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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I picked this up today and have a few questions. What is the MB stamp near the right rear of the frame by the hammer pin? Some of the stamps seem light, especially the ordnance stamp and the GHD stamp. Is that normal? Are the grips original? Any other insights are appreciated. The story is that it’s a bring back...yeah, I know. Any chance it’s original and not a mixmaster? Barrel stamped HS. Also, what’s the best way to get rid of the oxidation? It’s not like normal rust. Thanks!
 

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The light stamping is pretty normal but your gun has been refinished after bead blasting. The right grip is made by Keyes Fiber Company and was used on Remington Rand and Ithaca and others. The right side is made by colt. The frame was made in 1943. Should be a nice shooter. Thank you for sharing. Try to post pics in natural light if possible.
John
 

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It is a rebuild gun. Decent gun. Is a recent CMP?

Rule of thumb, if the grips screws resist, apply Kroil Oil and let it set, then try again. Getting the grip bushings loose is not a plus and should be avoided.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
1911

It is a rebuild gun. Decent gun. Is a recent CMP?

Rule of thumb, if the grips screws resist, apply Kroil Oil and let it set, then try again. Getting the grip bushings loose is not a plus and should be avoided.
No, it’s not a CMP Pistol, it’s a local purchase. I’ll work on those bushings.

Any idea what the MB stamp is?
 

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I believe it is the rebuild mark for Letterkenny Army Depot but I have not seen another example on a 1911A1.
John
 

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Neat! I like military weapons with lots of stamps, but thats just me. MB is a stamp for Magna-Flux (Magnetic Particle Resonance Imaging: kinda of like an Xray in that it is an inspection process for detecting cracks/flaws.) It is currently my speculation (and opinion-nothing more since I have no documentation to back it up) that these MB stamps (of which there are several variations such as 'MB', 'M+B', 'M-B' etc) date from about the 1970s/1980s: I say this because the technology was possibly applied around that time when some of the 'soft-slides' started breaking after decades of use and DOD ordered them inspected. If they pass, they get the stamp. If not, perhaps they install a hard-slide. After the mid 1980s Uncle Sam likely doesnt put much more money into 1911 maintenance and its use ceases since most pistols are put into storage.
In recent years, I personally never observed any type of small arm have an "MB" type stamp after it was worked on by various echelons of maintenance. I was aware that MPI inspections were conducted, however, but nothing ever came back with a stamp. For example, just before Christmas Exodus holiday in 2015 I saw a 1911 completely stripped (even the mag release button assembly) and I asked the armorer whats up; he replied it was prepped for 'gauging and inspection'. It was a WW1 era 1911 with a 97,xxx frame so perhaps someone thought it best to check the old warhorse out just before the upcoming deployment. After all, it was over 100 years old...
Anyway, after Christmas I asked about it and he said, 'the pistol passed all checks'. That is impressive to me. Finally, the only other indication I have personally observed of the work done on a weapon is its return hang tag (if it even has one). At times it will list a summary of work completed. These tags came from one section's 1911s that had just returned from work being done at Ft Bragg and they were getting their weapons prepped and inspected prior to deployment. (For an example of a pistol that returned with a red hangtag, see posts in the CMP thread under Military pistols, ie Rack # 45 appropriately enough named)
 

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Nice shooter grade gun. Assuming the barrel is good; $600-$800 in my area at a local show. Not sure for other parts of the country or Gunbroker.
John
 

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Thats the $64,000 question: for standard collector sensibilities, it does not have monetary value worth much beyond or equal to a NIB mfg pistol. (And note that I challenge anyone to define 'collector' and 'collectible'...hint; they are undefined and undefinable). No one can explain/convince/cajole/compel others to agree to something but 'collective wisdom' of a large body of people is another convention altogether. So, if are thinking you can convince the 'crowd' its worth X (say, $1500) when the they say its Y (say, $800) then you are likely outta luck.
Now fast forward 100 years...I will bet you any and all USGI 1911s will be defined by the crowds conventional wisdom as a 'collectible' and they will think our generation silly for taking good artifacts out as 'shooters' when they (and we in our times) knew all along we could have just as easily bought an Auto-Ordnance for cheap and preserved some history. How and why do I say this? In a word, history and social psychology. Remember all the 'cheap' or junk surplus from the 1950s to 1990s? Now, many and any are being snapped up for values that often far exceeds their prior valued worth. Why is that? As much simple supply and demand; economics 101. Want another example? Look at the crazy prices 1911s go for online; no rhyme or logical reason, its just what it is.
To me? I think its current value equal to any of the CMP releases; so, make it a Service grade equal to $1050. Hey, its no better and definitely not worse than anything seen posted in the CMP forum. Your not going to convince any 'collectors' of that, to be sure. And you dont need to. No one need argue about these things, just friendly debate. Put it online and watch it go silly. Or maybe not. Just my opinion.
 

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Thats the $64,000 question: for standard collector sensibilities, it does not have monetary value worth much beyond or equal to a NIB mfg pistol. (And note that I challenge anyone to define 'collector' and 'collectible'...hint; they are undefined and undefinable). No one can explain/convince/cajole/compel others to agree to something but 'collective wisdom' of a large body of people is another convention altogether. But, if are thinking you can convince the 'crowd' its worth X (say, $1500) when the they say its Y (say, $800) then you are likely outta luck.
Now fast forward 100 years...I will bet you any and all USGI 1911 will be defined by the crowd and conventional wisdom as a 'collectible' and they will think our generation silly for taking good artifacts out as 'shooters' when they and we all knew we could have just as easily bought an Auto-Ordnance for cheap and preserved some history. How and why do I say this? In a word, history and social psychology. Remember all the 'cheap' or junk surplus from the 1950s to 1990s? Now, many and any are being snapped up for values that often far exceeds their prior valued worth. Why is that? As much simple supply and demand; economics 101. Want another example? Look at the crazy prices 1911s go for online; no rhyme or logical reason, its just what it is.
To me? I think its current value equal to any of the CMP releases; so, make it a Service grade equal to $1050. Hey, its no better and definitely not worse than anything seen posted in the CMP forum. Your not going to convince any 'collectors' of that, to be sure. And you dont need to. No one need argue about these things, just friendly debate. Put it online and watch it go silly. Or maybe not. Just my opinion.
agreed,

a true collector will collect rebuilds too, which is what you have

I also think you have a $1K gun, maybe a few dollars more
 

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agreed,

a true collector will collect rebuilds too, which is what you have

I also think you have a $1K gun, maybe a few dollars more
I agree with both of you. I bet it will bring $1k easily, probably more, at any show I regularly attend. It may seem silly but that is the market I know.
 

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the days of finding and buying USGI M1911s for under 1K are long, long gone, they now go for more then 1K just for shooters. I found a ITHACA M1911A1 at a gun show for 400 bucks back in 1995, in nice condition rebuilt by ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL, which was the average price for one then.


 

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The frame was made in 1943.

actually, migrapilot is correct on the year, 1944. the frame was made in 1944, that serial number falls in the COLT range. the COLT slide was probably unserviceable so they replaced it with a REMINGTON RAND slide at the depo, or it got mixed up at the depo. which is common to find different slides on different manufacturer frames, that the beauty of interchangeable parts you can take one manufacture part and it will fit on another manufacture
 
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