheim Engineering Co.
• BRF: Birmingham Repair Facility (Bagot Street or Sparkbrook).
• BSA: Birmingham Small Arms Co. (thus named to 1872 and after 1897).
• BSA&M: Birmingham Small Arms & Metal Co. (same company, thus named Dec. 1872-1897).
• EFD: RSAF Enfield.
• HB: Henry Barrel Co.
• HRB: Henry Rifled Barrel Co. (formal name of for HB).
• LSA: London Small Arms Co.
• NA&A: National Arms & Ammunition Co.
• RSAF: Royal Small Arms Factory (at Enfield or Sparkbrook).
• RSARF: Royal Small Arms Repair Facility (at Bagot Street or Sparkbrook).
• Sk: RSAF Sparkbrook.

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E.3. — Firearm Abbreviations.

• I.P.: India Pattern.
• LEC: Lee-Enfield carbine.
• LMC: Lee-Metford carbine.
• MEAC: Martini-Enfield artillery carbine.
• MECC: Martini-Enfield cavalry carbine.
• MER: Martini-Enfield rifle.
• MHAC: Martini-Henry artillery carbine.
• MHCC: Martini-Henry cavalry carbine.
• MHR: Martini-Henry rifle.
• MMAC: Martini-Metford artillery carbine.
• MMCC: Martini-Metford cavalry carbine.
• MMR: Martini-Metford rifle.
• MLE: Magazine Lee-Enfield rifle.
• MLM: Magazine Lee-Metford rifle.


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E.4 — Bibliography.


Ron Bester & Associates. 2003. Small Arms of the Anglo-Boer War, 1899-1902: A Comprehensive Study of all Rifles, Carbines, Handguns and Edged Weapons Used by the Opposing Forces During the Anglo-Boer War. Brandfort, S.A.: Kraal Publishers.

Birmingham Small Arms Co. (BSA). [1913]. B.S.A. Rifles and Rifle Sights: A Catalogue of Military Rifles, Target Match Rifles, High Velocity Sporting Rifles, Military and Sporting Carbines, B.S.A. Patent Rifle Sights, B.S.A. .410 Bore Shot Guns, B.S.A. Air Rifles, War Office Miniature Rifles, B.S.A. Miniature Bolt Rifles, Martini Miniature Rifles, Tubes for Sporting Shot Guns, &c. Manufactured by the Birmingham Small Arms Co. Ltd., fifth ed. Birmingham, U.K.: BSA.

David W. Edgecombe. 2003. Defending the Dominion: Canadian Military Rifles, 1855-1955. Ottawa, Ont.: Service Publications.

Robert W. Edwards. 2003. India’s Enfields: The Lee-Enfield Rifle in India, 1900-2004, 4th ed. Keedysville, Md.: Consortium Press.

Dennis Lewis. 1996. Martini-Henry .450 Rifles and Carbines. British Firearms series. Tucson, Ariz.: Excalibur Publications.

Ray McMahon. 1997. “The First Lee-Metford: Rifle, .303-inch, Magazine Mk. I.” In International Arms & Militaria Collector 3(2) (magazine no. 10).

_____. 1998. “The ‘Volunteer’ or Commercial Pattern Lee-Metford Rifles and Carbines.” In International Arms & Militaria Collector 4(2) (magazine no. 14).

_____. 1999. “The Lee-Metford & Lee-Enfield .303" Carbines.” In International Arms & Militaria Collector 4(4) (magazine no. 16).

David Pam. 1998. The Royal Small Arms Factory: Enfield & Its Workers. Enfield, U.K.: David Pam.

Alan M. Petrillo. 1992. The Lee Enfield Number 1 Rifles. British Firearms series. Tucson, Ariz.: Excalibur Publications.

_____. 1992. The Lee Enfield Number 4 Rifles. British Firearms series. Tucson, Ariz.: Excalibur Publications.

_____. 1994. British Services Rifles and Carbines, 1888-1900. British Firearms series. Tucson, Ariz.: Excalibur Publications.

_____. 1994. The Number 5 Jungle Carbine. British Firearms series. Tucson, Ariz.: Excalibur Publications.

E.G.B. Reynolds. 1960. The Lee-Enfield Rifle: Its History and Development from First Designs to the Present Day. London, U.K.: Herbert Jenkins.

Ian D. Skennerton (ed.). 1977, 1979, 1987, 1993, 1998. List of Changes in British War Material in Relation to Edged Weapons, Firearms and Associated Ammunition and Accoutrements. In five volumes. Margate, Qld.: Ian D. Skennerton.

_____. 1982. The British Service Lee: The Lee-Metford and Lee-Enfield Rifles and Carbines, 1880-1980. London, U.K.: Arms & Armour Press.

_____. 1993. The Lee-Enfield Story: The Lee-Metford, Lee-Enfield, S.M.L.E. and No. 4 Series Rifles and Carbines, 1880 to the Present. Piqua, Ohio: I.D.S.A. Books.

_____. 1994. “.303 Rifle, No. 1, S.M.L.E. Marks III and III*: Parts Identification & Lists, S.M.L.E. Series Notes, Exploded Parts Drawings, Descriptions, Accessories & Fittings.” Small Arms Identification Series, No. 1. Piqua, Ohio: I.D.S.A. Books.

