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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Chinese 'Ghost Gun' (SKS Paratrooper) - very early year – 1st year of Chinese production (mid-to latter part of 1956). It is referred to as the ‘Ghost Gun’, and the Chinese called it the ‘type 56 and a half carbine’. These guns are described in the guide ‘Dating the Chinese SKS’ at Dating The Chinese SKS. I would think that they may be more collectible than the run-of-the-mill SKS. So, what do you think is a good price if I decide to sell it?
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Since this rifle was originally made in 1956, it was not made for export, but it could have been shortened when it was exported. I purchased the rifle back in the 1990's when SKS's first started appearing here in the USA (very early). However, it does not look like it was modified. The term 'type 56 and a half' came from the article that I referenced and I do not know the author's sources for the info, nor do I know how knowledgable the author actually is.

Thanks for the input everyone, and maybe someone can provide additional info or more up to date info than appears in the article.
 

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I have heard the "fifty-six and a half rifle" moniker before. Probably from the same link written by runningman, or possibly in a thread where it came up in the course of discussion. Or both. If runningman said it, he likely has a reliable source.

You are likely correct that the barrel was shortened pre-import-- though a homespun DIY is not entirely out of the realm of possibility. Does the rifle retain all of it's original, serial matching parts (all stamped in the same font)?

The info you have on your "Ghost Rifle" (aka Non-arsenal stamped) carbine, is the most up to date info currently known.

Post some photos when you can!
 

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Cut down to paratrooper length is popular regardless that paratrooper , as has been said already, was never a chinese issue miitary length gun. Yes, many original military SKS were later cut down, restocked ( often unnumbered) and sold to a welcoming american buyer. The paratrooper being shorter is eaiser to maniupulate especially from a pick up or in dense forests while hunting...
I don't think the so called ghost gun later conversion to a paratrooper is more valuable because of the original issue. It is more valuable as any sks cut down to paratrooper length is popular and often sells for more. Collectors on the other hand, often will pay less for a cut down sks to paratrooper.
 

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yeeeeeeeah, I too also have a "cowboy companion", cut down SKS, in the 7million SN range, that has a screwed in barrel, milled trigger housing and a Cyrillic marked rear sight. and whatever collectible status it may have had, is gone, gone, gone and gone, just like yours

I would agree with martin on the value..........6-800 bucks
 

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"type 56 and a half carbine" is bad, bad translation. Stop using it.

Many old Chinese military SKS were refurbished, and exported to the U.S.A. and other markets. Some of those SKS had barrel shortened in the process.

Even if the SKS is the first year, first month or the first day production, its collector value is lost.
 

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It’s considered a commercial SKS at this point since the barrel was shortened. They’re very popular with the general shooting community. Does it have a shortened blade bayonet? Those are scarcer than the shortened spike bayonets.
Since you mentioned it, is there even a shortened blade type SKS with a short blade? Have you seen one?
 

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Are you sure about that? In the source link there is no suggesion that iis a "translation" at all, but merely how the rifle is commonly referred to in China.
I don't know your source link. What I know is this. If a Chinese word "rifle" (步槍) translated into "walking spear", it is a bad, bad translation. The same is with the "type 56 and a half carbine". The original Chinese is 五六半. The translation "type 56 and a half carbine" is silly.
 

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I don't know your source link. What I know is this. If a Chinese word "rifle" (步槍) translated into "walking spear", it is a bad, bad translation. The same is with the "type 56 and a half carbine". The original Chinese is 五六半. The translation "type 56 and a half carbine" is silly.
The source link in the OP-- it's the link that leads to the source the OP refers to.

That source link was written by runningman.

It is never referred to by running man as a translation, merely how it is commonly referred to in the country of origin.

Do you not read links when they are part of the OP. Do you know who runningman is?
 

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IIRC, the discussions I've seen about the "56½" moniker it was suggested it may have to do with the Type56 (sks) production starting in the middle of 1956.

I think the suggestion was also made that "56½" may have possibly been used in China to differentiate between the Type56 SKS and the Type56 AK-- because they both bear the exact same 3-character designation -- 五六式 .

Such a differentiation is meaningless here in the US because the 五六式 AK isn't something that American collectors have access to.
 

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The correct translation of 五六半 is "56 Semi". That's what it is. Only a machine translation tells you "56 and a half".
It's NOT a translation if the only group of people calling it the "56½" Rifle are speaking Chinese.

Perhaps refer to and read the "source link" in the OP. Maybe that's the only way for you to understand that "56½" is NOT a translation.

The exact citation from runningman's writeup:
The Chinese themselves often refer to their domestic built SKS carbine as the “Type 56 and a half” carbine.

 
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