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Really a good thread here on a lot of information on bitzers, semi bitzers and variants. I'll take back my comment I cannot shoot my Lithgow w/o recoil pads and better state the condition as I choose not to shoot the rifle as the potential for degrading the draws is a risk and I'm okay wall hanging the rifle. I got other Lithgows to shoot . I have also two mint condition unfired since FTR British No1MkIII* post war refurbs so if I want to molest a virgin FTR, I have two on hand to do so. The bitzer JJCO rifle can stay unshot, not the end of the world . The new recoil pads w/screws Vulch sent me are in the butt trap. I'll stick a note in there and notify next owner he can do as he pleases .

Choice is a wonderful thing. Thanks Anthony for your patience
 

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This may be a dumb question, is it matching and marked FTR Doc?
Not a dumb question at all. It's marked FTR:
Wood Gas Household hardware Revolver Metal

Wood Gas Gun accessory Cylinder Metal


And it's ALMOST all matching:
  • the serial numbers match on the bolt, barrel (12/43) and nosecap
  • butt is stamped 1943
  • receiver is stamped FTR and AF (for air force)
  • the PAA numbers don't match
  • the forewood almost matches (E72963 on metalwork, E72398 on wood).

I'd always attributed this almost-matching wood to a bit of carelessness on the part of the armourer, who was refurbishing these near-obsolete rifles for the air force. On reflection, perhaps the forewood was replaced sometime after FTR? That would explain the lack of recoil plates.
 

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I have what will probably be considered a silly question. I hope that it will not be a cause of ridicule, I am just trying to learn something. In this thread, there seem to be many who feel that firing a Lithgow No1 Mk3* without the copper recoil plates is a bad idea. My 1942 Lithgow has them. My other No1 rifles made by other manufacturers such as BSA and Ishapore, do not have plates, and I have never seen or heard of any No1 rifles (or any Lee Enfields for that matter) other than Lithgows that do. Is this because Coachwood is a softer wood, and thus more compressible? If this is so, would the same be true of Queensland Maple furniture?
 

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Discussion Starter · #129 · (Edited)
So I started to take my Enfield apart because the rear sight guard is loose. I want to tighten that screw. I got all the screws removed to allow the forestock to come off but I think because it's all new condition and probably was never taken apart it does not seem to want to come out. I would just assume give up and not break anything but I noticed my gun is totally missing the forend rest and sping. Enfield #1 MK III Forend Rest and Spring Good

I will want to have that replaced but I will probably need the stock to come off for that anyway. Any advice on removing the forstock? Is there a place I shoudl tap with a mallet for example?
 

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Grab the forend at the mag well. Hold it upside down over a heavily padded surface
A hard gun case should do it.
lift the rifle off the padding just barely.
Give the underside of the butt socket a light, but sharp rap with a plastic or hard rubber mallet.
The entire rifle will fall into the padding.

Do not use any type of metal mallet or hammer etc. even a half pound brass might distort the screw boss.
If you like, you can put the screw into it should it make you feel better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #131 · (Edited)
Grab the forend at the mag well. Hold it upside down over a heavily padded surface
A hard gun case should do it.
lift the rifle off the padding just barely.
Give the underside of the butt socket a light, but sharp rap with a plastic or hard rubber mallet.
The entire rifle will fall into the padding.

Do not use any type of metal mallet or hammer etc. even a half pound brass might distort the screw boss.
If you like, you can put the screw into it should it make you feel better.
Thanks! That worked like a charm. The stock did not drop however I was able to gently pull it off. I can now order the needed part, I have tighented the sight guard screw up and here are some photos to see if I have what I think were called Drawls? If anyone notices any other parts missing let me know. Put some break free lube on that sticky trigger and it's no longer sticky.

When looking at the inside of the stock does anyone think I need to get a stock bolt plate?
Wood Wood stain Tints and shades Close-up Metal
Purple Grass Motor vehicle Bicycle Bicycle part
Automotive tire Grey Rim Bumper Automotive exterior

Wood Sleeve Glove Bicycle part Bumper

Automotive tire Black Tire Wheel Tread
 

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You mean recoil plates at the draws? ;)
Today, no. Just keep an eye on the compression marks though. Once those dark areas begin to compress then is the time to start thinking about it.
Meanwhile, when reassembling your rifle and installing the trigger guard, do it in proper order.
Start the screws but leave them loose until both are aligned.
Snug the small rear screw first. Then torque the King/Main screw “gorilla fkn tight”.
That loads tension on the small snugged screw and it ain’t goin’ nowhere. More small screw heads are buggered by trying to loosen them while the king screw is still tight. Don’t be that guy!