_____. 1994. “.303 Rifle, No. 5 Mk I: Parts Identification & Lists, No. 5 Series Notes, Exploded Parts Drawings, Descriptions, Accessories & Fittings.” Small Arms Identification Series, No. 4. Piqua, Ohio: I.D.S.A. Books.

_____. 1997. “.303 Magazine Lee-Metford and Magazine Lee-Enfield: Parts Identification Lists, M.L.M. & M.L.E. Series Notes, Exploded Parts Drawings, Descriptions, Accessories & Fittings.” Small Arms Identification Series, No. 7. Piqua, Ohio: I.D.S.A. Books.

_____. 1998. “.303 Pattern 1914 Rifle & Sniping Variants: Parts Identification Lists, No. 3 (P ’14) Rifle Notes, Exploded Parts Drawings, Descriptions, Accessories & Fittings.” Small Arms Identification Series, No. 10. Piqua, Ohio: I.D.S.A. Books.

_____. 2001. “.303 Rifle, No. 4 Marks I, 1*, 1/2, 1/3 & 2: Parts Identification Lists, No. 4 Series Notes, Exploded Parts Drawings, Descriptions, Accessories & Fittings.” Small Arms Identification Series, No. 2, second impression. Piqua, Ohio: I.D.S.A. Books.

_____. 2001. The Broad Arrow: British and Empire Factory Production, Proof, Inspection, Armourers, Unit & Issue Markings. Grants Pass, Ore.: Arms & Militaria Press.

_____. 2002. “.450 & .303 Martini Rifles and Carbines: Parts Identification & Lists, M.H., M.M. & M.E. Notes, Exploded Parts Drawings, Armourers Instructions, Accessories & Fittings.” Small Arms Identification Series, No. 15. Grants Pass, Ore.: Arms & Militaria Press.

Ian Skennerton and Robert Faris. 2004. “The First .303 M.L.M. Carbine.” In International Arms & Militaria Collector, magazine no. 22.

Service Publications (SP). [No date.] Small Arms Unit Marks: Applied to Rifles, Carbines, Swords, Bayonets, Dirks, etc. by British and Canadian Ordnance Corps. Ottawa, Ont.: SP.

Charles R. Stratton. 2000. The Pattern 1914 and U.S. Model 1917 Rifles. British Enfield Rifles series, vol. 4. Tustin, Calif.: North Cape Publications.

_____. 2002. SMLE (No. 1) Rifles Mk I and Mk II, 2nd ed., rev. British Enfield Rifles series, vol. 1. Tustin, Calif.: North Cape Publications.

_____. 2003. Lee-Enfield No. 4 and No. 5 Rifles, 2nd ed., rev. British Enfield Rifles series, vol. 2. Tustin, Calif.: North Cape Publications.

B.A. Temple and I.D. Skennerton. 1983. A Treatise on the British Military Martini: The Martini-Henry, 1869-c.1900. Kilcoy, Australia: B.A. Temple.

_____. 1989. A Treatise on the British Military Martini: The .40 & .303 Martinis, 1880-c. 1920. Burbank, Australia: B.A. Temple.

_____. 1995. A Treatise on the British Military Martini: Manufacture, Training Arms & Accessories. Kilcoy, Australia: B.A. Temple.

David Williams. 2004. The Birmingham Gun Trade. Stroud, U.K.: Tempus Publishing, Ltd.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
F. Firearms Prices, 2005-2006.

Section F of this digest presents average sales and asking prices for the firearms covered by this report, namely, (a) the Martini-Henry family and its derivatives and (b) the Lee-Metford and -Enfield group.

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F.1. Martini Series, by Type.

The Martini-Henry was Britain’s first purpose-built breech-loading service rifle. The Snider family of firearms that preceded the Martini was mostly, though not exclusively, made up of conversions of the muzzle-loading Pattern 1853 Enfield rifled musket and associated firearms (Skennerton 2002:5). First approved in 1871, between them, the Martini-Henry and its immediate offspring, the Martini-Metford and the Martini-Enfield, gave over 30 years’ service to the British Empire.

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F.1.1. — Martini-Henrys.


MH • Martini-Henry Rifle,† Mk. I.††

Schwing (very good): $900.
Manowar (very good): $800-$1,100.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,720.70 (n=30).

Coggansfield high: $3,700 (retailer, U.K., unknown pattern, presumed fine). Apr. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $600 (live auction, Australia, Third Pattern, presumed very good). Sep. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,899.25 (n=16).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -9.4 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are four MHR mk. I subtypes available to collectors: (a) the Second Pattern (early); (b) Second Pattern (interim); (c) Third Pattern; and (d) Third Pattern (upgraded). (Of the First Pattern, only a pattern and a sample arm were made.) I have never encountered a Second Pattern (early) arm, with safety catch, for sale, though I suspect that, were one to became available, it would attract a considerable premium over other MHR mk. I subtypes. The Second Pattern (interim) is the most common MHR mk. I, of which 2,100 were shipped to Canada in 1874. This “Canadian cache” is the source of most mk. Is in North America. Third pattern MHRs are encountered less often than Second Pattern (interim) ones, but do not appear to fetch a premium, pricewise. The fourth possibility is the Third Pattern (upgraded), which is a Third Pattern arm partially upgraded to mk. II. Based on an observation of four sales, these appear to fetch about 25 percent less than the regular Third Pattern and Second Pattern (interim) arms in North America.

