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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wanted to showcase a rifle I’ve had for a few months, and can’t wait to take to the range. I found this Asiatic beauty in a Arizona gun store for $250, a steal by my standards. This rifle was manufactured in 1967 at the Ishapore Arsenal in Ishapur India. It’s chambered in 7.62x51 NATO, with a 12 round detachable magazine. This gun is 90% parts matching with everything but the front sights matching. There is one screw missing, on the front sights as well. The Rifle was in pretty good condition when I found it, and I gave it a thorough cleaning to make it shine. Like many of its type, there is a hairline fracture in the top portion of the wooden handguard. The bore is in surprisingly good condition despite the Corrosive ammo this rifle most likely used while in the hands of the Indian army. I hope to obtain an Ishapore Lee-Enfield MK.III SMLE at some point, but I’m super happy to have this rifle for now.
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I'm guessing you mean the nosecap is mismatched (as opposed to the front sight itself)?

It's missing a sling swivel & rear sight protector, does the stock forearm match?

It's a very clean example!

Welcome aboard!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm guessing you mean the nosecap is mismatched (as opposed to the front sight itself)?

It's missing a sling swivel & rear sight protector, does the stock forearm match?

It's a very clean example!

Welcome aboard!
That is correct, the nose cap is mismatched. What did the rear sight protector look like? The stock forearm does match. Thank you for the welcome as well!!
 

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The 2A1 rifles were reportedly primarily intended for use by Indian Police Departments, where the 800 yard limit on the rear sights would be less of a hindrance.

It is actually quite common to see Indian Police to be carrying rifles as they discharge their duties.
 

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Nice find. Neat to see - a blast from the past... I got one WAAAAY back in the day paid maybe $70? or $100? Cant remember. Shot the stuffings out of it with cheap surplus. (Many thousands of rounds). Built like a brick wall. Could drop it off a cliff or run over with the Dodge and couldnt care less. Carried it on hikes in Montana bear country in case one felt like snuggling up for a hug. LOTSA fun. Enjoy.
 

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That is correct, the nose cap is mismatched. What did the rear sight protector look like? The stock forearm does match. Thank you for the welcome as well!!
Nice stock!!!

Here is what my sight protector looks like:



Also, the 2A1 nose cap sight protector is squared off when compared to the standard Lee Enfield:


The sling swivel is flat:


Most of the parts you want can be found at LIBERTY TREE COLLECTORS. The sling swivels there might be round instead of flat.

Bob
 
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That is correct, the nose cap is mismatched. What did the rear sight protector look like? The stock forearm does match. Thank you for the welcome as well!!
The sling swivel should be the stamped flat type the same as on the buttstock.
The rear sight protector would be the "straight" type. Lacking the offset or dogleg as commonly seen on the SMLE.
Since that is missing, you may also need the counter sink flat head screw, the cap but with slot, and its washer. In other words the entire assembly.
Is there an empty hole on the underside of the forend? The washer may still be stuck in there.
The nosecap should be the "squared or square eared" type and one without provision for mounting a forward piling swivel.

As mentioned, these rifles served mostly with police or para military police and militia units. Originally conceived as a stopgap measure while the 1A1 rifle was being issued to front line forces. Having 303 and 7.62 NATO both in the supply lines would have been a logistical nightmare. As supply caught up with demand, the 2A rifles filtered back to the rear and finally down to the 'Federales' at the more local levels.

The rifles represent trying times during India's more immediate post independence era. Partitioning, border wars, civil unrest etc.

>> Bob's post wasn't showing on my end until after I posted. But at least we said the same things.
And you got a link to a source!
 

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The rifle has been cleaned up nicely, wood likely refinished and perhaps some cold blue added. I have no issue with that since most of these rifles arrived here in the USA with much neglect due to poor storage. Once cleaned up, a few did turn out as nice as yours, often not the case though as the putrid cosmolene the Indians used dissolved the paint finish on metal and made the wood spongy and soft.

There are those who'd prefer your rifle as it came out of the crate, a filthy mass of goooo but personally , I prefer the condition your rifle is in ...which is a nice example to own. Others will arrive and vote for 'original residue" condition. LOL.
 

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ATF classified all of these as Curios a few years ago. They all now pass the 50 year test, so it's a moot point. Nice rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The rifle has been cleaned up nicely, wood likely refinished and perhaps some cold blue added. I have no issue with that since most of these rifles arrived here in the USA with much neglect due to poor storage. Once cleaned up, a few did turn out as nice as yours, often not the case though as the putrid cosmolene the Indians used dissolved the paint finish on metal and made the wood spongy and soft.

There are those who'd prefer your rifle as it came out of the crate, a filthy mass of goooo but personally , I prefer the condition your rifle is in ...which is a nice example to own. Others will arrive and vote for 'original residue" condition. LOL.
That is part of the reason I hopped onto it so quickly, it was in the best shape I had seen for 2A1, and from giving it a quick inspection, I knew it would clean up nice. Not bad for the $250 price tag. My ultimate question now, is what 7.62x51 NATO ammo out there should I get to feed this rifle? I'm wanting to avoid Corrosive as much as possible, but also use cooler rounds.
 

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I would stay away from Magtech 7.62x51. Sorry, that’s the only info I can give you since I hand load for mine after replacing the broken bolt.
 

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That is part of the reason I hopped onto it so quickly, it was in the best shape I had seen for 2A1, and from giving it a quick inspection, I knew it would clean up nice. Not bad for the $250 price tag. My ultimate question now, is what 7.62x51 NATO ammo out there should I get to feed this rifle? I'm wanting to avoid Corrosive as much as possible, but also use cooler rounds.
You should only use the original NATO 144g-150g, none of the hot-stuff, no sniper variants, just bog-standard NATO as issued in the 70's.

When manufactured the 2A and 2A1 failed to pass the proof tests as they were manufactured from a lower grade steel (despite the internet rumours that they used a superior grade steel) and the action warped and locked up - this was with 'standard' NATO issue ammunition. 1000's of rifles had to be scrapped.
Ishapore then reverted back to using the steel specified by the British for the No1 Mk3 and it 'squeaked' past the proofing tests, BUT anything hotter or heavier than it was originally designed for can / will give stress problems and twisted actions.

Source of the above information is the Proofmaster from the Ishapore Rifle factory.
(I have previously ( a number of times) posted the full article published by the proofmaster).
 

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I actually shoot mine regularly with steel case 145 grn .308 wolf. Everyone always points out the Russians load their steel ammo “light” so I’ve found it to be great ammo to use. I’m sure lots of people are going to post “don’t shoot it with .308 ever”, but I’ve shot mine for many years and probably over 1000 rounds and the headspace is still in spec with a field gage and I’ve never had a sticky bolt/extraction from it. I wouldn’t shoot it with heavier grain hunting .308 though or with bubba handloads.

Either way, it’s probably in my top 3 for favorite rifles to shoot.
 

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Quick question: Is Indian 7.62 NATO downloaded slightly in light of this?

Sent from my SM-T820 using Tapatalk
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Does anyone know what the Indians used? I heard, most likely incorrectly, that the Indians used West German 7.62x51 NATO?
 

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Your rifle was a good buy for the condition. I have a '65 & a '67 that I'm fond of. PAX
 
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