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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't actively search for Enfields much, I usually try and focus on other rifles, but one that I've always had an eye for was a 1941 Maltby with the receiver stampings like this. It may be my inability to spot one, but they sure seem to be hard to find. This one I picked up a few weeks ago, all matching serials (mag is not serialed), and with really eye-catching wood.

When was this style of receiver stampings was used?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
AND a particularly beautiful example!!

Congratulations...worth the wait!!!
I've only seen one other in hand, and it was at a local pawn shop. They had $1,100 on it, and weren't negotiable. It too was numbers matching and in decent shape, but the wood wasn't nearly as nice on it. I'm not sure what the normal fair market value is on these nowadays, but I thought for sure it would sit for a good while at that price allowing me to call back and negotiate...but it sold the next day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Kchapmansc: That's a real beauty! Curious about your barrel- is it a 5 groove type? My '41 Maltby is 5 groove while my '42 (both original barrels) is 2- groove. Here's a shot of the left side of the '42 with markings now reduced to a few stamps but still fairly neat and with the Maltby identifier moved to the left cheek. The details of the milling have changed quite a bit from '41.

Ruprecht
Thank you, Ruprecht. Mine is a 2-groove, a detail I should've put in the first post. When looking up info on these a while back, I saw where there was a mix of 2 and 5 grooved barrels, but the majority seemed to be 2, iirc. I haven't taken the stock off, and since I don't see any need to given that there's not a hint of rust or corrosion anywhere, I don't plan on it. I wouldn't mind having a peek at the stamps on the barrel and receiver, but I'll live with the mystery for now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
@Ruprecht, good gravy, that's a brilliant rifle. Wow. The green paint, it may be my screen, but I can't make it out save for the stuff on the magazine. Is it the period theater paint, or a stateside job? I can't see it well enough to determine...it may be that the rifle itself has temporarily blinded me. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
It is an official Military authorised 'amendment', allowing the previously used Vaseline (petroleum jelly) to be used for other applications.
I have a Malby with the green paint, mostly intact still, but what I was asking was if Ruprecht's rifle has the theater paint you're talking about, or a paint applied much later. I don't see much green paint at all on his rifle, that's why I was asking. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I assume it was done in service, but who knows? As always, it does a good job and there's no corrosion at all under the barrel. My only other '41 is a Fazakerley. The only '41 BSA's I've seen for sale had too many replacement parts for the price and Long Branch's of that vintage are worth their weight in gold up here.

Ruprecht
I switched to my laptop. and sure enough, I can see those blotches of green paint now, all along the woodline and on the safety too. Now I see what you’re talking about, and certainly it was done in service like AdE mentioned. My one rifle that has that theater paint looks of the same color as yours.

Again, thanks for sharing those pics. Very sharp rifles. 👍🏻👍🏻
 
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