_____

MH • Martini-Henry Rifle,† Mk. II.†

Schwing (very good): $900.
Manowar (very good): $725-$1,050.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $963.97 (n=35).

Coggansfield high: $1,250 (retailer, U.K., presumed fine). Apr. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $270 (live auction, Australia, presumed good). Oct. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $902.69 (n=26).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +6.8 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† MHR mk. IIs come in two varieties: (a) those converted from mk. I and (b) those new made. The mk. I-to-II conversions can be further subdivided according to the pattern of mk. I they were converted from. None of these variations fetches a premium over the others, with the possible exception of mk. IIs converted from mk. I (early) rifles, whose early 1872 date may add some value for novelty-related reasons.

_____

MH • Martini-Henry Rifle,† Mk. III, Type 1.††

Schwing (very good): $900.
Manowar (very good): $675-$975.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $747.21 (n=35).

Coggansfield high: $1,696 (retailer, U.K., presumed fine). Apr. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $315 (live auction, Australia, presumed good+). Oct. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $765.66 (n=22).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -2.4 percent.

† Two MHR mk. III subtypes (type 1 and type 2); pricing distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† Type 1: this is the basic MHR mk. III model.

_____

MH • Martini-Henry Rifle,† Mk. III, Type 2.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $2,739 (n=2).

Coggansfield high: $4,878 (retailer, Australia, very good+, magazine not present). Unknown point in 2006.
Coggansfield low: $600 (live auction, Australia, good, magazine not present). Oct. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Two MHR mk. III subtypes (type 1 and type 2); pricing distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† Type 2: the MHR mk. III, type 2 is equipped with a loop on the right side of the receiver, into which slots the tang of the Arbuthnot quick-loader magazine. Only 20 type 2s were made, all shipped to Queensland, Australia. The Coggansfield low price of $600 cannot truly be said accurately to reflect the market; rather, the auctioneer appears not to have known what he had. Some time in 2006 another type 2, admittedly in better condition but still without the magazine, retailed in Australia for $4,878. Two others had previously sold in Australia for $7,500 (with the magazine still attached) and $3,457 (without the magazine).

_____

MH • Martini-Henry Rifle,† Mk. IV.††

Schwing (very good): $900.
Manowar (very good): $700-$1,000.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $703.53 (n=45).

Coggansfield high: $1,355 (retailer, U.K., very good). Jun. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $308 (live auction, Australia, presumed very good). May 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $713.71 (n=41)
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -1.4 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† MHR mk. IVs come in three varieties, customarily designated the A Pattern (converted from Enfield-Martini, First Pattern) , B Pattern (converted from Enfield-Martini, Second Pattern) and C Pattern (new made). None fetches a price premium over the others.

_____

MH • Martini-Henry Rifle, Mk. V.

See Martini-Metford rifle, mk. I.

_____



MH • Martini-Henry Rifle, Mk. VI.

See Martini-Metford rifle, mk. II.

_____

MH • Martini-Henry (Cavalry) Carbine,† Mk. I.††

Schwing (very good): $1,250.
Manowar (very good): $1,150-$1,450.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $742.72 (n=9).

Coggansfield high: $1,320 (personal sale, very good). Jul. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $505 (on-line auction, commercial trade pattern model, good). Jul. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $713.19 (n=8).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +4.1 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are two patterns of MHCC mk. I: (a) the First Pattern (without backsight-cover screws or sling swivels) and (b) the Second pattern (with backsight-cover screws and often with sling swivels). The First Pattern arms are very scarce but I have not seen enough sales to state how much of a premium they fetch, if any, over the Second Pattern.

_____

MH • Martini-Henry Garrison Artillery Carbine.†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Pattern arm and/or sample arms only made.

_____

MH • Martini-Henry Artillery Carbine, Mk. I.†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $843.43 (n=7).

Coggansfield high: $1,326 (retailer, Netherlands, presumed very good+). Dec. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $655 (live auction, Australia, presumed very good+). May 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $839.17 (n=3).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +0.5 percent.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

MH • Martini-Henry Artillery Carbine, Mk. II.†

Schwing (very good): $1,250.
Manowar (very good): $1,100-$1,400.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $804.67 (n=3).

Coggansfield high: $1,200 (personal sale, fine). Jul. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $375 (on-line auction, poor+). Jun. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $787.50 (n=2).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +2.2 percent.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

MH • Martini-Henry Artillery Carbine,† Mk. III.

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Pattern arm and/or sample arms only made.

________________


F.1.2. — Enfield-Martinis.


EM • Enfield-Martini Rifle,† Mk. I, First Pattern.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Two EMR mk. I subtypes (First Pattern and Second Pattern); pricing distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† Complicated rifle, looking like a .402 version of the .40 Pattern 1883 Experimental Rifle.

_____

EM • Enfield-Martini Rifle,† Mk. I, Second Pattern.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $11,250.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $11,250 (approx. value of trade between dealers, Australia). Autumn 2005.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $11,250.00 (n=1), same gun as above.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Two EMR mk. I subtypes (First Pattern and Second Pattern); pricing distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† A much simpler rifle than the First Pattern. The Second Pattern looks like a .402 version of the MHR mk. IV.

________________


F.1.3. — Martini-Metfords.


MM • Martini-Metford Rifle,† Mk. I.

