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That's standard MO in the US army. Locate the enemy tanks, withdraw, take cover, fire for effect.
 
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That's standard MO in the US army. Locate the enemy tanks, withdraw, take cover, fire for effect.
But with 19th century cannons
The last Russo-Turkish War (1877–78) was also the most important one. In 1877 Russia and its ally Serbia came to the aid of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Bulgaria in their rebellions against Turkish rule.
I assume they were using black powder, but no details on what was used.
 

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Its not unusual.........of limited effect, but when the Wolfs in the door, anything that makes a man bleed will do just fine.
France in WW1, Finland in the Winter war, etc, etc..
 

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Well, why not?
If the guns were in storage maybe the ammo was as well.
Desperate times, desperate measures............
I think the 28cm Krupp cannon (mounted in Oskarsburg Fortress) that helped destroy SMS Blucher were of late 19th century origin.
 

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The Russians were desperate at that stage of the war. Anything that still worked was put into use. They had shortages or everything. The German advances overran entire army groups and their equipment too. I remember Russian soldiers being handed a couple of clips of 7.62x54r ammo and told to pick up the rifle from a dead comrade as they advanced. But in that battle the Russians were facing mostly light tanks with more thin armor. So even old muzzle loading cannons would have worked.
 

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Clyde reference the 28CM cannons, my Father told me once that Norwegian "Quislings" had stolen the sights, but due to the range the Norwegians just looked down the barrel thru the open breech until the ship was insight, loaded the gun and fired, seemed to work out OK, at least for the Norwegians. John
Well, that's just one of those stories. The Krupp guns windage and elevation was set by the use of rangefinders and such. At time the Blucher arrived, the fortress had a large group of fresh recruits, so they only had trained personell enough to man two of the guns. And only time for one shot each. The torpedobattery (wich the germans didn't know about) was buildt in the 1898 - 1901 timeframe, with the torpedoes delivered in 1900. 40 years later they worked flawlessly.

 

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Well, that's just one of those stories. The Krupp guns windage and elevation was set by the use of rangefinders and such. At time the Blucher arrived, the fortress had a large group of fresh recruits, so they only had trained personell enough to man two of the guns. And only time for one shot each. The torpedobattery (wich the germans didn't know about) was buildt in the 1898 - 1901 timeframe, with the torpedoes delivered in 1900. 40 years later they worked flawlessly.

The Norse had a battery if 15cm (5.9") guns covering the channel by the Oskarsburg as well as the big guns. Apparently opened fire and did considerable (damage Iin addition to the torpedoes and the big Krupp guns). I understand the torpedoes were launched down a channel and "swam" out. Bluecher, like the other Hipper-class CAs were considerably heavier than advertised (around 15K tons instead of 10K standard), but rather lightly protected. Main belt, for example 70-80mm max.
 

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No details on exactly what the cannons were except that were from a Russian Turkish war. But a large cannon from a hardened position if sighted in would certainly be noticed by someone in the tanks for sure.
During the Winter War, limited amount of Finnish troops used Berdan rifles from the 1870s. They also used several Imperial Russian and French cannons from the 1870s during the Continuation War until 1944. Single 229 mm mortar m/1877 was used in the Svir Front, pictured below (SA-Kuva 121487).

 
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