Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Diamond with Oak Clusters Bullet Member
Joined
·
23,078 Posts
Nice - I really like the old big bore top breaks.

The top one in 44 Russian appears to have a trademark stamp of a New York importer (J. Galef) of the 1920s era. The 44 Russian was a popular gun in Europe before and through WWI, especially in the Balkans region.

The Brits did buy some of the Spanish made 455 Webley top breaks during WWI - I am aware of at least 4 different manufacturer names I have seen with British proofs.
 

·
Diamond with Oak Clusters Bullet Member
Joined
·
23,078 Posts
Interesting - well, that isn't the J. Galef import logo - however it is a Model 1914 (which was used widely in WWI). I get a kick out of the "Secret Service" logos stamped on these guns - I guess that was done to make them marketable in the US. I have seen that used on all different calibers and makes of Spanish guns, seen some mis-spelled "Secret Servise".
 

·
Diamond with Oak Clusters Bullet Member
Joined
·
23,078 Posts
The crown over V proof mark all over the frame, barrel crane, cylinder chambers - is typical of the Spanish revolvers accepted into the British service. What is not typical is the caliber and ton marking stamped on it. GAC is one of the normal manufacturers of these pistols.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,729 Posts
Originally, the No. 7 revolver was built in 11 mms Spanish Ordnance, which cartridge is almost equal to the German 10,4 mm Reichsrevolver. A .44 Russian will fit into either, but has been proven to be a bit too powerful, so beware.

PS: Concerning the "44 Cal" marking on the barrel, what about the .44 S&W American, the predecessor of the .44 Russian?

Carcano
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
301 Posts
Normsutton,if you know anyone that has a collection of american riflemans from 2008. I think there was an article towards the back of the mag about revolvers marked "secret service" maybe someone else might know wich month it was and or if it refered to the 44 copies or not-d-square
 

·
Copper Bullet member
Joined
·
1,447 Posts
Bob
these are some of the marks on the 445 also there are marks all over it to small for me to take a pix right now...NORM
These stamps are British proof marks that show that this weapon was sold on the commercial UK market - if you post a good shot of the crossed sceptres we can tell you when this happened.

The .760" marking shows the length of the chamber, and '6 tons per [square sign' is the standard working pressure of the .455 Webley cartridge.

There SHOULD also be other stamps, such as Crown over BNP, or BP.

These stamps are all indicative of a service weapon sold off into the public domain by commerce enterprise - it is illegal in the UK to sell any weapon without a valid proof.

tac
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top