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Pattern arm and/or sample arms only made.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Rifle, Mk. I, Modified (Western Australia pattern).†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,272 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $1,272 (live auction, Australia, commercial trade pattern model, fine). Oct. 2006.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Rifle,† Mk. II.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $460.00 (n=2).

Coggansfield high: $495 (retail, rebarrelled with Enfield barrel, varnished wood, very good). Jan. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $425 (on-line auction, rebarrelled with Enfield barrel, good+). Mar. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $460.00 (n=2), same two guns as above.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† Leaving aside colonial variations (Canada and Natal patterns, etc.), the MMR mk. II has two subtypes: (a) that retaining its original Lewes Patent sights and (b) that with a barleycorn substituted. It seems likely that the Lewes-sighted version, if one still extant were found, would fetch a premium over the barleycorn type. However, this cannot be stated with certainty as no sales of either have been recorded. The hypothesis is non-applicable for the two sales observed here, as both specimens had been rebarrelled with standard Enfield barrels.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Rifle, Mk. II,† Canada Pattern.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,555.00 (n=2).

Coggansfield high: $1,600 (personal sale, very good). Jul. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $1,510 (personal sale, very good). Aug. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,600 (n=1).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -2.8 percent.

† This model has no known subtypes.

†† Special order of 1,000 for Canada in 1894. Barleycorn substituted for Lewes Patent sights. Sighted to 1,600 yards for blackpowder instead of cordite. Should be counted in with, not in addition to, the 9,600 made of the base model.


_____

MM • Martini-Metford Rifle,† Mk. II, Natal Pattern.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

† Special order of 760 for Natal in 1894 or 1895. Fitted with a handguard between the nocksform and the backsight. Barleycorn substituted for Lewes Patent sights. Sighted to 1,800 yards for cordite. Should be counted in with, not in addition to, the 9,600 made of the base model.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Rifle (Mk. II),† South Australian Pattern.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,700.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $1,700 (personal sale, refinished wood, otherwise very good). July 2005.
Coggansfield low: N/A

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,700.00 (n=1), same gun as above.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

†† Special order of 500 for South Australia in 1891-92. Though built using a mk.-II-style pinned foreend, the rifle in most other respects resembled the mk. I, modified (Western Australia pattern). The South Australian model carried no mark designation. The conversions were done in 1891 and 1892 by HRB, based on MHR mk. II rifles. The South Australia Martini-Metford is a different model from the MMR mk. II, and so the production figure of 500 should be counted in addition to the 9,600 made of the MMR mk. II base model.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Cavalry Carbine, Mk. I.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. I*.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are two subtypes of MMCC mk. I*. The type 1 MMCC mk. I* was directly converted from MHCC mk. I, with no more than 114 made (possibly as few as 14; the records are ambiguous). The type 2 MMCC mk. I* was an upgrade of the MMCC mk. I, of which 11,150 were made. The sole difference between the mk. I and the mk. I* was the front sight, a bare barleycorn on the mk. I, but protected by wings on the mk. I*. The vast majority of mk. Is appear to have been upgraded to mk. I*, type 2. As these, if encountered, are visually indistinguishable from the type 1, there is little to be gained from hypothesizing about possible price differentials between the two.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Cavalry Carbine, Mk. II.†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,100.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $1,100 (personal sale, excellent-). Jul. 2005.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,100.00 (n=1), same gun as above.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. II*.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $800.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $800 (personal sale, very good). Jul. 2005.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $800.00 (n=1), same gun as above.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are two subtypes of MMCC mk. II*. The type 1 MMCC mk. II* was directly converted from MHAC mk. I, with only 4 made. The type 2 MMCC mk. II* was an upgrade of the MMCC mk. II, of which 850 were made. The sole difference between the mk. II and the mk. II* was the front sight, a bare barleycorn on the mk. II, but protected by wings on the mk. II*. The maximum number of mk. II* carbines there can ever have been is 654, as it is believed that, apart from 200 mk. IIs shipped to Canada in 1894, all other mk. IIs were upgraded to mk. II*, type 2. As these, if encountered, are visually indistinguishable from the type 1, there is little to be gained from hypothesizing about possible price differentials between the two.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Cavalry Carbine, Mk. III.†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,499.67 (n=3).

Coggansfield high: $2,614 (retailer, U.K., presumed very good). Feb. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $935 (live auction, Australia, very good-). Oct. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $950.00 (n=1).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +57.9 percent.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Cavalry Carbine, Mk. III,† Natal Pattern.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $450.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $450 (personal sale, fair-). Jul. 2005.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $450.00 (n=1), same gun as above.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

†† Same as MMCC mk. III but with a three-quarter length handguard.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Artillery Carbine,† Mk. I.

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Pattern arm and/or sample arms only made.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Artillery Carbine, Mk. II.†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $935.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $935 (live auction, Australia, very good-).
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $268.00 (n=1).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +248.9 percent.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Artillery Carbine,† Mk. II*.

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Pattern arm and/or sample arms only made.

_____

MM • Martini-Metford Artillery Carbine, Mk. III.†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $539.57 (n=7).

Coggansfield high: $695 (retail, very good). Oct. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $375 (on-line auction, sporterised and no better than fair). Jun. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $509.17 (n=6).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +6.0 percent.

† This model has no known subtypes.

