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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
fellas,
I have a choice of picking a rifle from the years 1939-44. All are same condition, is theer ant better years?
cheers
NED
 

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Around 1944, and perhaps even a little before, the arsenal began the change from walnut to beech stocks. However, there does not seem to be any obvious variation in the quality of the rest of the guns that I have noted over the last three decades of hanging around Swiss stuff.

A bit like their watches - my dad's 1952 Breitling Navitimer 806 seems to be just as accurate as any of my newer Breitlings, Rolex or IWC watches. The jury is still out on my latest Rolex - I'll let you know in twenty years or so.

tac
Supporter of the Cape Meares Lighthouse Restoration Fund
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thedilemma I have is that there is another shipment coming in about 2 months and they are mid late fifties manufacture.
Which would be more desireable?
Ah the frustration!!! Might have to sell one of kids and but one of each!!
thanks fellas
cheers
NED
 

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Well, the 50,s carbines were shot alittle less than the early Walnuts (33-44). But the difference is probably not that noticeable for the average shooter. As far as quality goes, there all good.
 

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Round count can be a big factor in accuracy, newer rifles, less rounds, normally. You can always measure the bore. Per specification a new muzzle would measure 7.51mm and shot out at 7.64mm. I have a 34, 41 and 44 and they are in the 7.54+ range.
 

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Round Count?

So I wonder how often the average 'reservist' Swiss rifle shooter would log range time, and how many rounds per each range session? What was the minimum to maintain proficiency, and would he be encouraged to exceed that? If anyone has been fortunate to establish communication with their rifle's previous Swiss owner, that would be some interesting, maybe even useful, bit of trivia, for some of us?
 

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So I wonder how often the average 'reservist' Swiss rifle shooter would log range time, and how many rounds per each range session? What was the minimum to maintain proficiency, and would he be encouraged to exceed that? If anyone has been fortunate to establish communication with their rifle's previous Swiss owner, that would be some interesting, maybe even useful, bit of trivia, for some of us?
I asked this same question last year when I got my first K31.

Since you have established contact with a Swiss official (per your other post on this forum) I'd suggest asking him about the annual training ammunition allocation.

As the training officer in a US army artillery battalion in Germany in the 70's I prepared the annual training ammunition forecast, based on the TDA (Table of Distribution and Allowances) that specified how many rounds per assigned weapon were authorized for annual weapons qualification and familiarization firing. I would suspect the Swiss army has something similar. Training ammunition is usually drawn from the oldest stocks in the ASP (ammunition supply point) to make room for fresh stock, or when specific lots in the unit's basic load are downgraded from war reserve.
 
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