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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No FTR marks, but a replacement bolt fitted and serialed with a G not a C. Unmolested example, not torn down and “cleaned up”. That sickens me. Washing away history IMO. Import marked on the underside of the muzzle. Note the screw stake marks at the magazine screw. It’s been taken down in a previous life. The N79 is a British top wood maker. Not typical on a 1942 Savage.
 

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That's a high wood forend, so is it original? (I thought Savage and LB used low wood through late 42/early 43) .

And is that the scalloped pattern of beech?

Automotive tire Gas Bumper Wood Automotive exterior


Not sure if I got the wood type correct, but this is what I'm thinking of

Wood Bicycle part Composite material Metal Wood stain
 

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The N79 is a British top wood maker.
It looks to me as if the forend is original savage but the bands are British

N79 = Viners Ltd (Sheffield)
N78 = Victor Engineering & Sheet Metal Workers (Manchester)

It almost looks as if has been close to a fire - particularly the handguard which seems to have 'bubbled varnish' on it.

It has certainly been "ridden hard and put away wet"
 

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It looks to me as if the forend is original savage but the bands are British
What makes you think the forend is original? I’m not challenging , I’m really curious , because I agonized over a correct forend on my 2c serial Savage project. I had a thread on that.

Here I’m seeing high wood and what looks like a multi character manufacturers mark at the wrist. It’s unreadable , but it’s not the single character squared S of a savage stock. That’s why I don’t think it’s original . The wood itself, I can’t tell what it is , but I would expect walnut for early rifles , then birch.
 

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What makes you think the forend is original?
Just going by the 'square S' in the box on the handguard 'Cap'

The metal cap 'nailed' to the handguard is (normally) supplied by the furniture manufacturer - I may be wrong but have not seen any No4 wood without the 'cap" This cap is marked by Savage and this I believe makes it a Savage forend.

In the detailed parts list for the No4 there is no individual part number for the 'cap' it comes with the handguard as a 'manufacturer assembly'. (ASSD)
Armourers / stores could not order this part as it had no part number.


Font Material property Pattern Parallel Monochrome



Item 12 (the handguard) is shown as a manufacturers assemby and incorporates item 13 and 14 ( Cap & Liner)

Font Line Parallel Line art Drawing




Bumper Rectangle Automotive exterior Cylinder Tints and shades
 

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What makes you think the forend is original? I’m not challenging , I’m really curious , because I agonized over a correct forend on my 2c serial Savage project. I had a thread on that.

Here I’m seeing high wood and what looks like a multi character manufacturers mark at the wrist. It’s unreadable , but it’s not the single character squared S of a savage stock. That’s why I don’t think it’s original . The wood itself, I can’t tell what it is , but I would expect walnut for early rifles , then birch.
Waw:

For comparison purposes would you like to see a couple of less than great photos of a Savage No. 4 Mk 1 that remains in its original as-manufactured and as issued condition?

About fifteen years ago I purchased a very nice early Savage and I remember taking good, well lit photos. But, having just searched, I can't find them. :mad:

The only photos I did find were the quick shots I took immediately upon coming home from the gun show. My practice has always been to document my gun show finds and these photos were taken inside with a flash just to help me remember the day. Simple full length shots of the four rifles I purchased without any closeups of markings or small details. The images of the Savage stock and forearm are good, but not great.

I'll be glad to post them if you feel it would assist you in resolving your questions. Please post if you want to see the photos.
 
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I'm sure limpetmine is watching this with amusement...


That's the lower (front) handguard, not the forend, in the pic.
You are absolutely correct - my mistake. I'm talkilng Savage handguard - the rest of the world is discussing the forend.

I blame 'Man-Flu' and all the meds - brain not working correctly.
 

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Waw:

For comparison purposes would you like to see a couple of less than great photos of a Savage No. 4 Mk 1 that remains in its original as-manufactured and as issued condition?

About fifteen years ago I purchased a very nice early Savage and I remember taking good, well lit photos. But, having just searched, I can't find them. :mad:

The only photos I did find were the quick shots I took immediately upon coming home from the gun show. My practice has always been to document my gun show finds and these photos were taken inside with a flash just to help me remember the day. Simple full length shots of the four rifles I purchased without any closeups of markings or small details. The images of the Savage stock and forearm are good, but not great.

I'll be glad to post them if you feel it would assist you in resolving your questions. Please post if you want to see the photos.
Sure. I had a related thread on that actually, as I was putting my early Savage (2C... serial) back together. Also, I totally get that this is in the "Who gives a... this is trivial" category.




The high wood is really the only feature that makes me think the forend is not original. I would expect something like this:

Air gun Trigger Wood Shotgun Gun barrel
 

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I always get embarrassed when I post low resolution, poorly lit photos, so I'll apologize ahead of time. Here are the four rifles I got at a show circa 2004, back when nice things could be easily found. The Mosins and the Savage were all in the $125 to $175 range. You new guys don't want to know what I paid for the last piece. 😉





 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have another, early, 1942 No. 4 Mk 1, but unfortunately the previous owner felt the need to strip it down to it's lowest part, and "freshen" it. Nasty. I feel nasty that I bought it. Patina is history.,

I'll post pics of it later tonight.
 

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I have another, early, 1942 No. 4 Mk 1, but unfortunately the previous owner felt the need to strip it down to it's lowest part, and "freshen" it. Nasty. I feel nasty that I bought it. Patina is history.,

I'll post pics of it later tonight.
Big +1

And sorry that a fool got his hands on that rifle before you did.
 

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Sorry to disagree with you Alan, but the No.4 Mk.1 rifle fore-end, end cap and pins were available as individual replacement items as shown here in Australian Military Forces Identification List 1945.
You have shown the parts list shown on page 30 of the document. However Plate J also shows discrete parts and they are listed on page 31. (Yes, I know the OP was talking about the hand guard).

It is possible, therefore, that a dinged or gouged cap on an otherwise undamaged fore-end could be replaced at FTR with new parts from a different manufacturer to that applied by the original rifle fore-end manufacturer.

Parts 30, 31 and 32

Line Tool Font Auto part Parallel


Shown here in the parts list on page 31.
30 STOCK, fore-end, Assd. Vocab number 8632
31 CAP. Vocab number 8573
32 PIN. Vocab number 8594

Font Parallel Number Pattern Monochrome


Cheers
 
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