________________


F.1.4. — Martini-Enfields.


ME • Martini-Enfield Rifle,† Mk. I.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): $700-$875.*
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $511.78 (n=23).

Coggansfield high: $1,250 (retail, commercial pattern, mint). Mar. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $195 (live auction, Australia, presumed very good). Oct. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $512.28 (n=18)
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -0.1 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are two subtypes of MER mk. I: (a) conversions from MHR mk. III and (b), much less commonly, new-made arms (military). Neither fetches a premium over the other.

* Described as “Martini-Enfield mk. 4.” In fact, no such rifle existed. Presumably Manowar means the MER mk. I.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Rifle,† Mk. I*.

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Pattern arm and/or sample arms only made.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Rifle,† Mk. I, Fitted to Take the Pattern 1887 Bayonet.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

† Special order of 500 for Queensland in 1898.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Rifle,† Mk. I, Fitted to Take the Pattern 1888 Bayonet.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,068.33 (n=3).

Coggansfield high: $2,975 (retail, commercial pattern, mint). Nov. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $230 (live auction, New Zealand, commercial pattern with mil. stamps, very good). May 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,487.50 (n=2).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -28.2 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are two subtypes of MER mk. I patt. ’88: (a) military conversions of the MHR mk. III, of which 300 were made by special order for Western Australia, and (b) new-made trade-pattern arms, an unknown quantity of which were made and which may sometimes bear military ownership, though not military manufacture, stamps. None of the 300 Western Australian rifles is known to have survived, so pricing discussion here is restricted to the trade-pattern versions.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Rifle,† Mk. II.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $463.42 (n=12).

Coggansfield high: $1,040 (retail, presumed very good). Feb. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $210 (live auction, Australia, presumed very good). Oct. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $449.81 (n=8).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +3.0 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are two subtypes of MER mk. II: (a) conversions of MHR mk. II and (b), much less commonly, new-made arms (military). Neither fetches a premium over the other.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Rifle,† Mk. II*.

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Pattern arm and/or sample arms only made.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Rifle,† Mk. II (fitted to take the pattern 1887 bayonet).††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

†† Unofficial Western Australia modification.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Rifle,† Mk. II (fitted to take the pattern 1888 bayonet).†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,320.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $1,320 (on-line retailer, excellent). Nov. 2005.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,320.00 (n=1), same gun as above.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

†† Not a militarily approved model, commercial pattern only.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Cavalry Carbine, Mk. I.†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): 361.78 (n=10).

Coggansfield high: $750 (personal sale, very good). Jul. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $165 (live auction, Australia, good). Oct. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $393.18 (n=8).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -8.0 percent.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. I (Natal pattern).††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

†† Colonial variation not mentioned in records. Differs from base MECC mk. I model in having a three-quarter length handguard along the barrel (like the MMCC mk. III, Natal Pattern). Unknown quantity made, but should be counted in with, not in addition to, the 5,990 made of the base model.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. I*.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $196.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $196.00 (live auction, South Africa, very good-). Aug. 2006.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are two subtypes of MECC mk. I*. Officially, only one MECC mk. I* was made, the pattern arm, this being the type 1 (converted from MHR mk. II). It was a rodless version of the mk. I, having no provision for a clearing rod at all. However, in 1906 a small quantity of 1903-dated, mk. I*-stamped, new-made “barrels with bodies” (i.e., barrelled receivers) was sent to South Africa, there to be mated with recycled cavalry carbine woodwork. Issued without rods, these firearms were in effect MECC mk. I* carbines, type 2. Scarce even in South Africa, they are exceedingly rare elsewhere. (There is, for example, almost certainly only one in North America.) As the Pattern Room sample is the only type 1 known to exist, all discussion here pertains to the type 2.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. II.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $800.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $800 (personal sale, fine-). Jul. 2005.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $800.00 (n=1), same gun as above.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† This model has no known subtypes.

†† Special order of 965 for New South Wales, converted from MHAC mk. I. Has no clearing-rod provision.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Artillery Carbine, Mk. I.†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $490.56 (n=25).

Coggansfield high: $750 (retail, good+). Jun. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $158 (on-line auction, New Zealand, good+). Sep. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $497.69 (n=16).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -1.4 percent.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Artillery Carbine,† Mk. I*.

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Pattern arm and/or sample arms only made.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Artillery Carbine,† Mk. II.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $616.00 (n=9)

Coggansfield high: $1,235 (retail, very good+). Dec. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $227 (live auction, New Zealand, good+). Jul. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $574.89 (n=9).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +7.2 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are two subtypes of MEAC mk. II: (a) conversions from MHAC mk. I and (b), much less commonly, new-made arms (military). Neither fetches a premium over the other.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Artillery Carbine,† Mk. II*.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $703 (n=2).

Coggansfield high: $706 (on-line auction, type 1, fine+). Mar. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $700 (personal sale, type 2, very good). Jul. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $700 (n=1), same gun as “low,” above.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +0.4 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† The MEAC mk. II* was a rodless version of the MEAC mk. II. There are two subtypes of MEAC mk. II*: (a) direct conversions from MHAC mk. I, of which 4,481 were made (type 1), and (b) upgrades from MEAC mk. II, upgraded by having a solid, non-rod-accommodating nosecap installed (type 2). It is not known how many were upgraded in this manner. Based on just two known sales, one of each type, it seems that neither fetches a premium over the other.

