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Just received it. Bought off the bay. It's a very rare and interesting piece. Unfortunately it's de-militarized. But I had never seen such a receiver cover in person or for sale since I started collecting Russian SKS.

I would have missed it and thought it's fake, if I had not seen two other examples online.

It is not covered by typical refurb BBQ paint. I did use a bit chalk powders to show the interesting markings.

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Discussion Starter #3
Besides this one, so far I have seen only one example in Canada and one de-militarized and center cut example in Russia.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I felt it's much more rare than the correct 1949 Russian SKS spike bayonet.
 

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Just noticed. This one has the У Ч (English translation u, ch) mark on the bottom of the rear cover. This is the indicator of a training rifle for the Mosin Nagant.
 

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those marks are found on ak parts as well I do not think it means for Mosin Nagant training just training.
 

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well, it'll make a nice paperweight.......other then that I don't know what else you can use it for
 

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I have early 1945 SKS drawings, and from what I see the design is almost similar to the serial 1949 SKS carbines (except bayonet). In 1945-1948 small batches were produced for trials.
1948 and even 1946 carbines pop up few times,

1946 cabine (training gun,refurbished, deactivated)

3754043


3754046

3754047

3754048

3754049

3754050


1948 cabine (training gun,refurbished, deactivated)
3754051

3754052

3754053

3754054
 

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A really great find!

With that two letter prefix and a number in the 4000s it suggests they made more than a few in 1948.
 

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A really great find!

With that two letter prefix and a number in the 4000s it suggests they made more than a few in 1948.

It may sound unusual, but in the case of Russian firearms stamped/engraved date does not always correspond with real acceptance/issue date, and serial number was stamped just before the acceptance - on the assembled and tested gun. Not depending on the stamped date, the firearm will be recorded as "produced" in month and year when it was actually accepted by military acceptance.

For example, in case of the SKS factory logo and year are under the bluing, which indicates that they were stamped/engraved on the unfinished part. While the serial number was stamped over the bluing - on the complete gun.

Serial number ЛА4440 more looks like a number for the serial gun.

1946 and 1948 carbines that I showed are from trial batches for sure - their numbers started from 2Б and 2B, which are codes for trials configuration. Similar approach was used in 1930's on trial stable rifles (so called "Simonov" trial rifles) - their modifications were coded 1B, 2B, 3B and others
 

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Given the "У Ч " and "CKC-45" designations, the cuts in the covers suggest that they may have came from classroom rifles-- possibly parts of complete carbines purposely cut-away for teaching purposes.

Like this one:
3754422
 

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I checked some records, 1948 order for trial batch was 1700 carbines

Given the "У Ч " and "CKC-45" designations, the cuts in the covers suggest that they may have came from classroom rifles-- possibly parts of complete carbines purposely cut-away for teaching purposes.
Like this one:
Сut in the cover is not connected with УЧ marking. It was made during deactivation in 2008, deactivation was made by depot in Nizhyn, Ukraine. УЧ marking was applied much earlier, it can be even factory marking
 

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The cuts in the two covers wouldn't render an sks inoperable.

The rifles might not be ideal for the shooter using them, but the cuts are not deactivating cuts and would not prevent any rifle from functioning.
 

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It is also impossible to say if these particular 1948 covers were ever in Ukraine.
pcke2000's cover and the first one depicted in Ratnik's post were at Balakleya, Ukraine as indicated by the Arsenal No. 1 ("diver down") marking.

I would guess if Ratnik says the deactivation was done at Nizhyn, Ukraine, he has good evidence for that.
 

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Yep. I forgot about the Ukraine refurb mark.

However, these cuts are not deactivating cuts, and would not prevent any rifle from functioning.
 
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