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Discussion Starter #1
Not sure if I ever mentioned this before or not but I have a, I believe, 1944 dated Springfield Armory M1 Garand, serial #2,213,XXX with a S-A 9-41 dated barrel. How would a 1944 rifle get a 1941 dated barrel?
BARQS19
 

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Because at some later date the barrel was replaced with one salvaged from a rifle of earlier MFR.
 

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I agree with blood on this one. This almost makes me suspect this may have been a field repaired rifle at one of those mobile ordnance facilities the USA operated just behind the lines in Europe. Truthfully, there would be no way, that I am aware of, to prove or disprove that thought.
 

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Or, it could have been removed from a surveyed receiver at an arsenal. "Parts is parts" was their philosophy. I've seen many late M1903s with very early barrels.
 

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Spare barrels

It's not necessarily a salvaged barrel. Manufacturers were required to make a specific number of spare parts. These spare parts were shipped to whevever they were needed including to repair arsenals. The barrel could very well have been a spare barrel that could have been installed at any arsenal at any time during a rebuild of the rifle or simply installed at the field level. As Rick mentioned, "parts is parts." And as Michael said, there really is no way to tell for sure.
 

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Your 1941 Springfield Armory barrel may have indeed been assembled to your 1944 Springfield Armory receiver in 1944. Quoting Bob Seijas in an article on Springfield Armory production published in the Winter 1995 issue of the Garand Collectors Association Newsletter, he writes "Another fact that must be remembered is that SA set aside a "contingency reserve" of almost every part, so that an interuption of any kind in one phase would not shut down the whole line"......."One can easily visualize, then, a set aside of a thousand receivers or barrels getting more and more out of sequence as they sit there in reserve, until they are eventually used, either for there intended purpose or as "clean-up run" at the end". As Harington & Richardson was completing their production of M1 rifles, some of these late H&R M1s will be found with early dated H&R barrels. I believe these were barrels being held in reserve and now served no purpose except to assemble them to receivers.
 

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The other thing to check is the crown on the muzzle, from what I have read, in the 50's when Garands were not common, several commercial firms took shot out barrels, drilled them out and relined them with turned down '03 barrels, and then re-crowned them.

The shape of the crown is definitely different than straight USGI barrels, a buddy of mine and I just found this on one he had purchased...

The USGI crown should look something like this from the side /------\

While the re-crowned ones look like this \______/

kind of crude, but hopefully you get my drift....if its re-crowned, who knows, if not...then I agree with the above comments....
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks all for your replies, very interesting. I had a thought that maybe these were reserve barrels set aside but wasn't sure.
thanks,
BARQS19
 

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To Rick the Librarian2

I was suggesting 1941 barrels were being held in reserve until needed, in this case until 1944 when it was assembled to the 1944 receiver.
 
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