_____

ME • Martini-Enfield Artillery Carbine, Mk. III.†

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $547.50 (n=6).

Coggansfield high: $850 (on-line auction, excellent). Oct. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $290 (on-line auction, fair+). Jun. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $775.00 (n=2).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -29.4 percent.

† This model has no known subtypes.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
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3,866 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
F.2. Lee Series, by Type.

Reliable as it may have been, by the 1880s the large-calibre, single-shot Martini-Henry represented yesterday’s technology. Accordingly, that decade saw the British War Department undertake various trials with relatively small-bore repeating firearms. The eventual result was the adoption in late 1888 of the Lee-Metford rifle, mk. I, featuring an action and magazine design by James Paris Lee and a rifling system by William Ellis Metford, shooting a .303-inch rimmed version of the Swiss Rubin cartridge (Skennerton 1993:17-45). The the mk. I had a number of flaws, but the basic system proved remarkably resilient. The direct descendants of the MLM Mk. I — Lee-Enfield rifles nos. 1 and 4 — are still in common use in the third world today, almost 12 decades later.

________________


F.2.1. — Trials Lees.


TL • Owen Jones Rifle.

Schwing (very good): $4,750.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

_____

TL • Lee-Burton Rifle.

Schwing (very good): $4,750.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

_____

TL • Improved Lee Rifle.

Schwing (very good): $3,000.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

_____

TL • Magazine Rifle, 1888 Trials Model.

Schwing (very good): $3,750.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

_____

TL • Lee-Enfield Rifle,† Mk. I (experimental sighting model).

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $400.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $400 (retail sale, bought as part of package of 4 rifles, very good-). Oct. 2005.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $400 (n=1), same gun as above.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Possibly a Lockyer experimental rifle. Seller did not know the rifle was an experimental model.

________________


F.2.2. — Lee-Metfords.


MLM • Magazine Lee-Metford Rifle,† Mk. I.††

Schwing (very good): $450.
Manowar (very good): $310-510.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

Note, Manowar does not distinguish between the mk. I and the more common mk. I*.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are five subtypes of MLM mk. I, each characterised by the elimination or addition of certain characteristics vis-à-vis the pattern arm and eventually culminating in a final mk. I subtype virtually indistinguishable from the mk. I*. As no sales of any mk. Is have been observed, further subtype discussion is fruitless.

_____

MLM • Magazine Lee-Metford Rifle,† Mk. I*.††

Schwing (very good): $450.
Manowar (very good): See above.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $940.62 (n=17).

Coggansfield high: $1,500. Tie: 1 (on-line auction, rare non-conversion model [type 5], force-matched bolt, very good-), Jun. 2005; 2 (personal sale, mismatched bolt, very good), Aug. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $400 (retail sale, bought as part of package of 4 rifles, very good). Oct. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $869.97 (n=16).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +8.1 percent.

Note, Manowar does not distinguish between the mk. I and the more common mk. I*.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are five subtypes of MLM mk. I*, the first four being conversions from various subtypes of MLM mk. I and the fifth being a new-made arm. The new-made MLM mk. I* rifles are rare and it may reasonably be expected that buyers would be willing to pay a premium for them. However, as only one sale of a type 5 has been observed, this cannot be stated with certainty, though it bears pointing out that the type 5 reported on here sold for the equal-highest sum of all the MLM mk. I* rifles considered for this analysis. The other four subtypes do not fetch a premium one over the other.

_____

MLM • Magazine Lee-Metford Rifle, Mk. II.†

Schwing (very good): $450.
Manowar (very good): $290-480.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,149.71 (n=21).

Coggansfield high: $1,975 (retail, mismatched bolt, bitser, good-). Jun. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $366 (live auction, Australia, presumed fair). May 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,209.41 (n=22).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -4.9 percent.

Note, Manowar does not distinguish between the mk. II and the less common mk. II*.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

MLM • Magazine Lee-Metford Rifle,† Mk. II*.††

Schwing (very good): $400.
Manowar (very good): See above.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,090 (n=3)

Coggansfield high: $1,225 (on-line auction, Lee-Speed vol. pattern, all matching, excellent-). Oct. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $950 (on-line auction, Lee-Speed vol. pattern, mismatched bolt, bitser, good+). Feb. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $725 (n=3).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +50.3 percent.

Note, Manowar does not distinguish between the mk. II and the less common mk. II*.

† This model has no known subtypes.

†† While the MLM mk. II* has no subtypes, a distinction should be drawn between the commercial models and the military. The commercial ones are somewhat scarce, while the military ones are rare indeed. The average price cited above includes one military rifle, in extremely nice condition, which retailed for a surprisingly modest $1,095. It is doubtful that this represents the true market price for the military specimens.

_____

MLM • Magazine Lee-Metford Cavalry Carbine,† Second Trials Pattern.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,995.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $1,995 (retail, mismatched bolt, very good-). Feb. 2006.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† The 1892 Second Pattern LMC trials carbine had two subtypes. The type 1, of which 100 were made, had a normal MLM-style bolt, a 10-round magazine and no handguard. The type 2, of which 50 were converted from type 1, had a unique trials bolt, a 6-round magazine and a three-quarter-length handguard. Neither type was the same as the 1889 8-round-magazine First Pattern. The specimen reported on here is currently in type 1 configuration but shows evidence of perhaps once having been a type 2. Only three of these carbines are known by me still to exist: this type 1 and two type 2s.