Also, when dropping the action into the wood, it goes directly down and squeezed into position. No tilting or wriggling. Let everything find its own way back home.

Also, if the time comes to install recoil pads there is no “All ya gotta do is….”.
It’s a very precise process of wood removal while maintaining proper angles. A lot of dry fitting to get equal bearing on both sides.
It’s a job not to be taken lightly.

Some of us have seen posts where the OP states “I put in recoil pads and the stock still fkn split wide open!! HELP ME??”
They missed something somewhere.
Again, don’t be that guy.

Linseed oil the wood before putting it all back together. Keep your King Screw tight. It’s fine for occasional shooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #133 ·
You mean recoil plates at the draws? ;)
Today, no. Just keep an eye on the compression marks though. Once those dark areas begin to compress then is the time to start thinking about it.
Meanwhile, when reassembling your rifle and installing the trigger guard, do it in proper order.
Start the screws but leave them loose until both are aligned.
Snug the small rear screw first. Then torque the King/Main screw “gorilla fkn tight”.
That loads tension on the small snugged screw and it ain’t goin’ nowhere. More small screw heads are buggered by trying to loosen them while the king screw is still tight. Don’t be that guy!

Also, when dropping the action into the wood, it goes directly down and squeezed into position. No tilting or wriggling. Let everything find its own way back home.

Also, if the time comes to install recoil pads there is no “All ya gotta do is….”.
It’s a very precise process of wood removal while maintaining proper angles. A lot of dry fitting to get equal bearing on both sides.
It’s a job not to be taken lightly.

Some of us have seen posts where the OP states “I put in recoil pads and the stock still fkn split wide open!! HELP ME??”
They missed something somewhere.
Again, don’t be that guy.

Linseed oil the wood before putting it all back together. Keep your King Screw tight. It’s fine for occasional shooting.
I put it back together already but I did not tighten anytigng down too much as I will be getting that rest and spring to put in next week. But as to the Linseed oil, it looks like no one's applied any since it's initial oiling of the wood before the stock was sent to the warehouse stock. Should I oil it now? Just not sure.
 

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I put it back together already but I did not tighten anytigng down too much as I will be getting that rest and spring to put in next week. But as to the Linseed oil, it looks like no one's applied any since it's initial oiling of the wood before the stock was sent to the warehouse stock. Should I oil it now? Just not sure.
There’s no better time than now. Inside and out, raw linseed, soft cloth. Rub on, allow to soak, rub off. Never let it congeal or go hard on the surface. Don’t rub corners to hard, you’ll round them off and lose definition of the lines.
 

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^^^^What he said. Now is the best time so you’re done or almost done when your parts arrive

If you don’t happen to have raw linseed oil, boiled works fine when diluted 50/50 with pure turpentine. You just have to do it a few extra times.

NO box store synthetic crap. Anything that says xxxx oil FINISH is crap for rifles. Pure gum turpentine and not Turps or mineral spirits.
We’re working with rifles. Not chairs and tables etc.
The box store products can produce a good finish, but it’s the effect we’re after.
Penetration with the oil in the wood, not on it.
 

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Yes.
there's a piece of the stock missing, between the main bolt & the magazine well cutout (see red >> <<)
View attachment 3978520

View attachment 3978521
C’mon now Plonker…how many times has that senseless bit of wood been discussed? It doesn’t matter!
Replacement stocks came with that section cut away so that meaningless chip of wood doesn’t hang out loose inside the rifle.
It doesn’t matter. No need for making a repair. The bushing is trapped in place. It cannot move unless the screw is loose. In which case that piece of wood gives way on the first firing anyway.
Tight screw = no problem
 

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Whatever, he asked I replied.
You can actually see where it split away, but WTF do I know.
Dear O.P.
Go ahead fire it.
Just ignore all the evidence & have at it.
Do NOT blame me later though.
 

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