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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A VZ24 just sold on Gunbroker for $2,025 + $45 shipping: https://www.gunbroker.com/item/868325191




AndyB said that the Slovakian firing proofs on the receiver and bolt alone do not indicate that this rifle is part of the Slovakian contract. It is nevertheless a very strange rifle. I would have been interested but not at that price, especially with a replacement mismatched stock.




At that time (1940), Slovakia was separated from Czechoslovakia with the help of the Germans. It had been separate (but part of the Austria-Hungarian empire) before the country of Czechoslovakia was created following WWI. Because it was then a separate country, the ZB factory at PB in Slovakia could no longer use Czechoslovakian firing proof marks, so they used the Slovakian double cross marking.




I have a VZ24 bayonet with 1940 Slovakian acceptance markings on bayonet and scabbard which was an overrun from the Slovakian contract. Both s/n are Romanian , BR and CR prefix, at the beginning of the second Romanian contract. The subject rifle has no acceptance mark.



More than one of these strange rifles is known to be a US bringback from Europe in little used or unused condition. The subject rifle (s/n 68 on buttplate only) is in an N3 suffix stock, so is probably a sporter rescue in a SCW stock. There is another similar rifle with buttplate s/n 70 here:
https://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?1136121-Slovak-VZ-24-Bring-Back



I would guess the subject rifle was made in a small contract (70 known) in 1940 probably in between the Slovakian and second Romanian contracts. It would have been sold to some police or paramilitary organization in Europe, probably German (like RAD). The siderail marking is too early to have been after the second Romanian contract. I have a Romanian CR prefix rifle with CESKOSLOVENSKA on the siderail and a TR prefix without the CESKOSLOVENSKA.
 

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Informative post ! In case it's of interest, here is a side-by-side of two Slovak bolt acceptance marks:
..................... left is OP from Gunbroker and right is Povazska Bystrica HR 19545

0bolt_acceptance.jpg

EDIT: I initially thought the marks were different as between the two examples above, but now I am not sure they aren't both "merely partially struck"
..... in the image below I have superimposed them together as a single proof mark (but this may be pure fantasy! does anyone know?)

0bolt_acceptance2.jpg
 

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Doubble cross of Saints Cyril and Metod on 3 hills remains a slovakian crest to these days. Even now on flag too.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slovakia
The rifle is called by collectors a spare parts of second quality mounting, was offered for sale in war period. Here is problem the mixed early 1935 production buttstock,that was normally delivered to CS Army contract.
 

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that is a very good looking example, with good, matching condition metal. hard to believe price, but the bids offered look honest. thanks for posting that, Bill.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Informative post ! In case it's of interest, here is a side-by-side of two Slovak bolt acceptance marks:
..................... left is OP from Gunbroker and right is Povazska Bystrica HR 19545

EDIT: I initially thought the marks were different, but now I am not sure they aren't both "merely partially struck"
..... in the image below I have superimposed them together as a single proof mark (but this may be pure fantasy! does anyone know?)
You are just seeing the difficulty in stamping a flat stamp on a curved surface. The full stamp (as in your combined photo) has two crosses and three hills. Look at how poorly stamped the Slovak acceptance markings are on my bayonet and scabbard photos - and those are flat surfaces.

The acceptance stamp is E1(emblem)40. You can also see the circle CM Romanian stamp on the scabbard.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Doubble cross of Saints Cyril and Metod on 3 hills remains a slovakian crest to these days. Even now on flag too.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slovakia
The rifle is called by collectors a spare parts of second quality mounting, was offered for sale in war period. Here is problem the mixed early 1935 production buttstock,that was normally delivered to CS Army contract.

Andy, thanks for posting the wikipedia link. Very interesting history.

In case you are not familiar with the term, a "sporter rescue" is a rifle on which the stock has had the front portion cut off and the handguard removed (to make a sporting rifle). Then a different stock and handguard is used to bring it back to original configuration. In this case, a 1935 stock from the Spanish Civil War (SCW) was used, indicating that the new stock was put on the rifle in the US.

Sporter Rescue: I have a self-matching 1939 u block Orberndorf (42) K98k rifle on which I replaced the cut down stock and missing handguard. I was lucky to find a self-matching 1938 u block Orberndorf (42) stock for it. The difference in the two stocks is that the 1938 stock has one more WaA marking on it.
 

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There are a couple of references in Jan Šmíd's book. He mentions that in early 1941, the PB factory became interested in using factory-second parts, that is, parts that did not pass inspection but are fully functional, to build into about 2,000 vz.24 rifles. The intended market was for non-military guards in essential industries, what the Germans called "Werkschutz". Another reference mentions that, in November 1941, there was a possibility of a contract from the Bulgarian Police Directorate for 10,000 vz.24 rifles. This did not come to pass, but they did get permission from the Germans to make the rifles. In the end, the Germans took them over. However, they did not take 5,000 that did not fully meet standards. So, the PB factory made another 5,000 for the Germans (so they can have their 10,000). They were delivered in February & May 1942. The 5,000 the Germans did not take were set for "export" by the company. Total: 15,000 in 1942. Can't tell whether the 2,000 mentioned in the first reference is in addition to the 15,000.

The OP linked rifle has "Československa" on the side rail, so the receiver was a leftover or reject from an earlier production.
 

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There are a couple of references in Jan Šmíd's book. He mentions that in early 1941, the PB factory became interested in using factory-second parts, that is, parts that did not pass inspection but are fully functional, to build into about 2,000 vz.24 rifles. The intended market was for non-military guards in essential industries, what the Germans called "Werkschutz". Another reference mentions that, in November 1941, there was a possibility of a contract from the Bulgarian Police Directorate for 10,000 vz.24 rifles. This did not come to pass, but they did get permission from the Germans to make the rifles. In the end, the Germans took them over. However, they did not take 5,000 that did not fully meet standards. So, the PB factory made another 5,000 for the Germans (so they can have their 10,000). They were delivered in February & May 1942. The 5,000 the Germans did not take were set for "export" by the company. Total: 15,000 in 1942. Can't tell whether the 2,000 mentioned in the first reference is in addition to the 15,000.

The OP linked rifle has "Československa" on the side rail, so the receiver was from an earlier production.

Thanks, that's very good info.
 
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