_____

MLM • Magazine Lee-Metford Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. I, Type 1.††

Schwing (very good): $700.
Manowar (very good): $525-685.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $2,075.25 (n=8).

Coggansfield high: $3,500 (retail, all matching, rod and ring removed, very good+). Jun. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $1,100 (live auction, rod present but broken, ring removed, very good). Feb. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,690.83 (n=6).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +22.7 percent.

† Four LMC mk. I subtypes (types 1, 2, 3 and 4); pricing distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† Type 1: base model with D-ring (usually now missing) and butt sling bar.

_____

MLM • Magazine Lee-Metford Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. I, Type 2.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Four LMC mk. I subtypes (types 1, 2, 3 and 4); pricing distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† Type 2: made in spring 1896, with no D-ring but with the sling bar. Rare, 735 made in total.

_____

MLM • Magazine Lee-Metford Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. I, Type 3.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Four LMC mk. I subtypes (types 1, 2, 3 and 4); pricing distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† Type 3: made from summer 1896 onward, with neither D-ring nor sling bar. Rare, probably about 800 made.

_____

MLM • Magazine Lee-Metford Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. I, Type 4.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,900.00 (n=1).

Coggansfield high: $1,900 (on-line auction, all matching, excellent). Sep. 2005.
Coggansfield low: N/A.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† Four LMC mk. I subtypes (types 1, 2, 3 and 4); pricing distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† Type 4: made or assembled in 1899 to mk. I* specifications, i.e., with no provision for a clearing rod. Rare, quantity made unknown but doubtless very small.

________________


F.2.3. — Lee-Enfields.


MLE • Magazine Lee-Enfield Rifle, Mk. I.†

Schwing (very good): $750.
Manowar (very good): $525-850.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,032.55 (n=49).

Coggansfield high: $2,375 (retail, all matching, very good-). Jun. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $270 (live auction, Australia, presumed very good-). Sep. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,035.27 (n=41).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -0.26 percent.

Note, Manowar does not distinguish between the Mk. I and the Mk. I*.

† This model has no known subtypes.

_____

MLE • Magazine Lee-Enfield Rifle,† Mk. I*.††

Schwing (very good): $750.
Manowar (very good): See above.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $742.10 (n=29).

Coggansfield high: $2,550 (retail, all matching, excellent). Dec. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $117 (live auction, Australia, presumed good+). Oct. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $746.13 (n=23).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -0.5 percent.

Note, Manowar does not distinguish between the mk. I and the mk. I*.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† The MLE mk. I* comes in two varieties: (a) the type 1 base model, a rodless version of the mk. I, and (b) the late model type 2, which is fitted with a butt as on a SMLE mk. I (i.e., a butt with a sheet steel buttplate with no trap). I have observed no type 2 sales, so cannot say if the type 2 would fetch a premium over the type 1.

_____

MLE • Magazine Lee-Enfield,† Single-loader Rifle (British conversion).††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition:
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition:

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are possibly a number of subtypes of this firearm, these being differentiated from each other on the basis of what sort of long Lee they were converted from (2,000 were converted in total). However, as as no sales have been observed, speculation is pointless.

_____

MLE • Magazine Lee-Enfield Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. I.††

Schwing (very good): $700.
Manowar (very good): $540-825.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,189.41 (n=17).

Coggansfield high: $3,975 (Retail, all matching, rod removed, excellent). Oct. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $415 (retail, Canada, good). Jan. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,200.77 (n=13).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -0.9 percent.

Note, Schwing and Manowar do not distinguish between the Mk. I and the Mk. I*.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† LEC mk. Is come in two varieties: (a) the earlier type 1, with a low-profile, LMC-style nosecap, and (b) the later type 2, with a higher-profile nosecap. Neither fetches a price premium over the other. It is not known when the higher-profile nosecap came into use. All that can be said is that it was somewhere between s/n 3703 (a type 1) and s/n 8950 (a type 2).

_____

MLE • Magazine Lee-Enfield Cavalry Carbine,† Mk. I*.††

Schwing (very good): $700.
Manowar (very good): See above.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,369.17 (n=6).

Coggansfield high: $2,575 (retail, all matching, billed as “low excellent” but on close inspection no better than good+ [reblued, restained and with inappropriate replacement parts]). Dec. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $630 (on-line auction, New Zealand, very good). Feb. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $912.50 (n=2).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +50.0 percent.

Note, Manowar does not distinguish between the mk. I and the less common mk. I*.

† This model has no known subtypes.

†† Leaving aside rare LMC subtypes, of the three Lee carbine base models — LMC mk. I, LEC mk. I and LEC mk. I* — the mk. I* is by far the least common, despite having been made in the greatest quantity.

_____

MLE • Magazine Lee-Enfield Carbine,† Fitted to Take the Pattern 1888 Bayonet, a.k.a. New Zealand Pattern Carbine.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $766.78 (n=9).

Coggansfield high: $1,475 (retail, very good-). Oct. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $450 (gunshow, very good). Aug. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $831.30 (n= 10).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -7.8 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are three subtypes of NZ carbine: (a) type 1, built on purpose-made receivers with all new parts, of which 1,000 were made; (b) type 2, new made but built on receivers originally intended for LEC mk. I*s, of which about 440 were made; and (c) type 3, either converted from LMC mk. Is or, more likely, built on receivers cannibalized from rejected LMCs, of which about 60 were made. None fetches a price premium over the others, despite the scarcity of the type 3.

_____

MLE • Magazine Lee-Enfield Carbine,† Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) Pattern.††

Schwing (very good): $400.
Manowar (very good): $700-1,200 for Lee-Enfield mk. I or mk. I* conversion ($500-700 for Lee-Metford conversion).
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,097.11 (n=19).

Coggansfield high: $1,795 (retail, very good+). Mar. 2005.
Coggansfield low: $500 (gunshow, mismatched bolt, very good+). Oct. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $866.11 (n=18).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +26.7 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† There are three subtypes of RIC carbine, converted, in declining order of production quantity, from LEC mk. I* (8,000), LEC mk. I (2,000) and LMC mk. I (1,200). None fetches a price premium over the others.

________________


F.2.4. — Charger Loading Lees.


CL • Charger Loading Lee-Metford Magazine Rifle,† Mk. II.††

Schwing (very good): $405 (Schwing’s formula is 10 percent less than base rifle).
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $1,675.00 (n=5).

Coggansfield high: $2,595 (retail, Lee-Speed vol. pattern, all matching, near mint). May 2005.
Coggansfield low: $1,150 (retail, Lee-Speed vol. pattern, all matching, very good+, some custom features). Mar. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,423.20 (n=5).
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +17.7 percent.

Note, there is no CLLM mk. I.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† CLLM mk. IIs come in two varieties: (a) those converted from MLM mk. II and (b) those new made (commercial Lee-Speed “Territorial Service Pattern” rifles). The commercial CLLMs are scarce, while the military conversions are outright rare. It is quite possible that buyers would pay a premium for a military model as against a commercial one. However, as no military sale has been observed, this must remain conjecture. All five rifles reviewed for this analysis were commercial models.

_____

CL • Charger Loading Lee-Enfield Magazine Rifle,† Mk. I.††

Schwing (very good): $675 (Schwing’s formula is 10 percent less than base rifle).
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $894.33 (n=3).

Coggansfield high: $1,200 (personal sale, replacement barrel, very good). May 2005.
Coggansfield low: $400 (personal sale, replacement barrel, mismatched sight and bolt, good+ [would have graded better but for replacement foreend]). Feb. 2006.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $1,141.50 (n=2)
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: -21.7 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† CLLE mk. Is come in three varieties, respectively, those converted from MLE mk. I, MLE mk. I* and MLM mk. II*. Of the three sales observed here, two were mk. I* basis and one, mk. I. Of these two subtypes, there seems no reason to suppose that one would be more sought after than the other. The other possibility, the MLM mk. II* conversion, might fetch a premium, given the scarcity of the base model. I have never encountered a CLLE mk. I converted from MLM mk. II*, though I did once see a detached receiver of what had once been such a rifle.

_____

CL • Charger Loading Lee-Enfield Magazine Rifle,† Mk. I, India Pattern.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† The CLLE mk. I, I.P. theoretically has two subtypes, distinguished from each other by the model of long Lee from which they were converted (MLE mk. I or MLE mk. I*). It is doubtful that one would fetch a premium over the other. However, this discussion can remain nothing but theoretical (a) because no sales of any mk. I I.P.s have been observed and (b) because of Ishapore’s habit of grinding former markings off converted rifles, this obscuring the model of origin anyway.

_____

CL • Charger Loading Lee-Enfield Magazine Rifle,† Mk. I*.††

Schwing (very good): $ $675 (formula is 10 percent less than base rifle).
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): $938.00 (n=10).

Coggansfield high: $2,450 (retail, all matching, fine). Nov. 2006.
Coggansfield low: $400 (retail, bought as part of package of 4 rifles, very good). Oct. 2005.

Coggansfield average, last edition: $820.83 (n=6)
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: +14.3 percent.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† CLLE mk. I* rifles have four subtypes, respectively, (a) those converted from MLE mk. I, (b) from MLE mk. I*, (c) from MLM mk. II*, and (d) those upgraded from CLLM mk. II. Of the 10 sales observed here, all bar one were either MLE mk. I or I* conversions. The other was a CLLM upgrade. No pattern of buyer preference was discerned. The other possibility, the MLM mk. II* conversion, might fetch a premium, given the scarcity of the base model, but I have seen no sale of such a rifle.

_____

CL • Charger Loading Lee-Enfield Magazine Rifle,† Mk. II, India Pattern.††

Schwing (very good): N/A.
Manowar (very good): N/A.
Coggansfield (average of all reviewed): No sales found or reviewed.

Coggansfield average, last edition: N/A.
Percentage +/-, this edition over last edition: N/A.

† For pricing purposes, subtypes not distinguished by Coggansfield.

†† The CLLE mk. II, I.P. theoretically has three subtypes: (a) MLE mk. I conversion, (b) MLE mk. I* conversion or (c) CLLE mk. I, I.P. upgrade. It is doubtful that one would fetch a premium over the others. However, this discussion can remain nothing but theoretical (a) because no sales of any mk. I I.P.s have been observed and (b) because of Ishapore’s habit of grinding former markings off converted rifles, this obscuring the model of origin anyway.
 
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